Don't buy anything from RCA/Thomson, scumbag company

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Mike, Mar 24, 2006.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    This company apparently doesn't honor their warranties. Not only do they
    sell junk but when it breaks you are pretty much stuck with it. When this
    DVD recorder died, I took it to an authorized center and they told me RCA
    had to fax an authorization. When I contacted RCA they told me to go back to
    the repair center. So after 3 days and 6 hours of long distance calls and
    going in circles, I ended up nowhere. I guess RCA wants their customers to
    get frustrated and give up. I have pending claims with the Better Business
    Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission. RCA/Thomson has the worst inept
    tech support I ever encountered. If you call them you will be on hold for at
    least 45 minutes (long distance call to Oklahoma) and their voice mail
    directs you to the wrong department. Anybody can email me at
    if you want more details. Don't let yourself be a victim!
    We as consumers must put these scumbag companies out of business!
     
    Mike, Mar 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. Mike

    Alpha Guest

    "Mike" <> wrote in message
    news:SNZUf.1282$...
    > This company apparently doesn't honor their warranties. Not only do they
    > sell junk but when it breaks you are pretty much stuck with it. When this
    > DVD recorder died, I took it to an authorized center and they told me RCA
    > had to fax an authorization. When I contacted RCA they told me to go back
    > to
    > the repair center. So after 3 days and 6 hours of long distance calls and
    > going in circles, I ended up nowhere. I guess RCA wants their customers to
    > get frustrated and give up. I have pending claims with the Better Business
    > Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission. RCA/Thomson has the worst inept
    > tech support I ever encountered. If you call them you will be on hold for
    > at
    > least 45 minutes (long distance call to Oklahoma) and their voice mail
    > directs you to the wrong department. Anybody can email me at
    > if you want more details. Don't let yourself be a
    > victim!
    > We as consumers must put these scumbag companies out of business!
    >
    >


    I bought an RCA portable DVD player that broke within warranty. I sent it
    in. They sent me a BROKEN one back. It took me over a year to get my money
    back after filing complaints with various consumer agencies.
     
    Alpha, Mar 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. Mike

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    On Fri, 24 Mar 2006 13:47:29 -0800, "Mike" <> Gave us:

    >This company apparently doesn't honor their warranties. Not only do they
    >sell junk but when it breaks you are pretty much stuck with it. When this
    >DVD recorder died, I took it to an authorized center and they told me RCA
    >had to fax an authorization. When I contacted RCA they told me to go back to
    >the repair center. So after 3 days and 6 hours of long distance calls and
    >going in circles, I ended up nowhere. I guess RCA wants their customers to
    >get frustrated and give up. I have pending claims with the Better Business
    >Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission. RCA/Thomson has the worst inept
    >tech support I ever encountered. If you call them you will be on hold for at
    >least 45 minutes (long distance call to Oklahoma) and their voice mail
    >directs you to the wrong department. Anybody can email me at
    > if you want more details. Don't let yourself be a victim!
    >We as consumers must put these scumbag companies out of business!
    >

    Maybe you should learn a little diplomacy. It doesn't include overt
    pissing and moaning. If you had done it correctly, I am sure that you
    would have been helped.

    How old is the unit?
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Mar 25, 2006
    #3
  4. Mike

    Mike Guest

    > Maybe you should learn a little diplomacy. It doesn't include overt
    > pissing and moaning. If you had done it correctly, I am sure that you
    > would have been helped.
    >
    > How old is the unit?


    well if you bothered to read my post I did everything they told me to do. I
    guess the only thing left was to show up at their office and beg for them to
    honor this warranty. Its only 6 months old. I guess I need to brush up on my
    diplomacy skills while being on hold for an hour. I gave it a valiant
    effort, 3 days in a row
     
