DRM - Digital Restrictions Management

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Peter, Oct 7, 2003.

  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/165

    "... Microsoft's DRM: it has great potential for unintended consequences. It
    can become a tool for the bad guys while also stopping the good guys - like
    whistleblowers. Daniel Ellsberg photocopied the famous Pentagon Papers
    detailing the true extent of America's involvement in Vietnam and sent them
    to The New York Times, where they were published. Cynthia Cooper, Vice
    President of Internal Audit at WorldCom, didn't believe Arthur Andersen was
    performing its job in an ethical manner, so she and her team performed a
    secret re-audit. Time Magazine reports that "one of Cooper's employees
    bought a CD burner and started copying data, concerned that the information
    might be destroyed before they could finish". Thanks to Cooper and her
    team, the world found out about the WorldCom's illegalities.

    Microsoft's DRM would have made those heroic actions impossible ..."

    Given Microsoft's unlawful track record to date, there are some real dangers
    if they get away with this one.


    Peter
     
    Peter, Oct 7, 2003
    #1
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  2. "Peter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/165
    >
    > "... Microsoft's DRM: it has great potential for unintended consequences.

    It
    > can become a tool for the bad guys while also stopping the good guys -

    like
    > whistleblowers. Daniel Ellsberg photocopied the famous Pentagon Papers
    > detailing the true extent of America's involvement in Vietnam and sent

    them
    > to The New York Times, where they were published. Cynthia Cooper, Vice
    > President of Internal Audit at WorldCom, didn't believe Arthur Andersen

    was
    > performing its job in an ethical manner, so she and her team performed a
    > secret re-audit. Time Magazine reports that "one of Cooper's employees
    > bought a CD burner and started copying data, concerned that the

    information
    > might be destroyed before they could finish". Thanks to Cooper and her
    > team, the world found out about the WorldCom's illegalities.
    >
    > Microsoft's DRM would have made those heroic actions impossible ..."


    Really. Maybe you have never heard of workaround using analog then? How
    about taking a photo of the content, maybe writing it down on a piece of
    paper, telling someone the info over the telephone? DRMs going to stop all
    those?

    There are 2 sides to all technology of course. DRM has many useful things
    to offer businesses who today have no control over information in email that
    the CEO sends out to the whole company, no control over documents sitting on
    a fileshare somewhere (ACLs don't cut the mustard as once someone as access
    to content they can do whatever they like) Many many businesses want this
    technology, and are willing to pay for it to be implemented.

    Who are you to say what businesses should do with their intellectual
    property.

    > Given Microsoft's unlawful track record to date, there are some real

    dangers
    > if they get away with this one.


    Freak. Just because Linux doesn't have this feature to offer customers that
    want it
    http://microsoft.com/rms
     
    Nathan Mercer, Oct 7, 2003
    #2
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  3. Peter

    Peter Guest

    this quote is from Nathan Mercer of Tue, 07 Oct 2003 19:26 :
    >
    > Really. Maybe you have never heard of workaround using analog then? How
    > about taking a photo of the content, maybe writing it down on a piece of
    > paper, telling someone the info over the telephone? DRMs going to stop
    > all those?


    If, as you say, DRM does not prevent unauthorised access, what is the
    purpose? Is it really just to lock in customers, as the article suggests?
    (It is possible that DRM will not prevent access, just as the "copy
    protected" audio CDs don't stop copying, they just inhibit honest users
    from enjoying what they paid for.)

    > There are 2 sides to all technology of course. DRM has many useful things
    > to offer businesses who today have no control over information in email
    > that the CEO sends out to the whole company, no control over documents
    > sitting on a fileshare somewhere (ACLs don't cut the mustard as once
    > someone as access
    > to content they can do whatever they like) Many many businesses want this
    > technology, and are willing to pay for it to be implemented.


    Of course, businesses should exercise the same control over digital
    information as over other media, such as paper copies. Software systems
    are no substitute for proper (human) management controls and policies.
    Providing software locks on data offers some real benefits, but having
    Microsoft as the guardian of the keys exposes enormous risks, as explained
    in the article.

    > Freak. Just because Linux doesn't have this feature to offer customers
    > that want it


    I'm sorry, abuse does nothing to strengthen your argument, quite the
    contrary.

