Downloaded Any Movies Lately? - Spy Software Will Soon Track You Down

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by E. Scrooge, Aug 26, 2006.

  1. E. Scrooge

    E. Scrooge Guest

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3777308a11,00.html

    Only Orcon and ihug have said they wouldn't give up information without a
    court warrant, in the end holding out won't make much difference though.

    Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal computers is
    to be used in New Zealand.

    With big brother watching and treating everyone like criminals the best
    thing to do is stop going to the movie theatres as a protest that everyone
    in the country doesn't appreciate being spyed on.

    If people stopped going to the movies they'd lose a damn sight more than
    $150,000 a year. Just buy the retail DVDs instead, it will still hurt the
    buggers behind the spyware. Buy a projector and you've got your own good
    movie theatre anyway.

    E. Scrooge
     
    E. Scrooge, Aug 26, 2006
    #1
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  2. E. Scrooge

    Chris Lim Guest

    E. Scrooge (*sling) wrote:
    > Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal computers is
    > to be used in New Zealand.


    Does anyone know how this software would work? The article in the paper
    said it searches the search engines, but I would've thought that most
    people go to sites like mininova.org to find torrents? I hardly think
    they are going to give away ip addresses!

    And kinda strange how they say they will send out a warning letter
    first. Knowing that, why on earth would anyone stop what they're doing
    until they receive such a warning letter?
     
    Chris Lim, Aug 26, 2006
    #2
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  3. E. Scrooge

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "Chris Lim" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > E. Scrooge (*sling) wrote:
    >> Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal computers
    >> is
    >> to be used in New Zealand.

    >
    > Does anyone know how this software would work? The article in the paper
    > said it searches the search engines, but I would've thought that most
    > people go to sites like mininova.org to find torrents? I hardly think
    > they are going to give away ip addresses!
    >
    > And kinda strange how they say they will send out a warning letter
    > first. Knowing that, why on earth would anyone stop what they're doing
    > until they receive such a warning letter?


    Guessing but it either uses NZ ISPs or is able detect the use of
    Google.co.nz. If it uses NZ ISPs and finds anything then it would have to
    get information from the ISP who the id belongs to.

    As the report said if the computer is shared in the flat then it would be
    the account holder that gets in the shit if an illegal movie download is
    detected.

    They only claim they will send a warning letter, even if they did and they
    found the person was still downloading movies or even TV programs as well
    most likely then that person would be dragged off to court.

    The report mentions the mass pirate Houston, but on the scale he was doing
    it he was hardly relying on downloads from the Internet. He could've been
    importing pirated DVD copies then making hundreds of copies from them.

    They're going to spy on everyone just to try to catch a few large fish which
    more than likely import illegal DVDs to copy.

    The best protest of the privacy invasion is to stop going to the movie
    theatres. If enough people did that it cost them a few million at least a
    year.

    E. Scrooge
     
    E. Scrooge, Aug 26, 2006
    #3
  4. E. Scrooge

    Shane Guest

    Chris Lim wrote:

    > E. Scrooge (*sling) wrote:
    >> Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal computers
    >> is to be used in New Zealand.

    >
    > Does anyone know how this software would work? The article in the paper
    > said it searches the search engines, but I would've thought that most
    > people go to sites like mininova.org to find torrents? I hardly think
    > they are going to give away ip addresses!
    >
    > And kinda strange how they say they will send out a warning letter
    > first. Knowing that, why on earth would anyone stop what they're doing
    > until they receive such a warning letter?


    Heh " Google searches and other download attempts "
    Since when is a google search a download attempt?


    --
    Rule 6: There is no rule 6

    Blog: http://shanes.dyndns.org
     
    Shane, Aug 26, 2006
    #4
  5. T'was the 26 Aug 2006 00:32:57 -0700 when I remembered "Chris Lim"
    <> saying something like this:

    >Does anyone know how this software would work? The article in the paper
    >said it searches the search engines, but I would've thought that most
    >people go to sites like mininova.org to find torrents? I hardly think
    >they are going to give away ip addresses!


    It wouldn't surprise me if there was a rise of Freenet style P2P
    applications.
    --
    Cheers,

    Waylon Kenning.
     
    Waylon Kenning, Aug 26, 2006
    #5
  6. Waylon Kenning wrote:

    >
    > It wouldn't surprise me if there was a rise of Freenet style P2P
    > applications.