    Mike, Mar 25, 2006
    #4
  5. Mike

    Rich Guest

    On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 00:14:27 GMT, Roy L. Fuchs
    <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 24 Mar 2006 13:47:29 -0800, "Mike" <> Gave us:
    >
    >>This company apparently doesn't honor their warranties. Not only do they
    >>sell junk but when it breaks you are pretty much stuck with it. When this
    >>DVD recorder died, I took it to an authorized center and they told me RCA
    >>had to fax an authorization. When I contacted RCA they told me to go back to
    >>the repair center. So after 3 days and 6 hours of long distance calls and
    >>going in circles, I ended up nowhere. I guess RCA wants their customers to
    >>get frustrated and give up. I have pending claims with the Better Business
    >>Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission. RCA/Thomson has the worst inept
    >>tech support I ever encountered. If you call them you will be on hold for at
    >>least 45 minutes (long distance call to Oklahoma) and their voice mail
    >>directs you to the wrong department. Anybody can email me at
    >> if you want more details. Don't let yourself be a victim!
    >>We as consumers must put these scumbag companies out of business!
    >>

    > Maybe you should learn a little diplomacy. It doesn't include overt
    >pissing and moaning. If you had done it correctly, I am sure that you
    >would have been helped.
    >
    > How old is the unit?


    Why the F--- in this day and age should someone have to
    spend ANY time on long distance calls for this?
    They should allow you to contract them via email, provide a component
    serial number and THEY should provide the avenue to have it fixed.
    -Rich
     
    Rich, Mar 25, 2006
    #5
  6. Mike

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 15:42:52 -0500, Rich <> Gave us:

    >On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 00:14:27 GMT, Roy L. Fuchs
    ><> wrote:
    >


    >Why the F--- in this day and age should someone have to
    >spend ANY time on long distance calls for this?
    >They should allow you to contract them via email, provide a component
    >serial number and THEY should provide the avenue to have it fixed.
    >-Rich


    With this, I am in much agreement. The same thing should happen when
    you BUY it. It should NOT require registration at all, and if bought
    from a legit store, the STORE should forward the sales info to the
    maker, and when you go to make a claim, any legally purchased product
    should have full traceability already attached to its serial number.
    This would automatically track illegal channels, as well as stolen
    articles.

    If they can track cell phone activity to the degree they do, this
    orders of magnitude less info should be easy to maintain.

    OR someone should start a national product registry web site where
    when a problem occurs, the registry forwards the info to the
    appropriate maker, and they HAVE to honor their obligations of
    warranty. Just like they track us for credit standing! This would put
    the BBB out of business (they should be the ones that do it).
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Mar 25, 2006
    #6
  7. Mike

    Mike Guest

    > I bought an RCA portable DVD player that broke within warranty. I sent it
    > in. They sent me a BROKEN one back. It took me over a year to get my

    money
    > back after filing complaints with various consumer agencies.
    >


    Can you tell me the agencies you filed complaints with? I want to make sure
    I have them all covered. If you read the reviews at Amazon, you can see I am
    not the only one. There should be a class action lawsuit started.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...7806-4462568?_encoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=172282
     
    Mike, Mar 26, 2006
    #7
  8. Mike

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    On Sun, 26 Mar 2006 09:20:07 -0800, "Mike" <> Gave us:

    > If you read the reviews at Amazon, you can see I am
    >not the only one. There should be a class action lawsuit started.



    Which would make some lawyers rich, but still would not solve your
    problem any time soon, nor net your any remuneration.
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Mar 26, 2006
    #8
  9. Mike

    GuessWho Guest

    Part of the problem may be due to the fact that the RCA and Thomson brands
    no longer belong to the Thomson group of France. Thomson has just about
    gotten out of the consumer electronics business and many of the products
    using the RCA/Thomson logo are coming from an Indian company ( Videocon ) or
    a Chinese company ( TCL ). For awhile now I've been seeing Westinghouse and
    Sylvania products which are also now products from Chinese companies using
    the purchased naming rites of these old US brands.

