Draining the laptop battery

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Starstuffed, Oct 23, 2003.

  1. Starstuffed

    Starstuffed Guest

    I have a Compaq 1540DM and really don't have any problems with it but am
    curious about something. I read that the charge in the battery should be
    depleted every so often to maximize the battery life and its ability to
    power the laptop for as long as possible between charges. My question is
    this: how totally should the battery be discharged? If I run it down to 3
    percent of its charge before starting a recharge, is that sufficiently
    drained? If I drain it all the way down to a zero charge and the computer
    dies will I lose any information stored in the computer?

    Thanks,


    Martin
     
    Starstuffed, Oct 23, 2003
    #1
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  2. Starstuffed

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Starstuffed wrote:

    > I have a Compaq 1540DM and really don't have any problems with it but am
    > curious about something. I read that the charge in the battery should be
    > depleted every so often to maximize the battery life and its ability to
    > power the laptop for as long as possible between charges. My question is
    > this: how totally should the battery be discharged? If I run it down to 3
    > percent of its charge before starting a recharge, is that sufficiently
    > drained?


    Yes. I will take mine to 10 Minutes left about every 6 weeks.

    > If I drain it all the way down to a zero charge and the computer
    > dies will I lose any information stored in the computer?


    That's possible, except your power control logic should shut it
    down forcibly before it dies. - RM
     
    Rick Merrill, Oct 23, 2003
    #2
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  3. Starstuffed

    mhicaoidh Guest

    Taking a moment's reflection, Starstuffed mused:
    |
    | I have a Compaq 1540DM and really don't have any problems with it but am
    | curious about something. I read that the charge in the battery should be
    | depleted every so often to maximize the battery life and its ability to
    | power the laptop for as long as possible between charges.

    I use a program called Prime95. It has a Torture Test setting that
    calculates Prime numbers, and drains the battery fairly quickly. I run it
    every two weeks, and I don't leave my battery in my laptop when in use
    (unless I need the battery). I run Prime95's Torture Test until the laptop
    shuts itself off. Then I recharge the battery, and do it again. After the
    second recharge, I take the battery out and put it back in my laptop case.
    Overkill? Maybe. ;-)
     
    mhicaoidh, Oct 24, 2003
    #3
  4. I have a Gateway 5300, and it has a battery discharge feature in the bios,
    (found it when I used the F2 key on bootup) works great.
    As far as the draining, you need to take the battery to 0%,
    for it to maximize the battery life.
    And no it doesn't affect anything you have saved in the computer. It is like
    shutting your computer off for the night.
    --sexkitten--

    "Starstuffed" <> wrote in message
    news:ORYlb.3419$...
    > I have a Compaq 1540DM and really don't have any problems with it but am
    > curious about something. I read that the charge in the battery should be
    > depleted every so often to maximize the battery life and its ability to
    > power the laptop for as long as possible between charges. My question is
    > this: how totally should the battery be discharged? If I run it down to

    3
    > percent of its charge before starting a recharge, is that sufficiently
    > drained? If I drain it all the way down to a zero charge and the computer
    > dies will I lose any information stored in the computer?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    >
    > Martin
    >
    >
    >
     
    --sexkitten--, Oct 24, 2003
    #4
  5. Starstuffed

    Steve Knight Guest

    O
    My question is
    >this: how totally should the battery be discharged? If I run it down to 3
    >percent of its charge before starting a recharge, is that sufficiently
    >drained? If I drain it all the way down to a zero charge and the computer
    >dies will I lose any information stored in the computer?


    if it is a lithium ion type battery you will ruin it by draining it.

    From GE Tech Notes ....

    "Among the many users of batteries in both the industrial and consumer
    sectors, the idea of a memory phenomenon in nickel-cadmium batteries has been
    widely misused and understood. The term 'memory' has become a catch-all
    'buzzword' that is used to describe a raft of application problems, being most
    often confused with simple voltage depression.

    "To the well informed, however, 'memory' is a term applied to a specific
    phenomenon encountered very infrequently in field applications. Specifically,
    the term 'memory' came from an aerospace nickel-cadmium application in which the
    cells were repeatedly discharged to 25% of available capacity (plus or minus 1%)
    by exacting computer control, then recharged to 100% capacity WITHOUT OVERCHARGE
    [emphasis in the original]. This long term, repetitive cycle regime, with no
    provisions for overcharge, resulted in a loss of capacity beyond the 25%
    discharge point. Hence the birth of a "memory" phenomenon, whereby
    nickel-cadmium batteries purportedly lose capacity if repeatedly discharged to a
    specific level of capacity.

