does HD-DVD use red-laser or blue-laser ?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by videogamedude@gmail.com, Apr 15, 2005.

  1. Alan Figgatt wrote:

    > A large part of the reason that Sony is not using DVD in their
    > product name is that if they used DVD, they would have to pay
    > royalties to the companies that own parts of the DVD copyrights.


    Well, no. The term "DVD" isn't copyrighted at all. There are a few standards
    (DVD-Video, DVD-RAM, DVD-R(W) etc) that are property of the DVD Forum, so
    Sony can't use any of the names for these formats. But they can use a term
    that includes "DVD" if they want...

    The reason Sony isn't using anything with DVD is that it would imply that
    their new devices are compatible to generic DVDs (playback DVD-Videos for
    example) which they aren't.

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Apr 17, 2005
    #21
    1. Advertising

  2. Bill Vermillion wrote:

    > As I recall the licensing on VHS was lower.


    Right.

    > Sony invented VHS


    Wrong. VHS was invented by the Victor Company of Japan (aka JVC)...

    > but
    > didn't like it and moved on to Beta. Sony did NOT keep Beta to
    > itself. Other manufacturers made Beta machines and I had
    > an NEC that was had gorgeous pictures


    Right. Sony licensed Beta to other companies. But they had to call their
    recorders "Beta" while Sony used the copyrighted term "Betamax"...

    > - as it also had
    > the SB1 - Super Beta 1 - that Sony had in their high-end machines
    > like my SL-1000 and perhaps the 900 series also.


    Right, but at that time there also were SVHS machines which used separate
    Y/C recording and offered a much better picture than the SuperBeta which
    still used composite recording...

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Apr 17, 2005
    #22
    1. Advertising

  3. Bill Vermillion wrote:

    > As I recall it, Sony invented it, and discarded the concept,


    That's just an urban legend. Widespread, but still a legend.

    > and
    > then JVC went on to develop it with the current specs in use today.


    No. It also wouldn't be possible. Remember that Sony charged a lot for
    licensing Betamax and even Umatic to other companies? You really believe the
    exact same company would invest money in developing a video standard and
    then giving it away for free?

    > The VHS was somewhat patterned after the U-matic that Sony
    > announced in 1969 and introducedin 1972, but with 1/2"
    > tape instead of 3/4" tape. As I recall the time line was Sony
    > developed/invented VHS in 1974/5, never even marketed it, and
    > went on to releast the Beta in 1975.


    Sonys Betamax system derived from their semiprofessional Umatic video
    system. Both share a lot of common parameters, like the U-Loading concept.

    VHS, which definitely was invented by JVC and not by Sony, had some
    different approaches (i.e. M-Loading concept)...

    Sony never did anything like VHS. They went directly from Umatic to their
    home video system Betamax...

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Apr 17, 2005
    #23
  4. Joshua Zyber Guest

    "Benjamin Gawert" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The reason Sony isn't using anything with DVD is that it would imply
    > that their new devices are compatible to generic DVDs (playback
    > DVD-Videos for example) which they aren't.


    Both Blu-Ray and HD-DVD will be backwards compatible with standard DVD.
    This has been confirmed by both camps.
     
    Joshua Zyber, Apr 17, 2005
    #24
  5. Jeff Rife Guest

    Joshua Zyber () wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
    > > The reason Sony isn't using anything with DVD is that it would imply
    > > that their new devices are compatible to generic DVDs (playback
    > > DVD-Videos for example) which they aren't.

    >
    > Both Blu-Ray and HD-DVD will be backwards compatible with standard DVD.
    > This has been confirmed by both camps.


    I remember that one of the two technologies could be set up with multiple
    layers so that you could put standard DVD-Video on the same disc as the
    HD video, and current players would only see the DVD-Video. That would
    be the best thing for full compatability, but I don't see it happening,
    as the only reason to do it would be to have new releases using the dual
    format. This would mean no double sales, since people would already have
    the HD version when they get an HD player.

    --
    Jeff Rife |
    | http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/Dilbert/TechBigot.gif
     
    Jeff Rife, Apr 17, 2005
    #25
  6. In article <>,
    Benjamin Gawert <> wrote:
    >Bill Vermillion wrote:
    >
    >> As I recall the licensing on VHS was lower.

