Downgrade to XP question

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lodi, Dec 2, 2008.

  1. Lodi

    Lodi Guest

    Hi all... A friend of a friend was asking about how to downgrade an MSI
    laptop from Vista to XP.

    Is there an MS approved process to follow.

    Or do you go via MSI or the original retailer.

    I recall a "downgrade CD" being mentioned here a while ago. Are they
    freely available.

    Would hate to steer her wrong as she's moderately computer-phobic.

    Regards
    Lodi
     
    Lodi, Dec 2, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Lodi

    Squiggle Guest

    Lodi wrote:
    > Hi all... A friend of a friend was asking about how to downgrade an MSI
    > laptop from Vista to XP.
    >
    > Is there an MS approved process to follow.
    >
    > Or do you go via MSI or the original retailer.
    >
    > I recall a "downgrade CD" being mentioned here a while ago. Are they
    > freely available.
    >
    > Would hate to steer her wrong as she's moderately computer-phobic.
    >
    > Regards
    > Lodi


    It only (legally) applies to Vista business and Vista Ultimate I
    believe, not to any of the home versions AFAIK. And the downgrade is to
    XP pro not XP home.
    MS don't supply the media, you have to source that from the
    manufacturer, or a mate/torrent etc. (its intended for corporates that
    are trying to keep everyone on a homogenous platform, so its assumed
    they have install media already).
    Best bet is to go back to the shop and see if they have a spare XP Pro
    install disc for that laptop they can give/copy for you. That way it
    should have the drivers etc with it.
    After that there is just the issue of getting it activated.. I have
    heard that requires a phone call to MS to get an activation code.

    Or of course there is always the screw MS, I'll pirate it option. takes
    away the hassle of dealing with MS, but you might have to deal with
    warez sites and the viruses that go with that option instead. Its a
    50:50 call which is more hassle :)

    HTH.
     
    Squiggle, Dec 2, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Lodi

    Peter M Guest

    On Tue, 2 Dec 2008 08:59:27 +0100 (CET), Lodi <> wrote:

    >Hi all... A friend of a friend was asking about how to downgrade an MSI
    >laptop from Vista to XP.
    >
    >Is there an MS approved process to follow.
    >
    >Or do you go via MSI or the original retailer.
    >
    >I recall a "downgrade CD" being mentioned here a while ago. Are they
    >freely available.
    >
    >Would hate to steer her wrong as she's moderately computer-phobic.
    >
    >Regards
    >Lodi




    Only for the Pro version..
     
    Peter M, Dec 2, 2008
    #3
  4. Lodi

    Carnations Guest

    On Tue, 02 Dec 2008 08:59:27 +0100, Lodi wrote:

    > Hi all... A friend of a friend was asking about how to downgrade an MSI
    > laptop from Vista to XP.


    That is not a "downgrade" - that is actually an upgrade.

    Altho', if your friend really want to upgrade you'll move completely away
    from using MS Windows altogether.


    --
    Dilger: "Microsoft is first and foremost a marketing
    company that flogs third rate technology products."
     
    Carnations, Dec 2, 2008
    #4
  5. Lodi

    Enkidu Guest

    Carnations wrote:
    > On Tue, 02 Dec 2008 08:59:27 +0100, Lodi wrote:
    >
    >> Hi all... A friend of a friend was asking about how to downgrade an
    >> MSI laptop from Vista to XP.

    >
    > That is not a "downgrade" - that is actually an upgrade.
    >

    Technically it is a downgrade. A move to a newer version, no matter how
    bug-ridden is referred to as an upgrade, so a move to an older version
    is technically a downgrade. Even if the older version is better.

    For example, a move from one version of OpenSuSE to the next is
    technically an upgrade, though functionally it will be worse than the
    previous version.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    Tax is not theft.
     
    Enkidu, Dec 2, 2008
    #5
  6. Lodi

    Richard Guest

    PeeCee wrote:
    > There is unlikely to be an MSI approved process, but the 'usual' process
    > goes like this.
    >
    > 1 Go to the Laptop makers website and download a copy of the XP drivers
    > for that 'exact' model Laptop.
    > (Sound, Video, Motherboard, Modem, Wifi, etc. They will vary extensively
    > in number and form depending on the model)
    > Burn these drivers to CD.
    > 2 Backup the personal data on the Laptop.
    > 3 Ensure you have the restore disks for Vista that came with the Laptop.
    > This may entail burning them yourself from an Alll Programs Menu option
    > if there were no disks in the box.
    > Alternatively install something like Acronis True Image and create an
    > image of your Vista Hard drive to DVD's
    > 4 Reboot the Laptop and enter the Bios, set the CD/DVD drive as the
    > first boot device (it probably already is but it pays to check)
    > 5 Put the XP setup CD in the CD/DVD drive and reboot the Laptop.
    > 6 Follow the instructions on screen to install a base install of XP,
    > replacing the current Vista install.
    > 7 After XP has rebooted and finshed installing insert your driver CD and
    > install the hardware drivers.
    > 8 Install an AntiVirus program.
    > 9 Connect to the Internet and start downloading a) AntiVirus updates
    > b)Windows XP updates.
    > The number of XP updates will depend on the service pack number of your
    > XP install CD
    > 10 Install any applications like word processors, games, accountancy
    > suites etc.
    > 11 Restore your personal data.


