DSC-V1 Screen cracked - Sony are a ripoff . . ?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Sky High, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. Sky High

    Sky High Guest

    Hi,
    I've got a DSC-V1 Sony digital camera and I accidentally cracked the LCD
    screen on it.
    The camera still works fine, and I rang Sony for a rough idea on repairing
    it.

    I discovered from a parts seller that the LCD screen costs £69.

    When I rang Sony last week, they said they do a "fixed price repair" for
    £114.
    This week when I rang to book the camera in, they said "They'll do a fixed
    price repair if they can, otherwise it will cost more" ?

    In that case, it isn't a fixed price repair, and she admitted it normally
    costs a lot more!
    A new DSC-V1 camera costs roughly £270.

    What sort of Customer Service does the faceless Sony offer if they rip
    people off for repair costs ?
    Sure, perhaps I should have got accidental damage cover. Perhaps I should
    have also bought another Fujifilm camera with the good customer service that
    goes with it.

    It's a long shot, but does anyone know how difficult is it to change the
    screen on a DSC-V1 ?

    What are your experiences \ what would you do ?

    Many thanks,
    Paul
     
    Sky High, Nov 4, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "Sky High" <> wrote in message
    news:4189fb4d$0$29190$...
    > Hi,
    > I've got a DSC-V1 Sony digital camera and I accidentally cracked the LCD
    > screen on it.
    > The camera still works fine, and I rang Sony for a rough idea on repairing
    > it.
    >
    > I discovered from a parts seller that the LCD screen costs £69.
    >
    > When I rang Sony last week, they said they do a "fixed price repair" for
    > £114.
    > This week when I rang to book the camera in, they said "They'll do a fixed
    > price repair if they can, otherwise it will cost more" ?
    >
    > In that case, it isn't a fixed price repair, and she admitted it normally
    > costs a lot more!
    > A new DSC-V1 camera costs roughly £270.
    >
    > What sort of Customer Service does the faceless Sony offer if they rip
    > people off for repair costs ?
    > Sure, perhaps I should have got accidental damage cover. Perhaps I should
    > have also bought another Fujifilm camera with the good customer service

    that
    > goes with it.
    >
    > It's a long shot, but does anyone know how difficult is it to change the
    > screen on a DSC-V1 ?
    >
    > What are your experiences \ what would you do ?
    >
    > Many thanks,
    > Paul
    >

    I would be more careful...
     
    Not in my trousers, Nov 4, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Let understand this. You broke the screen. The Repair shop wants £45 labour
    and £69 in parts? Sounds resonable to me. Or is their a law in England that
    says you can't charge for your time, So buy the part and fix the bloddy
    thing your self, then expect to pay even more for a shop to undo your fix...



    "Sky High" <> wrote in message
    news:4189fb4d$0$29190$...
    > Hi,
    > I've got a DSC-V1 Sony digital camera and I accidentally cracked the LCD
    > screen on it.
    > The camera still works fine, and I rang Sony for a rough idea on repairing
    > it.
    >
    > I discovered from a parts seller that the LCD screen costs £69.
    >
    > When I rang Sony last week, they said they do a "fixed price repair" for
    > £114.
    > This week when I rang to book the camera in, they said "They'll do a fixed
    > price repair if they can, otherwise it will cost more" ?
    >
    > In that case, it isn't a fixed price repair, and she admitted it normally
    > costs a lot more!
    > A new DSC-V1 camera costs roughly £270.
    >
    > What sort of Customer Service does the faceless Sony offer if they rip
    > people off for repair costs ?
    > Sure, perhaps I should have got accidental damage cover. Perhaps I should
    > have also bought another Fujifilm camera with the good customer service

    that
    > goes with it.
    >
    > It's a long shot, but does anyone know how difficult is it to change the
    > screen on a DSC-V1 ?
    >
    > What are your experiences \ what would you do ?
    >
    > Many thanks,
    > Paul
    >
    >



    ---

    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.788 / Virus Database: 533 - Release Date: 11/1/2004
     