    Tsk,tsk,giving innocent old horis, ideas.
    --
    grumpy
     
    grumpyoldhori, Aug 26, 2006
    #6
  7. E. Scrooge

    Peter Guest

    Chris Lim wrote:
    > E. Scrooge (*sling) wrote:
    >> Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal computers
    >> is to be used in New Zealand.

    > Does anyone know how this software would work?


    I wonder if the journalist has got it wrong, and the media corporates are
    actually just examining bittorrent trackers. This would give them IP
    addresses of boxes downloading known files.

    They still have to be very careful, as IP addresses for most users are
    dynamic. If someone who is downloading files, rebooted their router on a
    regular basis, they would end up using a number of IP addresses, making it
    quite likely that an innocent party will get attacked through the courts
    (as has already happened in USA).


    Peter
     
    Peter, Aug 26, 2006
    #7
  8. T'was the Sat, 26 Aug 2006 20:50:37 +1200 when I remembered Shane
    <-a-geek.net> saying something like this:

    >Heh " Google searches and other download attempts "
    >Since when is a google search a download attempt?


    We are dealing with the RIAA like industry bodies. I'm sure they'll
    find a way to connect the dots.

    Does this mean everyone's going to go back to IRC to get their share
    of porn and warez?
    --
    Cheers,

    Waylon Kenning.
     
    Waylon Kenning, Aug 26, 2006
    #8
  9. T'was the Sat, 26 Aug 2006 21:59:12 +1200 when I remembered Peter
    <> saying something like this:

    >They still have to be very careful, as IP addresses for most users are
    >dynamic. If someone who is downloading files, rebooted their router on a
    >regular basis, they would end up using a number of IP addresses, making it
    >quite likely that an innocent party will get attacked through the courts
    >(as has already happened in USA).


    Here's an interesting question. There's four computers in my household
    sharing the one internet connection. Let's say one of these computers
    is downloading illegal files. Who's in trouble? I, as the internet
    connection owner? The one downloading the files as the person doing
    the act? Would this make me just a facilitator?
    --
    Cheers,

    Waylon Kenning.
     
    Waylon Kenning, Aug 26, 2006
    #9
  10. E. Scrooge

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Re: Downloaded Any Movies Lately? - Spy Software Will Soon TrackYou Down

    Peter wrote:
    > Chris Lim wrote:
    >> E. Scrooge (*sling) wrote:
    >>> Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal computers
    >>> is to be used in New Zealand.

    >> Does anyone know how this software would work?

    >
    > I wonder if the journalist has got it wrong, and the media corporates are
    > actually just examining bittorrent trackers. This would give them IP
    > addresses of boxes downloading known files.


    I'm sure that will be what is happening.

    >
    > They still have to be very careful, as IP addresses for most users are
    > dynamic. If someone who is downloading files, rebooted their router on a
    > regular basis, they would end up using a number of IP addresses, making it
    > quite likely that an innocent party will get attacked through the courts
    > (as has already happened in USA).


    The ISP correlates the time of the alleged offence with the IP address
    logged and provides the necessary details (or maybe contacts the
    customer directly).

    Hopefully the latter, though why they should feel obliged to help a
    foreign company do their work for them, I don't know.

    A recent case in (I think, the UK) the ISP refused to supply the details
    because the MAFIAA's agent hadn't specified what timezone had been used
    to specify the time of the alleged offence.
     
    -=rjh=-, Aug 26, 2006
    #10
  11. In message <ecp1vf$8bg$>, Shane wrote:

    > Chris Lim wrote:
    >
    >> E. Scrooge (*sling) wrote:
    >>> Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal
    >>> computers is to be used in New Zealand.

    >>
    >> Does anyone know how this software would work? The article in the paper
    >> said it searches the search engines, but I would've thought that most
    >> people go to sites like mininova.org to find torrents? I hardly think
    >> they are going to give away ip addresses!
    >>
    >> And kinda strange how they say they will send out a warning letter
    >> first. Knowing that, why on earth would anyone stop what they're doing
    >> until they receive such a warning letter?

    >
    > Heh " Google searches and other download attempts "
    > Since when is a google search a download attempt?