    Wayne

    "Roy L. Fuchs" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 15:42:52 -0500, Rich <> Gave us:
    >
    >>On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 00:14:27 GMT, Roy L. Fuchs
    >><> wrote:
    >>

    >
    >>Why the F--- in this day and age should someone have to
    >>spend ANY time on long distance calls for this?
    >>They should allow you to contract them via email, provide a component
    >>serial number and THEY should provide the avenue to have it fixed.
    >>-Rich

    >
    > With this, I am in much agreement. The same thing should happen when
    > you BUY it. It should NOT require registration at all, and if bought
    > from a legit store, the STORE should forward the sales info to the
    > maker, and when you go to make a claim, any legally purchased product
    > should have full traceability already attached to its serial number.
    > This would automatically track illegal channels, as well as stolen
    > articles.
    >
    > If they can track cell phone activity to the degree they do, this
    > orders of magnitude less info should be easy to maintain.
    >
    > OR someone should start a national product registry web site where
    > when a problem occurs, the registry forwards the info to the
    > appropriate maker, and they HAVE to honor their obligations of
    > warranty. Just like they track us for credit standing! This would put
    > the BBB out of business (they should be the ones that do it).
     
    GuessWho, Mar 26, 2006
    #9
  10. Mike

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    Roy L. Fuchs, Mar 26, 2006
    #10
  11. Mike

    Tony Guest


    > With this, I am in much agreement. The same thing should happen when
    >you BUY it. It should NOT require registration at all, and if bought
    >from a legit store, the STORE should forward the sales info to the
    >maker, and when you go to make a claim, any legally purchased product
    >should have full traceability already attached to its serial number.
    >This would automatically track illegal channels, as well as stolen
    >articles.


    That wouldnt work. The store is not responsible for registering the product for you. They arent paid
    to do that. Plus, how can they register it for the buyer when, in probably 50% of the sales, the
    product can be a gift for someone else. What about if the product is returned? If it was already
    registered with the company, it would be pretty messy if it were returned (for any reason) and then
    someone else bought it.

    If the customer is so ignorant that they cannot fill out the warranty card, or register online, then
    they are at the mercy of having to find out how to get it fixed under warranty.

    Tony
     
    Tony, Mar 28, 2006
    #11
  12. Mike

    Trevor Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 00:16:08 -0500, Tony <>
    wrote:

    >> With this, I am in much agreement. The same thing should happen when
    >>you BUY it. It should NOT require registration at all, and if bought
    >>from a legit store, the STORE should forward the sales info to the
    >>maker, and when you go to make a claim, any legally purchased product
    >>should have full traceability already attached to its serial number.
    >>This would automatically track illegal channels, as well as stolen
    >>articles.

    >
    >That wouldnt work.


    Sounds like you don't have much imagination. Such a system could be
    made to work just fine.

    >The store is not responsible for registering the product for you.
    >They arent paid to do that.


    Currently, they aren't, but again your lack of imagination is blinding
    you.

    >Plus, how can they register it for the buyer when, in probably 50% of
    >the sales, the product can be a gift for someone else.


    First of all, where are you getting your 50% figure? Secondly, why
    does it matter? When an item is purchased, it's already scanned at the
    checkout register, prices are electronically validated, inventories
    are adjusted, in some cases re-orders are automatically generated,
    etc. It would be trivial to scan a second bar code containing the
    serial number of the item, and have that information sent to a
    clearinghouse where it is distributed to the various manufacturers.

    >What about if the product is returned? If it was already registered
    >with the company, it would be pretty messy if it were returned (for
    >any reason) and then someone else bought it.


    Returns are also <already> scanned, so no big deal there. Just as the
    original sale information was sent to the clearinghouse, the Return
    information could also be sent. If the item is later resold, guess
    what? Send that updated information to the clearinghouse. I don't see
    anything messy about it, unless you mean the human factor from people
    who get nervous when something changes in their lives.
     
    Trevor, Mar 28, 2006
    #12
  13. Mike

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 00:16:08 -0500, Tony <> Gave
    us:

    >That wouldnt work. The store is not responsible for registering the product for you. They arent paid
    >to do that.


    Stores have rebates all the time, Mfgrs already track the sale back
    to the store to legitimize the rebate. It would NOT be any problem or
    stretch of resources already in use to send Mfgrs purchase info for
    the purpose of product warranty registration, you pathetic, cringing
    little milksop.
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Mar 28, 2006
    #13
  14. Mike

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 00:16:08 -0500, Tony <> Gave
    us:

    > Plus, how can they register it for the buyer when, in probably 50% of the sales, the
    >product can be a gift for someone else.