    Darrell Larose, Nov 4, 2004
    #3
  4. Sky High

    kate Guest

    > > Hi,
    > > I've got a DSC-V1 Sony digital camera and I accidentally cracked the LCD
    > > screen on it.
    > > The camera still works fine, and I rang Sony for a rough idea on

    repairing
    > > it.
    > >
    > > I discovered from a parts seller that the LCD screen costs £69.
    > >
    > > When I rang Sony last week, they said they do a "fixed price repair" for
    > > £114.
    > > This week when I rang to book the camera in, they said "They'll do a

    fixed
    > > price repair if they can, otherwise it will cost more" ?
    > >
    > > In that case, it isn't a fixed price repair, and she admitted it

    normally
    > > costs a lot more!
    > > A new DSC-V1 camera costs roughly £270.
    > >
    > > What sort of Customer Service does the faceless Sony offer if they rip
    > > people off for repair costs ?
    > > Sure, perhaps I should have got accidental damage cover. Perhaps I

    should
    > > have also bought another Fujifilm camera with the good customer service

    > that
    > > goes with it.
    > >
    > > It's a long shot, but does anyone know how difficult is it to change the
    > > screen on a DSC-V1 ?
    > >
    > > What are your experiences \ what would you do ?
    > >
    > > Many thanks,
    > > Paul


    If the repair is about ( or over ) half the prize of a new one, I would go
    without the LCD screen.. ( or sell this one and buy a new Fuji one.. )
    It's not under warranty anymore ?
    Also, keep in mind you have to pay for shipping both ways..
    I once send a F7 something ( 1 MP, ancient ;)) to sony for repair, repair
    was almost twice the price of a new one, and oh, we forgot to mention that
    if you want it back you have to pay $25 for the shipping ( about double the
    real costs back then.. ).
    Wish I had taken out the battery before shipping the thing off..
     
    kate, Nov 4, 2004
    #4
  5. Sky High

    Sky High Guest

    "kate" <> wrote in message
    news:418a2ef3$0$36861$4all.nl...
    > If the repair is about ( or over ) half the prize of a new one, I would go
    > without the LCD screen.. ( or sell this one and buy a new Fuji one.. )
    > It's not under warranty anymore ?
    > Also, keep in mind you have to pay for shipping both ways..
    > I once send a F7 something ( 1 MP, ancient ;)) to sony for repair, repair
    > was almost twice the price of a new one, and oh, we forgot to mention that
    > if you want it back you have to pay $25 for the shipping ( about double
    > the
    > real costs back then.. ).
    > Wish I had taken out the battery before shipping the thing off..


    Hi Kate,
    I guess you're right Kate. It's a hard one to swallow, but it's the
    open-ended pricing that a have a problem with.

    I mean, I explained on the phone the model and the part it needed, and they
    just say "aww - well it could be other things too and we can't price without
    seeing it", even when I explained it works no problem!

    Darrell posted above in the thread suggesting I should get the part myself
    because I'm too tight to pay for the repair and then the subsequent
    'unrepair'. I didn't mean that Darrell, and I don't mind paying, it's just
    their customer service approach of the open-ended pricing that it very poor.

    I mean, would you like to send a camera off, for them to then tell you it
    will cost £160 to repair, but if you don't want to go ahead then they'll
    charge you £60 to return it to you anyway ? That's crap service.

    Paul
     
    Sky High, Nov 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Sky High

    Mark M Guest

    "Sky High" <> wrote in message
    news:418a4874$0$10510$...
    > "kate" <> wrote in message
    > news:418a2ef3$0$36861$4all.nl...
    > > If the repair is about ( or over ) half the prize of a new one, I would

    go
    > > without the LCD screen.. ( or sell this one and buy a new Fuji one.. )
    > > It's not under warranty anymore ?
    > > Also, keep in mind you have to pay for shipping both ways..
    > > I once send a F7 something ( 1 MP, ancient ;)) to sony for repair,

    repair
    > > was almost twice the price of a new one, and oh, we forgot to mention

    that
    > > if you want it back you have to pay $25 for the shipping ( about double
    > > the
    > > real costs back then.. ).
    > > Wish I had taken out the battery before shipping the thing off..

    >
    > Hi Kate,
    > I guess you're right Kate. It's a hard one to swallow, but it's the
    > open-ended pricing that a have a problem with.
    >
    > I mean, I explained on the phone the model and the part it needed, and

    they
    > just say "aww - well it could be other things too and we can't price

    without
    > seeing it", even when I explained it works no problem!
    >
    > Darrell posted above in the thread suggesting I should get the part myself
    > because I'm too tight to pay for the repair and then the subsequent
    > 'unrepair'. I didn't mean that Darrell, and I don't mind paying, it's just
    > their customer service approach of the open-ended pricing that it very

    poor.
    >
    > I mean, would you like to send a camera off, for them to then tell you it
    > will cost £160 to repair, but if you don't want to go ahead then they'll
    > charge you £60 to return it to you anyway ? That's crap service.