    Sadly its not that easy, you will have to either find a USB floppy drive
    and put the sata drivers onto a floppy and press f6 during install, or
    else slipstream them to the install image and then burn that.
     
    Richard, Dec 3, 2008
    #6
  7. Lodi

    Richard Guest

    PeeCee wrote:

    > Not necessarily true for late model chipsets.
    > Bios's these days have IDE emulation for SATA drives, though I'm more
    > familiar with desktop motherboards rather than Laptop.
    > But a consideration all the same.
    >
    > The above 11 point 'method' should be enough for a competent technically
    > oriented person to make the change.
    > Hopefully it is also enough to make the less skilled realise they are
    > out of their depth.


    The thing is, that it will be set to ahci by default and changing it off
    this is just disabling the command queuing which can be very beneficial
    when it starts to thrash the swap file IME.
     
    Richard, Dec 3, 2008
    #7
  8. Lodi

    Carnations Guest

    On Wed, 03 Dec 2008 09:19:50 +1300, Enkidu wrote:

    > Technically it is a downgrade. A move to a newer version, no matter how
    > bug-ridden is referred to as an upgrade, so a move to an older version
    > is technically a downgrade. Even if the older version is better.


    A move to a better version is an upgrade. A move to an inferior version
    is a downgrade.

    While you're correct about the numerical nature of the progression, when
    it comes to the actual quality of the version in question, if a previous
    version is in fact has better features and higher quality of
    implementation, then moving to a lower numerical version is in fact an
    upgrade.


    --
    Dilger: "Microsoft is first and foremost a marketing
    company that flogs third rate technology products."
     
    Carnations, Dec 3, 2008
    #8
  9. Lodi

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs "" typed:
    > PeeCee wrote:
    >
    >> Not necessarily true for late model chipsets.
    >> Bios's these days have IDE emulation for SATA drives, though I'm more
    >> familiar with desktop motherboards rather than Laptop.
    >> But a consideration all the same.
    >>
    >> The above 11 point 'method' should be enough for a competent
    >> technically oriented person to make the change.
    >> Hopefully it is also enough to make the less skilled realise they are
    >> out of their depth.

    >
    > The thing is, that it will be set to ahci by default and changing it
    > off this is just disabling the command queuing which can be very
    > beneficial when it starts to thrash the swap file IME.


    Like Paul, I'm more familiar with desktop motherboards but every one I've
    set up is set to IDE emulation by default, you have to change to AHCI
    manually.

    Also, with my last build, I didn't do the F6 floppy install as I didn't know
    I'd need it for NCQ. later, when I realised, I did a registry hack that got
    it working fine.

    BTW, real-world impact of NCQ is next-to-nothing.
    --
    Shaun.
     
    ~misfit~, Dec 3, 2008
    #9
  10. On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 17:27:26 +1300, Puddle <> wrote:

    >~misfit~ wrote:
    >> Somewhere on teh intarwebs "" typed:
    >>> PeeCee wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Not necessarily true for late model chipsets.
    >>>> Bios's these days have IDE emulation for SATA drives, though I'm more
    >>>> familiar with desktop motherboards rather than Laptop.
    >>>> But a consideration all the same.
    >>>>
    >>>> The above 11 point 'method' should be enough for a competent
    >>>> technically oriented person to make the change.
    >>>> Hopefully it is also enough to make the less skilled realise they are
    >>>> out of their depth.
    >>> The thing is, that it will be set to ahci by default and changing it
    >>> off this is just disabling the command queuing which can be very
    >>> beneficial when it starts to thrash the swap file IME.

    >>
    >> Like Paul, I'm more familiar with desktop motherboards but every one I've
    >> set up is set to IDE emulation by default, you have to change to AHCI
    >> manually.
    >>
    >> Also, with my last build, I didn't do the F6 floppy install as I didn't know
    >> I'd need it for NCQ. later, when I realised, I did a registry hack that got
    >> it working fine.
    >>
    >> BTW, real-world impact of NCQ is next-to-nothing.

    >
    >Just interested in that last statement of yours, have you read some
    >articles about this or just your own findings? I am not doubting it but
    >would love to read about it a bit. You think it is just a marketing
    >tool? Is it because the queue it uses is just too small? SCSI has a
    >similar thing doesn't it but a much larger queue if I remember correctly.


