Drive Letter Problem - Vista Installation

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by cyranodesade@gmail.com, Oct 5, 2006.

  1. Guest

    All,
    I was wondering if anyone knows how to install Vista where the OS
    partition uses the D: Letter and not C:

    I normally install my OS as fallows:
    C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    D: Windows Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    E: Programs (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    F: Data Files (Logical Drive) (NTFS)

    I've gotten use to this structure and would like to continue it...
    however when I did my first install of Vista (I did it from my WinXP
    installation) Vista took the drive letter I had temporarily assigned
    the partition Z:. My second attempt was booting to the setup disk but
    Vista took the C: drive Letter and assigned the Primary Partition a
    drive letter of D:.

    I would like the install to be as followes:
    C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    D: Vista Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)

    I realize this is a little anal but... If anyone can help it will be
    much appreciated. Thanks in advance. - CES
     
    , Oct 5, 2006
    #1
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  2. Malke Guest

    wrote:

    > All,
    > I was wondering if anyone knows how to install Vista where the OS
    > partition uses the D: Letter and not C:
    >
    > I normally install my OS as fallows:
    > C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    > D: Windows Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    > E: Programs (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    > F: Data Files (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >
    > I've gotten use to this structure and would like to continue it...
    > however when I did my first install of Vista (I did it from my WinXP
    > installation) Vista took the drive letter I had temporarily assigned
    > the partition Z:. My second attempt was booting to the setup disk but
    > Vista took the C: drive Letter and assigned the Primary Partition a
    > drive letter of D:.
    >
    > I would like the install to be as followes:
    > C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    > D: Vista Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >
    > I realize this is a little anal but... If anyone can help it will be
    > much appreciated. Thanks in advance. - CES


    You should install the operating system the way you like. Ask your
    question in one of the Vista newsgroups, though.

    microsoft.public.windows.vista.general
    microsoft.public.windows.vista.administration_account
    microsoft.public.windows.vista.hardware_devices
    microsoft.public.windows.vista.installation_setup
    microsoft.public.windows.vista.mail
    microsoft.public.windows.vista.networking_sharing
    microsoft.public.windows.vista.performance_maintenance
    microsoft.public.windows.vista.print_fax_scan
    microsoft.public.windows.vista.security

    Malke
    --
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic!"
    MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
     
    Malke, Oct 5, 2006
    #2
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  3. wrote:

    > I was wondering if anyone knows how to install Vista where the OS
    > partition uses the D: Letter and not C:
    >
    > I normally install my OS as fallows:
    > C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    > D: Windows Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    > E: Programs (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    > F: Data Files (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >
    > I've gotten use to this structure and would like to continue it...



    I don't have enough experience with Vista to reply to your question, but I'd
    like to comment on the structure that you apparently like.

    First, you say say you put the Temp directory (page file) on C:. If that
    means you think the temp directory is the same as the page file, you are
    very much mistaken; they are two different things.

    Second, putting either the page file or the temp folder on a the same
    physical drive as Windows, but in a different partition, is
    counterproductive The thing that most slows down use of the page file is
    moving the drive heads to and from it. Putting the page file on a second
    partition on your only (or main) drive puts it far from the other
    frequently-used data on the drive, increases the time it takes to get to and
    from it, and negatively impacts performance.

    Putting the page file on another *physical* drive, on the other hand,
    normally increases performance. A good rule of thumb is that the page file
    should be on the most-used partition of the least-used physical drive.

    The same is true of the temp folder.

    Third, separating installed programs on a partition different from the one
    Windows is installed on is usually done by people who think that if they
    ever have to reinstall Windows, they will at least be able to keep their
    programs. However this is not true. Except for an occasional very small
    simple program, all programs have entries referring to them in the registry
    (as well as elsewhere). If you reinstall Windows, all those entries are
    lost, and the program won't work For that reason there is generally no
    benefit in such separation.

    Separating data from Windows can be useful for many people. My view is that
    most people's partitioning scheme should be based on their backup scheme.
    If, for example, you backup by creating a clone or image on the entire
    drive, then a single partition might be best. If, on the other hand, you
    backup only your data, then the backup process is facilitated by having all
    data in a separate partition.

    Rarely, if ever, does a partioning scheme with more than two partitions make
    sense, except for those running multiple operating systems.