    Surely you must understand that it would be foolish for any repair service
    to give you a quote before they have examined the device...
    -Fact is, there very well could be other damage internally related to
    playback (in addition to obvious external damage) which is not evident to
    you. While this may not be likely, it is certainly possible--which means it
    is reasonable for them to wait.

    Repairs are expensive for companies because rather than just running down an
    assembly line (like when building the device when new), the device requires
    time, thought, and specific (non-assembly-line-type) work. They would
    likely actually save themselves time and money by simply giving you a new
    one, but they can't for obvious reasons. This is why it is often better for
    consumers to simply replace the thing. Frustrating, but it's just reality.
    If you ever go into manufacturing, you'll understand that you can't play
    Santa Claus every time someone breaks your product.
     
    Mark M, Nov 4, 2004
    #6
  7. Sky High

    Larry Guest

    In article <ELuid.208823$a85.113455@fed1read04>, mjmorgan2
    @goaway.cox.unless.no.crap.net says...
    > Surely you must understand that it would be foolish for any repair service
    > to give you a quote before they have examined the device...
    > -Fact is, there very well could be other damage internally related to
    > playback (in addition to obvious external damage) which is not evident to
    > you. While this may not be likely, it is certainly possible--which means it
    > is reasonable for them to wait.
    >
    > Repairs are expensive for companies because rather than just running down an
    > assembly line (like when building the device when new), the device requires
    > time, thought, and specific (non-assembly-line-type) work. They would
    > likely actually save themselves time and money by simply giving you a new
    > one, but they can't for obvious reasons. This is why it is often better for
    > consumers to simply replace the thing. Frustrating, but it's just reality.
    > If you ever go into manufacturing, you'll understand that you can't play
    > Santa Claus every time someone breaks your product.
    >


    Digital camera repair is similar to TV repair on consumer
    grade non home theater TVs.. By the time you pay for the
    part and the labor, you could have bought a newer better
    one.

    Its been that way for a long time in the colonies.


    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry, Nov 4, 2004
    #7
  8. Sky High

    Alan Meyer Guest

    "Mark M" <> wrote in message
    news:ELuid.208823$a85.113455@fed1read04...
    > ...
    > Surely you must understand that it would be foolish for any repair service
    > to give you a quote before they have examined the device...
    > -Fact is, there very well could be other damage internally related to
    > playback (in addition to obvious external damage) which is not evident to
    > you. While this may not be likely, it is certainly possible--which means

    it
    > is reasonable for them to wait.
    >
    > Repairs are expensive for companies because rather than just running down

    an
    > assembly line (like when building the device when new), the device

    requires
    > time, thought, and specific (non-assembly-line-type) work. They would
    > likely actually save themselves time and money by simply giving you a new
    > one, but they can't for obvious reasons. This is why it is often better

    for
    > consumers to simply replace the thing. Frustrating, but it's just

    reality.
    > If you ever go into manufacturing, you'll understand that you can't play
    > Santa Claus every time someone breaks your product.


    Your points are well taken, and can't disagree with them.
    I understand that if repairing cameras is your main business and you
    need to make a profit from it, it is hard to offer fixed price repairs,
    although I have seen it done, for example, with computer monitors.

    However if I were a camera manufacturer I would seriously consider
    offering fixed price repairs as a customer service. Sony is in a
    special position for a lot of reasons.

    First, they get the parts much, much cheaper than any repair shop can.
    Ditto for service manuals, special tools, and factory training.

    Second, they only repair Sony cameras, they don't need parts,
    manuals, training, or expertise on any other brands.

    Third, they can profit from repeat sales and new sales to
    customers who like the idea that they can get fixed price
    repairs. The increased good will and sales it engenders
    might very well more than cover any losses.

    Fourth, they don't need a single fixed price. It would
    not be unreasonable, for example, to offer a fixed price
    for electronics repairs and another fixed price for optics
    repairs. A customer could probably tell the difference
    95% of the time.

    Finally, in impossible cases (customer sends in a camera
    that has been run over and mashed by a truck), they could
    return the junk to the customer and charge nothing.