    The SALE date is tracked, and the sale legitimacy. After that ANY
    owner has the warranty period assigned to that product. That time
    frame is honored regardless of who the submitter for RMA is.

    It really is quite simple, dufus. The product is warranted from the
    date of sale, not the time of warranty registration already. It
    shouldn't matter who submits a failed product for service, as long as
    it is inside the warranty period.
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Mar 28, 2006
    #14
  15. Mike

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 00:16:08 -0500, Tony <> Gave
    us:

    > What about if the product is returned? If it was already
    >registered with the company, it would be pretty messy if it were returned (for any reason) and then
    >someone else bought it.


    The store would ALSO track returns and report back to the Mfgr
    whether it was a failed product return, or a return due to the product
    not meeting the application, etc. There are already HUGE channels of
    "factory refurbed" devices out there that were once "used", and that
    for who knows how long?

    This would actually be a better system.
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Mar 28, 2006
    #15
  16. Mike

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 00:16:08 -0500, Tony <> Gave
    us:

    >If the customer is so ignorant that they cannot fill out the warranty card, or register online, then
    >they are at the mercy of having to find out how to get it fixed under warranty.


    The product is warranted by law, even without the registration card.
    It is just a bigger pain in the ass to effect a service. The sales
    receipt is actually the only requisite the law requires. Most
    companies honor that fact.
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Mar 28, 2006
    #16
  17. Mike

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 05:46:22 GMT, Trevor <beanerana@.invalid.net> Gave
    us:

    >On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 00:16:08 -0500, Tony <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>> With this, I am in much agreement. The same thing should happen when
    >>>you BUY it. It should NOT require registration at all, and if bought
    >>>from a legit store, the STORE should forward the sales info to the
    >>>maker, and when you go to make a claim, any legally purchased product
    >>>should have full traceability already attached to its serial number.
    >>>This would automatically track illegal channels, as well as stolen
    >>>articles.

    >>
    >>That wouldnt work.

    >
    >Sounds like you don't have much imagination. Such a system could be
    >made to work just fine.
    >
    >>The store is not responsible for registering the product for you.
    >>They arent paid to do that.

    >
    >Currently, they aren't, but again your lack of imagination is blinding
    >you.
    >
    >>Plus, how can they register it for the buyer when, in probably 50% of
    >>the sales, the product can be a gift for someone else.

    >
    >First of all, where are you getting your 50% figure? Secondly, why
    >does it matter? When an item is purchased, it's already scanned at the
    >checkout register, prices are electronically validated, inventories
    >are adjusted, in some cases re-orders are automatically generated,
    >etc. It would be trivial to scan a second bar code containing the
    >serial number of the item, and have that information sent to a
    >clearinghouse where it is distributed to the various manufacturers.
    >
    >>What about if the product is returned? If it was already registered
    >>with the company, it would be pretty messy if it were returned (for
    >>any reason) and then someone else bought it.

    >
    >Returns are also <already> scanned, so no big deal there. Just as the
    >original sale information was sent to the clearinghouse, the Return
    >information could also be sent. If the item is later resold, guess
    >what? Send that updated information to the clearinghouse. I don't see
    >anything messy about it, unless you mean the human factor from people
    >who get nervous when something changes in their lives.


    Thank you. I think such a system would actually save Mfgrs money,
    and consumers time and headaches.
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Mar 28, 2006
    #17
  18. Mike

    Tony Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 11:13:18 GMT, Roy L. Fuchs <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 00:16:08 -0500, Tony <> Gave
    >us:
    >
    >> Plus, how can they register it for the buyer when, in probably 50% of the sales, the
    >>product can be a gift for someone else.

    >
    > The SALE date is tracked, and the sale legitimacy. After that ANY
    >owner has the warranty period assigned to that product. That time
    >frame is honored regardless of who the submitter for RMA is.
    >
    > It really is quite simple, dufus. The product is warranted from the
    >date of sale, not the time of warranty registration already. It
    >shouldn't matter who submits a failed product for service, as long as
    >it is inside the warranty period.