    Since the case with 2600 Magazine a few years ago when the court forbade
    them from putting links on their Web site to where you could download the
    DeCSS code, since the judge ruled that linking to something that allowed
    copyright infringement was itself copyright infringement.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 26, 2006
    #11
  12. E. Scrooge

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Re: Downloaded Any Movies Lately? - Spy Software Will Soon TrackYou Down

    E. Scrooge wrote:
    > http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3777308a11,00.html
    >
    > Only Orcon and ihug have said they wouldn't give up information without a
    > court warrant, in the end holding out won't make much difference though.
    >
    > Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal computers is
    > to be used in New Zealand.
    >
    > With big brother watching and treating everyone like criminals the best
    > thing to do is stop going to the movie theatres as a protest that everyone
    > in the country doesn't appreciate being spyed on.
    >
    > If people stopped going to the movies they'd lose a damn sight more than
    > $150,000 a year. Just buy the retail DVDs instead, it will still hurt the
    > buggers behind the spyware. Buy a projector and you've got your own good
    > movie theatre anyway.


    But don't forget to do heaps of searching for all the popular titles;
    but don't download anything. It isn't illegal to search is it? (Unless
    related to terrorism, of course).

    A couple of failed cases would throw a spanner in the works.
     
    -=rjh=-, Aug 26, 2006
    #12
  13. E. Scrooge

    s-t-e-v-e Guest

    Re: Downloaded Any Movies Lately? - Spy Software Will Soon TrackYou Down

    E. Scrooge wrote:

    > Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal computers is
    > to be used in New Zealand.


    Illegal....and probably targeting Windows PCs.
     
    s-t-e-v-e, Aug 26, 2006
    #13
  14. E. Scrooge

    Craig Shore Guest

    On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 20:26:19 +1200, "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)>
    wrote:

    >The report mentions the mass pirate Houston, but on the scale he was doing
    >it he was hardly relying on downloads from the Internet. He could've been
    >importing pirated DVD copies then making hundreds of copies from them.


    In that part it also said
    "Judge David Harvey described it as a highly sophisticated operation in which
    Houston used decrypting programmes to get around encryption codes on compact
    discs aimed at stopping movies being copied."

    I take it that means decss, which is built into a lot of programs and while it
    may be sophisticated, for the end user it's usually as simple as pop the DVD in
    and press the start button.
    And the above says "Compact Discs"? Wouldn't they mean DVDs?
     
    Craig Shore, Aug 26, 2006
    #14
  15. E. Scrooge

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "Craig Shore" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 20:26:19 +1200, "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz
    > (*sling)>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>The report mentions the mass pirate Houston, but on the scale he was doing
    >>it he was hardly relying on downloads from the Internet. He could've been
    >>importing pirated DVD copies then making hundreds of copies from them.

    >
    > In that part it also said
    > "Judge David Harvey described it as a highly sophisticated operation in
    > which
    > Houston used decrypting programmes to get around encryption codes on
    > compact
    > discs aimed at stopping movies being copied."
    >
    > I take it that means decss, which is built into a lot of programs and
    > while it
    > may be sophisticated, for the end user it's usually as simple as pop the
    > DVD in
    > and press the start button.
    > And the above says "Compact Discs"? Wouldn't they mean DVDs?


    Could be just a poor translation by the court, could've just been using the
    cheap single layer DVDRs.

    E. Scrooge
     
    E. Scrooge, Aug 26, 2006
    #15
  16. E. Scrooge

    Shane Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > In message <ecp1vf$8bg$>, Shane wrote:
    >
    >> Chris Lim wrote:
    >>
    >>> E. Scrooge (*sling) wrote:
    >>>> Software capable of powerful and intrusive searches of personal
    >>>> computers is to be used in New Zealand.
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone know how this software would work? The article in the paper
    >>> said it searches the search engines, but I would've thought that most
    >>> people go to sites like mininova.org to find torrents? I hardly think
    >>> they are going to give away ip addresses!
    >>>
    >>> And kinda strange how they say they will send out a warning letter
    >>> first. Knowing that, why on earth would anyone stop what they're doing
    >>> until they receive such a warning letter?

    >>
    >> Heh " Google searches and other download attempts "
    >> Since when is a google search a download attempt?

    >
    > Since the case with 2600 Magazine a few years ago when the court forbade
    > them from putting links on their Web site to where you could download the
    > DeCSS code, since the judge ruled that linking to something that allowed
    > copyright infringement was itself copyright infringement.



    I could see Google being in hot water, for providing the link, but me for
    looking?