    But then I don't own a camera company and never will
    (sigh). I'll never be president of a multinational corporation
    (again, sigh). So my business advice may be suspect.

    Alan
     
    Alan Meyer, Nov 5, 2004
    #8
  9. Sky High

    Cynthia P Guest

    On Thu, 4 Nov 2004 10:43:49 -0800, "Mark M"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Sky High" <> wrote in message
    >news:418a4874$0$10510$...
    >> "kate" <> wrote in message
    >> news:418a2ef3$0$36861$4all.nl...
    >> > If the repair is about ( or over ) half the prize of a new one, I would

    >go
    >> > without the LCD screen.. ( or sell this one and buy a new Fuji one.. )
    >> > It's not under warranty anymore ?
    >> > Also, keep in mind you have to pay for shipping both ways..
    >> > I once send a F7 something ( 1 MP, ancient ;)) to sony for repair,

    >repair
    >> > was almost twice the price of a new one, and oh, we forgot to mention

    >that
    >> > if you want it back you have to pay $25 for the shipping ( about double
    >> > the
    >> > real costs back then.. ).
    >> > Wish I had taken out the battery before shipping the thing off..

    >>
    >> Hi Kate,
    >> I guess you're right Kate. It's a hard one to swallow, but it's the
    >> open-ended pricing that a have a problem with.
    >>
    >> I mean, I explained on the phone the model and the part it needed, and

    >they
    >> just say "aww - well it could be other things too and we can't price

    >without
    >> seeing it", even when I explained it works no problem!
    >>
    >> Darrell posted above in the thread suggesting I should get the part myself
    >> because I'm too tight to pay for the repair and then the subsequent
    >> 'unrepair'. I didn't mean that Darrell, and I don't mind paying, it's just
    >> their customer service approach of the open-ended pricing that it very

    >poor.
    >>
    >> I mean, would you like to send a camera off, for them to then tell you it
    >> will cost £160 to repair, but if you don't want to go ahead then they'll
    >> charge you £60 to return it to you anyway ? That's crap service.

    >
    >Surely you must understand that it would be foolish for any repair service
    >to give you a quote before they have examined the device...
    >-Fact is, there very well could be other damage internally related to
    >playback (in addition to obvious external damage) which is not evident to
    >you. While this may not be likely, it is certainly possible--which means it
    >is reasonable for them to wait.
    >
    >Repairs are expensive for companies because rather than just running down an
    >assembly line (like when building the device when new), the device requires
    >time, thought, and specific (non-assembly-line-type) work. They would
    >likely actually save themselves time and money by simply giving you a new
    >one, but they can't for obvious reasons. This is why it is often better for
    >consumers to simply replace the thing. Frustrating, but it's just reality.
    >If you ever go into manufacturing, you'll understand that you can't play
    >Santa Claus every time someone breaks your product.
    >
    >



    I used to do a lot of repair on high end preamplifiers. Now, my boss
    did the diagnostics... but I did the de-soldering, cleanup and
    replacement of parts. I can absolutely say that what my boss charged
    for repairs was more than reasonable... the time it took was usually
    more than what customers were charged for.

    I always thought he should charge twice what he did. Even though our
    products were built to be relatively easy to repair.

    And we got everything from pre-amps that had been submerged in water
    to ones that cats had peed in to ones that mice had died in. Not to
    mention lightning-fried and just old age.

    Cynthia
     
    Cynthia P, Nov 5, 2004
    #9
  10. Sky High

    Paul J Gans Guest

    Larry <> wrote:
    >In article <ELuid.208823$a85.113455@fed1read04>, mjmorgan2
    >@goaway.cox.unless.no.crap.net says...
    >> Surely you must understand that it would be foolish for any repair service
    >> to give you a quote before they have examined the device...
    >> -Fact is, there very well could be other damage internally related to
    >> playback (in addition to obvious external damage) which is not evident to
    >> you. While this may not be likely, it is certainly possible--which means it
    >> is reasonable for them to wait.
    >>
    >> Repairs are expensive for companies because rather than just running down an
    >> assembly line (like when building the device when new), the device requires
    >> time, thought, and specific (non-assembly-line-type) work. They would
    >> likely actually save themselves time and money by simply giving you a new
    >> one, but they can't for obvious reasons. This is why it is often better for
    >> consumers to simply replace the thing. Frustrating, but it's just reality.
    >> If you ever go into manufacturing, you'll understand that you can't play
    >> Santa Claus every time someone breaks your product.
    >>


    >Digital camera repair is similar to TV repair on consumer
    >grade non home theater TVs.. By the time you pay for the
    >part and the labor, you could have bought a newer better
    >one.