    Anyway, the open source community has a strong trend of providing the
    features that the users / customers want.


    Peter
     
    Peter, Oct 7, 2003
    #3
  4. Peter

    The Flash Guest

    This is the usual ms bashing as always, Its just a locks on doors issue,
    does the lock keep people out or keep people in?

    Sure its hard to leak / steal something if it locked up well (DRM) thats the
    point of it!

    To claim that worldcom ceo Bernard J. Ebbers exploits would have continued
    indefinatly had DRM been inplace is wrong. All the conspititorys would be
    held accountable eventually no matter what methods were used to protect the
    data, when the moneys gone and the shareholds start screaming DRM is not
    going to save your criminal arse.

    Stop using FUD over a good idea, security is important and as all modern OS
    seem to have the ability to retain private data that a sieve has to holding
    water we need every help we can.

    > Anyway, the open source community has a strong trend of providing the
    > features that the users / customers want.


    On a reactive basis, I have yet to see any really proactive open source
    features that are so compelling people start throwing there ms box's out the
    window and deploying an open source alternative.

    > Peter
    >
     
    The Flash, Oct 7, 2003
    #4
  5. Peter

    Peter Guest

    this quote is from The Flash of Tue, 07 Oct 2003 23:45 :
    > This is the usual ms bashing as always, Its just a locks on doors issue,
    > does the lock keep people out or keep people in?


    You seem to be suggesting that we all must blindly obey and unquestioningly
    accept all that Microsoft dictates to us.
    One of the concerning points is that Microsoft has been found guilty several
    times, but has not shown any admission of wrong doing, nor any indication
    that it'll mend it's ways. This gives the impression that Microsoft fully
    intends to continue levering off its monopoly to stream roller over
    competitors and customers.

    Providing software locks on data offers potential for real benefits in
    certain cases, but having Microsoft as the guardian of the keys exposes
    enormous risks, as explained in the cited article.

    > On a reactive basis, I have yet to see any really proactive open source
    > features that are so compelling people start throwing there ms box's out
    > the window and deploying an open source alternative.


    Well, people say the same thing about Microsoft, ie that it has produced no
    innovation itself (unless you count that sodding paper clip).
    http://www.vcnet.com/bms/departments/innovation.shtml


    Peter
     
    Peter, Oct 7, 2003
    #5
  6. techie wrote:
    > If MS succeeds here then we'll be forced either to go
    > along or to forego new music, videos, ebooks, and perhaps even web
    > pages.


    Ah, for eBooks, you can de-.lit them with a tool called "clit". It gives you
    the original HTML that you are free to convert to any other format.

    Cheers,
    Nicholas Sherlock
     
    Nicholas Sherlock, Oct 7, 2003
    #6
  7. Peter

    techie Guest

    On Tue, 07 Oct 2003 03:45:05 -0700, The Flash wrote:


    > This is the usual ms bashing as always, Its just a locks on doors issue,
    > does the lock keep people out or keep people in?


    The issue here is who holds the keys to your home - you or a big greedy
    monopoly with a sordid past?

    I think DRM's a great idea so long as I hold all the keys. The problem
    is keeping that from evolving into a system where applications
    developers and the media industry hold the keys and use them to deprive
    users of fair use of the IP they've paid for. Stopping that evolution is
    a completely hopeless task on closed-source Windows, where MS holds
    total control over the code. In fact, MS has already made it quite
    clear that that's their ultimate goal.

    The forces at work here are so big and powerful that I'm not even sure
    we can keep DRM clean on open-source. Just look at all the closed-source
    codecs we're already forced to use if we want to access various media.
    If MS succeeds here then we'll be forced either to go along or to forego
    new music, videos, ebooks, and perhaps even web pages.

    So since we can't be sure of keeping it from evolving into something
    very very ugly, I will remain totally opposed to DRM in any form until
    such time as legal safeguards for consumers have already been put into
    place.

    >> Anyway, the open source community has a strong trend of providing the
    >> features that the users / customers want.

    >
    > On a reactive basis, I have yet to see any really proactive open source
    > features that are so compelling people start throwing there ms box's out
    > the window and deploying an open source alternative.


    Being designed to serve the user's needs, rather than the vendor's
    bottom line, is a pro-active OSS feature that MS can't match. :)
     
    techie, Oct 7, 2003
    #7
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