    With SCSI, you certainly see a difference. But it really only shows
    up when you have multiple applications frequently accessing different
    parts of the disk. I expect that it will be the same with SATA
    queuing. And most people do not have that sort of use of their disks,
    hence they do not see any difference. SCSI drives tend to be used in
    servers and with transaction processing into databases, and there you
    really see the difference.
     
    Stephen Worthington, Dec 4, 2008
    #10
  11. Lodi

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs "34.nz56.remove_numbers"
    typed:
    > On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 17:27:26 +1300, Puddle <> wrote:
    >
    >> ~misfit~ wrote:
    >>> Somewhere on teh intarwebs "" typed:
    >>>> PeeCee wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Not necessarily true for late model chipsets.
    >>>>> Bios's these days have IDE emulation for SATA drives, though I'm
    >>>>> more familiar with desktop motherboards rather than Laptop.
    >>>>> But a consideration all the same.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The above 11 point 'method' should be enough for a competent
    >>>>> technically oriented person to make the change.
    >>>>> Hopefully it is also enough to make the less skilled realise they
    >>>>> are out of their depth.
    >>>> The thing is, that it will be set to ahci by default and changing
    >>>> it off this is just disabling the command queuing which can be very
    >>>> beneficial when it starts to thrash the swap file IME.
    >>>
    >>> Like Paul, I'm more familiar with desktop motherboards but every
    >>> one I've set up is set to IDE emulation by default, you have to
    >>> change to AHCI manually.
    >>>
    >>> Also, with my last build, I didn't do the F6 floppy install as I
    >>> didn't know I'd need it for NCQ. later, when I realised, I did a
    >>> registry hack that got it working fine.
    >>>
    >>> BTW, real-world impact of NCQ is next-to-nothing.

    >>
    >> Just interested in that last statement of yours, have you read some
    >> articles about this or just your own findings?


    A bit of both Puddle. I read several reviews testing it a while back now and
    was pointed to more when I was seeking help with enabling it on my machine,
    being told not to bother.

    >> I am not doubting it
    >> but would love to read about it a bit. You think it is just a
    >> marketing tool? Is it because the queue it uses is just too small?
    >> SCSI has a similar thing doesn't it but a much larger queue if I
    >> remember correctly.

    >
    > With SCSI, you certainly see a difference. But it really only shows
    > up when you have multiple applications frequently accessing different
    > parts of the disk. I expect that it will be the same with SATA
    > queuing. And most people do not have that sort of use of their disks,
    > hence they do not see any difference. SCSI drives tend to be used in
    > servers and with transaction processing into databases, and there you
    > really see the difference.


    Yeah, that's pretty much the only time that NCQ makes a measurable
    difference according to reviews I've read. In server applications with lots
    of queued read requests.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.
     
    ~misfit~, Dec 4, 2008
    #11
  12. Lodi

    Will Spencer Guest

    On Wed, 3 Dec 2008 12:02:22 +0100 (CET), Carnations wrote:

    > On Wed, 03 Dec 2008 09:19:50 +1300, Enkidu wrote:
    >
    >> Technically it is a downgrade. A move to a newer version, no matter how
    >> bug-ridden is referred to as an upgrade, so a move to an older version
    >> is technically a downgrade. Even if the older version is better.

    >
    > A move to a better version is an upgrade. A move to an inferior version
    > is a downgrade.


    A move to XP is a move to an inferior version, therefore it is a downgrade.

    > While you're correct about the numerical nature of the progression, when
    > it comes to the actual quality of the version in question, if a previous
    > version is in fact has better features and higher quality of
    > implementation, then moving to a lower numerical version is in fact an
    > upgrade.


    That was my experience using Linux for a while. New versions of the Kernel
    were worse than the old. What a piece of shit it was. I'm glad in the end I
    upgraded from Linux to Windows 98 at the time.

    -ws
     
    Will Spencer, Dec 4, 2008
    #12
  13. In message <>, Carnations wrote:

    > On Tue, 02 Dec 2008 08:59:27 +0100, Lodi wrote:
    >
    >> Hi all... A friend of a friend was asking about how to downgrade an MSI
    >> laptop from Vista to XP.

    >
    > That is not a "downgrade" - that is actually an upgrade.


    Yeah ... an upgrade from something that needs a full flush to wash away, to
    something that only needs a half flush.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Dec 5, 2008
    #13
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. fernando

    downgrade pix 515

    fernando, Dec 11, 2003, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,676
    Walter Roberson
    Dec 11, 2003
  2. Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,434
    Mark Lar
    Mar 12, 2005
  3. Replies:
    2
    Views:
    5,105
  4. news.tpi.pl
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    461
    news.tpi.pl
    Oct 18, 2005
  5. James Martin

    Silly Question: Downgrade exams

    James Martin, Nov 18, 2003, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    386
    Herb Martin
    Nov 19, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page