    Realize that any time you create more partitions than you actually need, you
    aare creating artificial size boundaries that don't need to exist. Folder
    boundaries dynamically grow and shrink as needed to meet your changing
    needs, but partition boundaries are static and fixed (and require special
    software to change). That means that every time you have an extra partition
    that doesn't help you, you run the risk of running out of space on one
    partition while still having lots of room left on others. This risk should
    be run only if the partition structure is one that's beneficial, but not for
    trivial reasons.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
     
    Ken Blake, MVP, Oct 5, 2006
    #3
  4. Ken,

    I agree with most of this, the OP's set-up is really strange. But I think
    there is more determination than misconception behind this - the TEMP (TMP)
    directory is not of much use in the Windows world wheras in UNIX it is one
    of the core system directories. I guess CES has developed a kind of specific
    use for this. To absolutely want to have it on the C: partition, though?

    I have experimented a lot with the Swap File over many Windows versions. To
    put it on the most used partition of the least used drive is a new one to
    me. This is interesting, have to try that. What I have found to be most
    important is to put the swap file on the fastest drive. Then, I usually make
    a rather small swapfile on the system partition, and one of the recommended
    size on each of the other partitions that I have found to be required.

    Two partitions is mostly too little, I think. At least for a Home Desktop
    Machine. For Back-Up and recovery purposes using CD's and DVD's, I think
    that would put a strain on the Back-Up planning. ( or, MY B/U planning! )

    There are many misconceptions about the swapfile, I think. It used to be
    that no data is ever swapped - if it becomes redundant, it is dumped. Code
    is swapped! If data was put on the swapfile it would become overused and the
    whole purpose of having one would be defeated. This means that most of the
    conceptions that are floating around about the swapfile and it's use is
    mythology. Many are aggravated about the amount of space that it eats, but
    what is the eaqual of your average RAM to your average HD space? It simply
    is meaningless. The system itself probably uses the swapfile the most, but
    there is no benefit in reserving huge space there since the information that
    is stored is already of a volatile nature and can be overwritten without
    much impact after a few minutes, large applications may use it less often
    but most likely with more roomy material that may be expected to have a
    longer duration - so, as I said - I have found a small system partition
    swapfile usefull and one larger but secondary swapfile on each of the other
    partitions. And the system partition (C: drive!) on the fastest drive, if
    possible.

    Everybody today is speaking of how the system swaps data, if this has
    changed ( old habbits do that ) please correct me, I simply cannot keep up
    with the pace of change everywhere.


    Tony. . .
     
    Tony Sperling, Oct 5, 2006
    #4
  5. Tony Sperling wrote:

    > I have experimented a lot with the Swap File over many Windows
    > versions. To put it on the most used partition of the least used
    > drive is a new one to me. This is interesting, have to try that.



    Again, the thing that most slows down use of the page file is moving the
    drive heads to and from it.


    > What
    > I have found to be most important is to put the swap file on the
    > fastest drive.



    Since most people have only a single drive, that isn't usually an issue, and
    even if they have more than one, they are usually identical.

    But in cases where you have two dissimilar drives, I'll grant you that using
    the faster one is an advantage. Whether that advantage outweighs the
    advantage of having it on the least-used physical drive (and thereby
    minimizing head movement) is another story. It perhaps depends on how much
    faster than the other drive(s) it is.

    My guess is that in more cases than not, having it on the least-used drive
    is more significant, but I certainly wouldn't object to someone trying it
    both ways to which which wored better in *his* situation.

    But over and above all of this, these days, most of us have enough RAM so
    that page file use is very low, and in practice, where you put it just isn't
    as important as it used to be.


    > Two partitions is mostly too little, I think. At least for a Home
    > Desktop Machine. For Back-Up and recovery purposes using CD's and
    > DVD's, I think that would put a strain on the Back-Up planning. ( or,
    > MY B/U planning! )



    That depends on your backup strategy. I'm not particularly fond of backing
    up to CD/DVD. My strategy, and the one I normally recommend, is imaging the
    entire drive to an external hard drive. In that scenario, even a single
    partition will work fine for most people.



    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
     
    Ken Blake, MVP, Oct 5, 2006
    #5
  6. Hello,
    Windows Vista Setup defaults to installing to the C drive if you boot from
    the DVD.
    You start setup from with-in another version of Windows, drive lettering is
    retained.
    You can use an unattended file to install to a drive letter other than C:
    if you boot to the DVD, there isn't an option if you are booting to a DVD
    other than using an unattended file to assign the drive letters.
    Thanks,
    Darrell Gorter[MSFT]