    --
    Rule 6: There is no rule 6

    Blog: http://shanes.dyndns.org
     
    Shane, Aug 26, 2006
    #16
  17. E. Scrooge

    Shane Guest

    Waylon Kenning wrote:

    > T'was the Sat, 26 Aug 2006 20:50:37 +1200 when I remembered Shane
    > <-a-geek.net> saying something like this:
    >
    >>Heh " Google searches and other download attempts "
    >>Since when is a google search a download attempt?

    >
    > We are dealing with the RIAA like industry bodies. I'm sure they'll
    > find a way to connect the dots.
    >
    > Does this mean everyone's going to go back to IRC to get their share
    > of porn and warez?


    j00 can get juares on eye are see????

    --
    Rule 6: There is no rule 6

    Blog: http://shanes.dyndns.org
     
    Shane, Aug 26, 2006
    #17
  18. E. Scrooge

    Shane Guest

    *sling wrote:

    >
    > "Craig Shore" <> wrote in message
    > news:eek:...
    >> On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 20:26:19 +1200, "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz
    >> (*sling)>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>The report mentions the mass pirate Houston, but on the scale he was
    >>>doing
    >>>it he was hardly relying on downloads from the Internet. He could've
    >>>been importing pirated DVD copies then making hundreds of copies from
    >>>them.

    >>
    >> In that part it also said
    >> "Judge David Harvey described it as a highly sophisticated operation in
    >> which
    >> Houston used decrypting programmes to get around encryption codes on
    >> compact
    >> discs aimed at stopping movies being copied."
    >>
    >> I take it that means decss, which is built into a lot of programs and
    >> while it
    >> may be sophisticated, for the end user it's usually as simple as pop the
    >> DVD in
    >> and press the start button.
    >> And the above says "Compact Discs"? Wouldn't they mean DVDs?

    >
    > Could be just a poor translation by the court, could've just been using
    > the cheap single layer DVDRs.
    >
    > E. Scrooge



    Could have just been using a vivid :)
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2002/05/14/marker_pens_sticky_tape_crack/
    --
    Rule 6: There is no rule 6

    Blog: http://shanes.dyndns.org
     
    Shane, Aug 26, 2006
    #18
  19. E. Scrooge

    Guest

    Waylon Kenning wrote:
    > Here's an interesting question. There's four computers in my household
    > sharing the one internet connection. Let's say one of these computers
    > is downloading illegal files. Who's in trouble? I, as the internet
    > connection owner?


    Yes, they'd probably use a massive legal attack against the person who has
    the account with the ISP. Then they'd settle after you pay them all your
    life savings (it would be cheaper for you than fighting a long legal
    battle). Whether you are guilty or not doesn't really matter, it is the
    deterrent factor they want.

    Just as with terrorists, whose aim is to instill fear and terror in the
    general population, and the victims on planes etc are merely collateral
    damage.
    Same for the big media corporates. They can't hope to prosecute every
    individual who might sample a new artist on the net, or copy a CD to play
    in the car. Instead, they make a lot of noise about dire consequences for
    a small number they randomly pick on, with the aim of instilling fear and
    terror in the general public, so as to make them docile, compliant
    purchasers, willing to forgo their rights to fair use of creative
    materials.

    Rather sad, really. Surely it would be a much better business model if
    they'd just treat their customers with respect.
    I'm not condoning crooks who rip off products, by selling unauthorised
    copies. Of course, these crooks don't need to download stuff. They can
    just buy one legit dvd, or copy one from their acquaintances. Then make
    hundreds of copies to sell at markets or car boot sales. These crooks need
    to be booked.


    Peter
     
    , Aug 26, 2006
    #19
  20. T'was the Sun, 27 Aug 2006 08:01:06 +1200 when I remembered Shane
    <-a-geek.net> saying something like this:

    >> We are dealing with the RIAA like industry bodies. I'm sure they'll
    >> find a way to connect the dots.
    >>
    >> Does this mean everyone's going to go back to IRC to get their share
    >> of porn and warez?

    >
    >j00 can get juares on eye are see????


    Yeah dude, latest releases of Starcraft, Quake, Photoshop 5, Windows
    98, it's all there man! See you on #crack3rs_0f_d00m on irc.1998.net
    :)
    --
    Cheers,

    Waylon Kenning.
     
    Waylon Kenning, Aug 26, 2006
    #20
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