    >Its been that way for a long time in the colonies.


    Nah. It really is that way. Individual unscripted labor
    is *very* expensive. Scripted labor (aka the production line)
    is relatively cheap as the product arrives at the worker's
    station all set for his part to be added. Not so with a
    repair.

    This is sad but true. But it also has meant that we get
    ridiculously cheap products. Anyone want to guess what
    my desktop machine would have cost in 1970? Or how much
    it would have weighed?

    ---- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Nov 8, 2004
    #10
  11. Sky High

    ArtKramr Guest

    >Subject: Re: DSC-V1 Screen cracked - Sony are a ripoff . . ?
    >From: Paul J Gans
    >Date: 11/8/2004 10:01 AM Pacific Standard Time
    >Message-id: <cmoc91$riq$>
    >
    >Larry <> wrote:
    >>In article <ELuid.208823$a85.113455@fed1read04>, mjmorgan2
    >>@goaway.cox.unless.no.crap.net says...
    >>> Surely you must understand that it would be foolish for any repair service
    >>> to give you a quote before they have examined the device...
    >>> -Fact is, there very well could be other damage internally related to
    >>> playback (in addition to obvious external damage) which is not evident to
    >>> you. While this may not be likely, it is certainly possible--which means

    >it
    >>> is reasonable for them to wait.
    >>>
    >>> Repairs are expensive for companies because rather than just running down

    >an
    >>> assembly line (like when building the device when new), the device

    >requires
    >>> time, thought, and specific (non-assembly-line-type) work. They would
    >>> likely actually save themselves time and money by simply giving you a new
    >>> one, but they can't for obvious reasons. This is why it is often better

    >for
    >>> consumers to simply replace the thing. Frustrating, but it's just

    >reality.
    >>> If you ever go into manufacturing, you'll understand that you can't play
    >>> Santa Claus every time someone breaks your product.
    >>>

    >
    >>Digital camera repair is similar to TV repair on consumer
    >>grade non home theater TVs.. By the time you pay for the
    >>part and the labor, you could have bought a newer better
    >>one.

    >
    >>Its been that way for a long time in the colonies.

    >
    >Nah. It really is that way. Individual unscripted labor
    >is *very* expensive. Scripted labor (aka the production line)
    >is relatively cheap as the product arrives at the worker's
    >station all set for his part to be added. Not so with a
    >repair.
    >
    >This is sad but true. But it also has meant that we get
    >ridiculously cheap products. Anyone want to guess what
    >my desktop machine would have cost in 1970? Or how much
    >it would have weighed?
    >
    > ---- Paul J. Gans
    >


    Sony? Aren't those the guys who brought us Pearl Harbor?


    Arthur Kramer
    344th BG 494th BS
    England, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany
    Visit my WW II B-26 website at:
    http://www.coastcomp.com/artkramer
     
    ArtKramr, Nov 8, 2004
    #11
  12. Sky High

    Larry Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > Sony? Aren't those the guys who brought us Pearl Harbor?
    >
    >
    > Arthur Kramer
    > 344th BG 494th BS
    > England, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany




    No, Im pretty sure that was Hirohito, and Yamamoto.

    Painting all of Japan, and its products with a Pearl Harbor
    paintbrush is similar to saying all Americans are like
    Hanoi Jane.




    >


    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry, Nov 8, 2004
    #12
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. digcam

    Sony DSC-V1 vs Sony DSC-F717

    digcam, Oct 30, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    624
    Unclaimed Mysteries
    Oct 31, 2003
  2. luke

    Sony DSC P10 (or the DSC P5, DSC P9 or DSC P12)

    luke, Dec 24, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    654
  3. Scott

    cracked screen HP M407, repairable in the UK

    Scott, Jun 14, 2005, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    359
    Scott
    Jun 14, 2005
  4. Replies:
    1
    Views:
    350
    tomcas
    Nov 14, 2005
  5. Cracked LCD screen ... what now?

    , Sep 9, 2006, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    1,565
    bugbear
    Sep 15, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page