    "The 'memory' phenomenon observed in this original aerospace application was
    eliminated by simply reprogramming the computer to allow for overcharging. [Note
    that no mention is made of adding an intentional *discharge* to clear the
    problem - RLM] In fact, 'memory' is always a completely reversible condition;
    even in those rare cases where 'memory' cannot be avoided, it can easily be
    erased. Unfortunately, the idea of memory-related loss of capacity has been with
    us since. Realistically, however, ' memory' cannot exist if any one of the
    following conditions holds:

    1. Batteries achieve full overcharge.
    2. Discharge is not exactly the same each cycle - plus or minus 2-3%
    3. Discharge is to less than 1.0 volt per cell.

    "Remember, the existence of any ONE of these conditions eliminates the
    possibility of 'memory'. GE has not verified true 'memory' in any field
    application with the single exception of the satellite application noted above.
    Lack of empirical evidence notwithstanding, 'memory' is still blamed regularly
    for poor battery performance that is caused by a number of simple, correctable
    application problems."

    End of quote ... Basically memory (loss of capacity) due to discharge is a myth.


    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
    See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
    Steve Knight, Oct 24, 2003
    #5
  6. I stand corrected, even learned something new. :)
    I am assuming from your quote, and please correct me if I am wrong, The
    function I found in the bios for draining the battery is almost a throwback
    when batteries had the memory problem, and just to be used if the battery
    does have a memory.

    "Steve Knight" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > O
    > My question is
    > >this: how totally should the battery be discharged? If I run it down to

    3
    > >percent of its charge before starting a recharge, is that sufficiently
    > >drained? If I drain it all the way down to a zero charge and the

    computer
    > >dies will I lose any information stored in the computer?

    >
    > if it is a lithium ion type battery you will ruin it by draining it.
    >
    > From GE Tech Notes ....
    >
    > "Among the many users of batteries in both the industrial and consumer
    > sectors, the idea of a memory phenomenon in nickel-cadmium batteries has

    been
    > widely misused and understood. The term 'memory' has become a catch-all
    > 'buzzword' that is used to describe a raft of application problems, being

    most
    > often confused with simple voltage depression.
    >
    > "To the well informed, however, 'memory' is a term applied to a

    specific
    > phenomenon encountered very infrequently in field applications.

    Specifically,
    > the term 'memory' came from an aerospace nickel-cadmium application in

    which the
    > cells were repeatedly discharged to 25% of available capacity (plus or

    minus 1%)
    > by exacting computer control, then recharged to 100% capacity WITHOUT

    OVERCHARGE
    > [emphasis in the original]. This long term, repetitive cycle regime, with

    no
    > provisions for overcharge, resulted in a loss of capacity beyond the 25%
    > discharge point. Hence the birth of a "memory" phenomenon, whereby
    > nickel-cadmium batteries purportedly lose capacity if repeatedly

    discharged to a
    > specific level of capacity.
    >
    > "The 'memory' phenomenon observed in this original aerospace

    application was
    > eliminated by simply reprogramming the computer to allow for overcharging.

    [Note
    > that no mention is made of adding an intentional *discharge* to clear the
    > problem - RLM] In fact, 'memory' is always a completely reversible

    condition;
    > even in those rare cases where 'memory' cannot be avoided, it can easily

    be
    > erased. Unfortunately, the idea of memory-related loss of capacity has

    been with
    > us since. Realistically, however, ' memory' cannot exist if any one of the
    > following conditions holds:
    >
    > 1. Batteries achieve full overcharge.
    > 2. Discharge is not exactly the same each cycle - plus or minus

    2-3%
    > 3. Discharge is to less than 1.0 volt per cell.
    >
    > "Remember, the existence of any ONE of these conditions eliminates the
    > possibility of 'memory'. GE has not verified true 'memory' in any field
    > application with the single exception of the satellite application noted

    above.
    > Lack of empirical evidence notwithstanding, 'memory' is still blamed

    regularly
    > for poor battery performance that is caused by a number of simple,

    correctable
    > application problems."
    >
    > End of quote ... Basically memory (loss of capacity) due to discharge is a

    myth.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    > Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
    > See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
    --sexkitten--, Oct 24, 2003
    #6
  7. Starstuffed

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 21:41:52 -0700, "--sexkitten--" <> wrote:

    >I stand corrected, even learned something new. :)
    >I am assuming from your quote, and please correct me if I am wrong, The
    >function I found in the bios for draining the battery is almost a throwback
    >when batteries had the memory problem, and just to be used if the battery
    >does have a memory.
    >

    it seems to be.
    I remember draining my RC batteries. I never tried it without draining them.
    but they were pushed nard charged in 15 minutes and drained in three.
    but the newer batteries will be damaged if they are drained.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
    See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
    Steve Knight, Oct 24, 2003
    #7
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