    You are the dufus who has no idea how it works. If you bought something and it was registered to
    you, and then you returned it, the warranty does not transfer to the new owner. It doesnt work that
    way. If you were the one that bought the product after it was returned, then when something goes
    wrong with it, you are not covered because warranties are generally not transferable. I have my own
    computer business and work out of an authorized repair center and what you are proposing is insane
    and will never happen. The fact that you want it does not mean it can ever happen. And I will be
    proven right because there will be waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay tooo much paperwork. Do you know how many
    people come in for repairs that received items for xmas or birthday gifts? Guess what ??? No one
    gets any item fixed without their ORIGINAL RECEIPT. THats how the manufacturers do it. So, everyone
    that got a gift are not getting their product fixed under your chaotic scenario. You have no idea
    how warranties work.

    Again, it will never happen, nor do I think it should. Do you realize that some people pay cash and
    will never give their name and address to any clerk at a store. WHat happens in that case? What
    happens to the small mom and pop stores that do not have the ability to register a product for you?
    Do you know how many small stores still do not even use computers? WHat about the shady electronics
    stores in the Broadway Theater district in Manhatten? Do you think for one second they are going to
    be responsible enough to go with you idiotic plan? They cant even speak English. They take cash
    without charging tax. They sell gray market goods. They are not going to do anything more than they
    do now.

    Aint gonna happen. Just buy something, keep the receipt and have it ready when you need a warranty
    repair. It has worked that way forever and it cannot, and will not change.

    Tony
     
    Tony, Mar 29, 2006
    #18
  19. On 3/28/2006, Tony posted this:
    > On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 11:13:18 GMT, Roy L. Fuchs
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 00:16:08 -0500, Tony <> Gave
    >> us:
    >>
    >>> Plus, how can they register it for the buyer when, in probably 50% of the
    >>> sales, the product can be a gift for someone else.

    >>
    >> The SALE date is tracked, and the sale legitimacy. After that ANY
    >> owner has the warranty period assigned to that product. That time
    >> frame is honored regardless of who the submitter for RMA is.
    >>
    >> It really is quite simple, dufus. The product is warranted from the
    >> date of sale, not the time of warranty registration already. It
    >> shouldn't matter who submits a failed product for service, as long as
    >> it is inside the warranty period.

    >
    > You are the dufus who has no idea how it works. If you bought something and
    > it was registered to you, and then you returned it, the warranty does not
    > transfer to the new owner. It doesnt work that way. If you were the one that
    > bought the product after it was returned, then when something goes wrong with
    > it, you are not covered because warranties are generally not transferable. I
    > have my own computer business and work out of an authorized repair center and
    > what you are proposing is insane and will never happen. The fact that you
    > want it does not mean it can ever happen. And I will be proven right because
    > there will be waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay tooo much paperwork. Do you know how many
    > people come in for repairs that received items for xmas or birthday gifts?
    > Guess what ??? No one gets any item fixed without their ORIGINAL RECEIPT.
    > THats how the manufacturers do it. So, everyone that got a gift are not
    > getting their product fixed under your chaotic scenario. You have no idea how
    > warranties work.


    Some stores - Target, Nordstrom's, and others less famous - I *know* to
    give a gift receipt with every purchase.

    This receipt has the store name and enough information on it to
    identify the transaction if there is a return or warranty issue,
    without revealing the price of the item.

    The giver keeps the normal receipt and gives the other to the
    recipient.

    This is not a particularly new thing.

    There is nothing more fun than getting home with your purchase of
    deodorant and mouthwash and discovering that you have a gift receipt
    :)

    HTH,
    Gino

    <SNIP>

    > Tony


    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Gino)
    letters617blochg3251
    (replace the numbers by "at" and "dotcom")
     
    Gene E. Bloch, Mar 29, 2006
    #19
  20. Mike

    Allen Guest

    Tony wrote:
    > On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 11:13:18 GMT, Roy L. Fuchs <> wrote:
    >
    >

    Tony--don't be surprised by this guy's responses. I killfiled him the
    second day after I subscribed to this NG. Don't waste your time with
    him, just block him.
    Allen
     
    Allen, Mar 29, 2006
    #20
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