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights
    --------------------
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    <
    <All,
    <I was wondering if anyone knows how to install Vista where the OS
    <partition uses the D: Letter and not C:
    <
    <I normally install my OS as fallows:
    <C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    <D: Windows Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    <E: Programs (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    <F: Data Files (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    <
    <I've gotten use to this structure and would like to continue it...
    <however when I did my first install of Vista (I did it from my WinXP
    <installation) Vista took the drive letter I had temporarily assigned
    <the partition Z:. My second attempt was booting to the setup disk but
    <Vista took the C: drive Letter and assigned the Primary Partition a
    <drive letter of D:.
    <
    <I would like the install to be as followes:
    <C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    <D: Vista Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    <
    <I realize this is a little anal but... If anyone can help it will be
    <much appreciated. Thanks in advance. - CES
    <
    <
     
    Darrell Gorter[MSFT], Oct 5, 2006
    #6
  7. Rock Guest

    <> wrote

    > All,
    > I was wondering if anyone knows how to install Vista where the OS
    > partition uses the D: Letter and not C:
    >
    > I normally install my OS as fallows:
    > C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    > D: Windows Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    > E: Programs (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    > F: Data Files (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >
    > I've gotten use to this structure and would like to continue it...
    > however when I did my first install of Vista (I did it from my WinXP
    > installation) Vista took the drive letter I had temporarily assigned
    > the partition Z:. My second attempt was booting to the setup disk but
    > Vista took the C: drive Letter and assigned the Primary Partition a
    > drive letter of D:.
    >
    > I would like the install to be as followes:
    > C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    > D: Vista Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >
    > I realize this is a little anal but... If anyone can help it will be
    > much appreciated. Thanks in advance



    Post to a vista newsgroup.

    news://msnews.microsoft.com/microsoft.public.windows.vista.general

    Or on the web
    http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/en-us/default.mspx

    --

    Rock [ MVP User/Shell]
     
    Rock, Oct 6, 2006
    #7
  8. This IS a Vista newsgroup. Anyone with 64bit questions may post here
    regardless of the platform. This ng is platform agnostic.

    "Rock" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > <> wrote
    >
    >> All,
    >> I was wondering if anyone knows how to install Vista where the OS
    >> partition uses the D: Letter and not C:
    >>
    >> I normally install my OS as fallows:
    >> C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    >> D: Windows Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >> E: Programs (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >> F: Data Files (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >>
    >> I've gotten use to this structure and would like to continue it...
    >> however when I did my first install of Vista (I did it from my WinXP
    >> installation) Vista took the drive letter I had temporarily assigned
    >> the partition Z:. My second attempt was booting to the setup disk but
    >> Vista took the C: drive Letter and assigned the Primary Partition a
    >> drive letter of D:.
    >>
    >> I would like the install to be as followes:
    >> C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    >> D: Vista Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >>
    >> I realize this is a little anal but... If anyone can help it will be
    >> much appreciated. Thanks in advance

    >
    >
    > Post to a vista newsgroup.
    > news://msnews.microsoft.com/microsoft.public.windows.vista.general
    >
    > Or on the web
    > http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/en-us/default.mspx
    >
    > --
    >
    > Rock [ MVP User/Shell]
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Oct 7, 2006
    #8
  9. Rock Guest

    "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(remove)@msn.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > This IS a Vista newsgroup. Anyone with 64bit questions may post here
    > regardless of the platform. This ng is platform agnostic.
    >
    > "Rock" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> <> wrote
    >>
    >>> All,
    >>> I was wondering if anyone knows how to install Vista where the OS
    >>> partition uses the D: Letter and not C:
    >>>
    >>> I normally install my OS as fallows:
    >>> C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    >>> D: Windows Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >>> E: Programs (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >>> F: Data Files (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >>>
    >>> I've gotten use to this structure and would like to continue it...
    >>> however when I did my first install of Vista (I did it from my WinXP
    >>> installation) Vista took the drive letter I had temporarily assigned
    >>> the partition Z:. My second attempt was booting to the setup disk but
    >>> Vista took the C: drive Letter and assigned the Primary Partition a
    >>> drive letter of D:.
    >>>
    >>> I would like the install to be as followes:
    >>> C: temp directory (page File) (Primary Partition) (Fat32)
    >>> D: Vista Directory (Logical Drive) (NTFS)
    >>>
    >>> I realize this is a little anal but... If anyone can help it will be
    >>> much appreciated. Thanks in advance

    >>
    >>
    >> Post to a vista newsgroup.
    >> news://msnews.microsoft.com/microsoft.public.windows.vista.general
    >>
    >> Or on the web
    >> http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/en-us/default.mspx
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Rock [ MVP User/Shell]

    >
    >



    Lol...missed seeing that. Oh well.

    --

    Rock [ MVP User/Shell]
     
    Rock, Oct 7, 2006
    #9
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