DSL internet speeds - wh is the limiter?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Crash, May 16, 2006.

  1. Crash

    Crash Guest

    In another thread I posted this:

    So in summary the following applies in respect of download/upload speeds:

    - They will never exceed the connection speed reported by your router.
    - They should never exceed the speed of your plan.
    - Actual speed at any time is dependent on conditions.

    I am now wondering who has what influence on each of these limits - Telecom (as
    the line company) or your ISP.

    Logically the connection speed achieved by the router will probably be limited
    by Telecom - with line quality and distance from the DSLAM being the major
    factors. The router's capabilities might also be a factor but this seems
    unlikely in current circumstances. However if the DSLAM belongs to your ISP
    then could its hardware capabilities also be a factor?

    The speed of your plan is clearly an ISP-imposed limit is it not?

    The conditions that govern actual speed would be entirely within your ISPs
    control would it not? Unless the DSLAM is owned by Telecom and its throughput
    capabilities can be overloaded?

    I suspect I am revealing my relative ignorance here - so I would appreciate
    clarification.

    Thanks in anticipation,
    Crash.
    Crash, May 16, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Crash

    Dogboy Guest

    Crash wrote:
    > In another thread I posted this:
    >
    > So in summary the following applies in respect of download/upload speeds:
    >
    > - They will never exceed the connection speed reported by your router.
    > - They should never exceed the speed of your plan.
    > - Actual speed at any time is dependent on conditions.
    >
    > I am now wondering who has what influence on each of these limits -
    > Telecom (as the line company) or your ISP.


    That summary is essentially correct. In my experience your connection
    speed is limited by both Telecom and your ISP.

    Firstly Telecom owns or has control of (almost?) every DSLAM in New
    Zealand. They have direct control of the connection between your ADSL
    Modem and the DSLAM. Unbundling will give competitors the ability to put
    their own equipment in but we dont have that at the moment.

    Telecom can and have gotten this connection speed wrong, I know people
    who are supposed to be on 2mbps plans but because Telecom has connected
    them to the DSLAM at the wrong speed they are stuck at 256kbps. Getting
    these type of problems fixed can take a while as Telecom can dick around
    when it comes to sorting out that connection.

    Secondly your ISP limits your connection speed further upstream. When my
    broadband plan was upgraded to 2mbps from 256kbps my connection to the
    exchange was upgraded to 2mbps before my ISP has stopped limiting me at
    256kbps. So while I was connected to the exchange at 2mbps all
    speedtests I did were limited to 256kbps.

    Then there is the connection speed limited by the physical conditions.
    Your actually connection speed will be the lowest of those 3 factors.

    Physical connection speed is usually out of peoples (willing) control,
    your connection to the exchange is limited by telecom and further
    upstream your connection is limited by your ISP.

    I think that covers it.

    --
    Dogboy
    Dogboy, May 17, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Crash

    Crash Guest

    Dogboy wrote:
    > Crash wrote:
    >> In another thread I posted this:
    >>
    >> So in summary the following applies in respect of download/upload speeds:
    >>
    >> - They will never exceed the connection speed reported by your router.
    >> - They should never exceed the speed of your plan.
    >> - Actual speed at any time is dependent on conditions.
    >>
    >> I am now wondering who has what influence on each of these limits -
    >> Telecom (as the line company) or your ISP.

    >
    > That summary is essentially correct. In my experience your connection
    > speed is limited by both Telecom and your ISP.
    >
    > Firstly Telecom owns or has control of (almost?) every DSLAM in New
    > Zealand. They have direct control of the connection between your ADSL
    > Modem and the DSLAM. Unbundling will give competitors the ability to put
    > their own equipment in but we dont have that at the moment.

    [snip]

    Many thanks. I was unsure who owned the DSLAM and what the effect of unbundling
    would have. That clears it up nicely.

    Crash.
    Crash, May 17, 2006
    #3
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Xeno Chauvin

    Core speeds and memory speeds???

    Xeno Chauvin, Oct 3, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    488
    ┬░Mike┬░
    Oct 3, 2003
  2. Old Gringo

    Bad DSL Speeds

    Old Gringo, Apr 16, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    1,014
    Evan Platt
    Apr 17, 2005
  3. peterboyd124

    DSL speeds?

    peterboyd124, Oct 20, 2003, in forum: Computer Information
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    892
    peterboyd124
    Oct 20, 2003
  4. =?Utf-8?B?TkpU?=

    Internet Sharing: Equal upload speeds but un-equal download speeds

    =?Utf-8?B?TkpU?=, Sep 14, 2007, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    993
    =?Utf-8?B?TkpU?=
    Sep 15, 2007
  5. Nancy
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    716
    kaiqiang
    Jun 26, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page