    >
    >Right.
    >
    >> Sony invented VHS

    >
    >Wrong. VHS was invented by the Victor Company of Japan (aka JVC)...
    >
    >> but
    >> didn't like it and moved on to Beta. Sony did NOT keep Beta to
    >> itself. Other manufacturers made Beta machines and I had
    >> an NEC that was had gorgeous pictures

    >
    >Right. Sony licensed Beta to other companies. But they had to call their
    >recorders "Beta" while Sony used the copyrighted term "Betamax"...


    >> - as it also had
    >> the SB1 - Super Beta 1 - that Sony had in their high-end machines
    >> like my SL-1000 and perhaps the 900 series also.


    >Right, but at that time there also were SVHS machines which used
    >separate Y/C recording and offered a much better picture than the
    >SuperBeta which still used composite recording...


    But the S-VHS didn't compare with SB-1. My SL-1000s had a 6Mhz
    bandwidth and the difference was visible. Those also had lower
    chroma noise than S-VHS. Then my EDV-9500 ran with a 10MHz
    bandwidth and using the standard test patterns, the resolution
    came in between 500 and 550. You could see 500, but not 550, so I
    estimated it was about 525.

    Bill
    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
     
    Bill Vermillion, Apr 17, 2005
    #26
  7. In article <>,
    "Benjamin Gawert" <> wrote:

    >The term "DVD" isn't copyrighted at all.


    But it is trademarkable, provided it doesn't actually stand for anything.
     
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Apr 19, 2005
    #27
  8. chrisv Guest

    Benjamin Gawert wrote:

    >VHS, which definitely was invented by JVC and not by Sony, had some
    >different approaches (i.e. M-Loading concept)...


    I'm on your side. I know I've read some articles on this, including
    one just a few years ago, about the guy at JVC who they call "the
    father of VHS". If there was a Sony origin of the technology that was
    not mentioned, it would have to be one of the most dishonest pieces of
    reporting that I've ever read.
     
    chrisv, Apr 19, 2005
    #28
  9. "Black Locust" <> kirjoitti
    viestissä:...
    > so we have CD, DVD, VHS and... Blu-Ray?! How is the average Joe
    > even supposed to know what that is? HD-DVD works fine and is about as


    The answer is All-in-one Combo Drive, of course! Just read the petition
    http://www.petitiononline.com/combo/petition.html, undersign it, and spread
    the word about it. It is that simple.

    I am not going to worry about the formats; I will buy a combo drive that can
    handle them all.

    --
    Henri Heinonen - filosofian ylioppilas fysiikasta
     
    Henri Tapani Heinonen, Apr 20, 2005
    #29
  10. "Bill Vermillion" <> kirjoitti viestissä:...
    > As the old saying goes "the nice thing about standards is we have
    > so many from which to choose".


    Yes. That is true.

    The only way to preserve all the formats is to make a combo drive which can
    read and write them all. See
    http://www.petitiononline.com/combo/petition.html.

    --
    Henri Heinonen - filosofian ylioppilas fysiikasta
     
    Henri Tapani Heinonen, Apr 20, 2005
    #30
  11. Alpha Guest

    "Henri Tapani Heinonen" <> wrote in message
    news:d45jvp$6fc$...
    > "Black Locust" <> kirjoitti
    > viestissä:...
    >> so we have CD, DVD, VHS and... Blu-Ray?! How is the average Joe
    >> even supposed to know what that is? HD-DVD works fine and is about as

    >
    > The answer is All-in-one Combo Drive, of course! Just read the petition
    > http://www.petitiononline.com/combo/petition.html, undersign it, and
    > spread the word about it. It is that simple.
    >
    > I am not going to worry about the formats; I will buy a combo drive that
    > can handle them all.
    >
    > --
    > Henri Heinonen - filosofian ylioppilas fysiikasta
    >


    Dream on. The industry is headed in the right direction. The problem is
    not solved with a combo drive. The issue is the format for the entire
    commercial film and video industry in the next generation of formats.
     
    Alpha, Apr 25, 2005
    #31
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Alex B

    Datawrite Red (V3) Red - DVD-R's

    Alex B, Jul 16, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    621
  2. sonof3m
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    547
    sonof3m
    Dec 17, 2004
  3. Allan
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    528
    Allan
    Mar 9, 2005
  4. DVD Verdict
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,053
    DVD Verdict
    Mar 18, 2005
  5. Allan
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    647
    Allan
    Nov 26, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page