Does anybody have Recommendations for a laptop?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Mark C, Aug 10, 2005.

  1. Mark C

    Mark C Guest

    OK, I *am* about to also pricespy and google away to find a good
    laptop, but if anybody has any recommendations, that would be
    marvelous!

    It needs to handle:

    Web browsing (dialup)
    VoIP
    Word processing

    Video games not required.

    I figure even the most basic laptop will do this, so something about
    40GB drive, 256MB RAM would be OK.

    Should I upgrade to 512MB?
    (In my experience, extra memory is the one thing that future proofs a
    PC.)

    In general, which brands are good, which are bad?

    Can good second-hand laptops be had?

    Thanks,
    Mark
     
    Mark C, Aug 10, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 10 Aug 2005 09:43:03 GMT, Mark C <> wrote:

    >Web browsing (dialup)
    >VoIP
    >Word processing
    >
    >Video games not required.

    they get an ex-leae dell or tosh laptop from computerlink.co.nz or
    valley brokers in upper hutt...
     
    John in Epsom, Aug 10, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Mark C

    Nova Guest

    Mark C wrote:
    > OK, I *am* about to also pricespy and google away to find a good
    > laptop, but if anybody has any recommendations, that would be
    > marvelous!
    >
    > It needs to handle:
    >
    > Web browsing (dialup)
    > VoIP
    > Word processing
    >
    > Video games not required.
    >
    > I figure even the most basic laptop will do this, so something about
    > 40GB drive, 256MB RAM would be OK.
    >
    > Should I upgrade to 512MB?
    > (In my experience, extra memory is the one thing that future proofs a
    > PC.)
    >
    > In general, which brands are good, which are bad?
    >
    > Can good second-hand laptops be had?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    I got a Asus M6000R, which I like a lot, widescreen 15"4 screen which is
    nice and all the standard bells and whistles these days, wireless, dvd
    writer, 512 megs etc etc. It was about $1600

    Asus are well known for the quality of their motherboards and seem to be
    trying to break into the laptop market (as are loads of companies now)
    and prices are really starting to drop...

    I'd decide how much you want to spend, and is screen resolution +screen
    size important to you?

    Also an important thing, are you actually going to use it as a laptop?
    or will it mostly be run on AC power? as if you are going to use it on
    AC power then you can buy a much cheaper and far more power laptop with
    a standard cpu instead of a cpu made for laptops.

    If youa re going to take it on the road a lot then obviously you want to
    get a cpu made for laptops.

    You can get ASUS laptops with sempron 3000's for like $1500 so with all
    bells and whistles new.

    Product Details (A4500D):
    15” LCD Screen
    Sempron 3000+ Processor
    Graphics: ATI Mobility™ Radeon™ 9200 (32mb)
    512 MB Memory
    40GB Hard Disk Drive
    DVD Writer (8x dual layer,dual format)
    » Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
    » Wireless Network 802.11g
    » Memory Card Reader
    » 8-cell Battery
    » Mouse and Carry Bag
    Asus 2 year global warranty.

    I've also had a Dell laptop which was good, but have had no problems
    with either.

    I'd definitely get 512 megs, assuming you are going to put windows on it
    which of course will come with it :)
     
    Nova, Aug 10, 2005
    #3
  4. Mark C

    Dave Taylor Guest

    Mark C <> wrote in news:42f9cc27$0$1601$c3e8da3
    @news.astraweb.com:

    > OK, I *am* about to also pricespy and google away to find a good
    > laptop, but if anybody has any recommendations, that would be
    > marvelous!
    >


    Bad idea, do that after you pick your model. The screen and keyboard, look
    and feel are CRITICAL and SUBJECTIVE. If you don't like it, you will not
    be happy. Specs are important, but so is actually touching a few.
    Anything low end new will do what you want it to do. Heck even a low end
    used will do what you want.

    --
    Ciao, Dave
     
    Dave Taylor, Aug 10, 2005
    #4
  5. > OK, I *am* about to also pricespy and google away to find a good
    > laptop, but if anybody has any recommendations, that would be
    > marvelous!
    >
    > It needs to handle:
    >
    > Web browsing (dialup)
    > VoIP
    > Word processing
    >



    The cheapest possible dell or acer or compaq or whatever, and upgrade it to
    512mb.

    The cheap acers are damn cheap, however i think they only have a 2 hour
    battery life.

    Cheers,
    Steve
     
    Stephen Williams, Aug 10, 2005
    #5
  6. Mark C wrote:
    > OK, I *am* about to also pricespy and google away to find a good
    > laptop, but if anybody has any recommendations, that would be
    > marvelous!
    >
    > It needs to handle:
    >
    > Web browsing (dialup)
    > VoIP
    > Word processing
    >
    > Video games not required.
    >
    > I figure even the most basic laptop will do this, so something about
    > 40GB drive, 256MB RAM would be OK.
    >
    > Should I upgrade to 512MB?
    > (In my experience, extra memory is the one thing that future proofs a
    > PC.)
    >
    > In general, which brands are good, which are bad?


    I'm told pretty much anything from HP/Compaq should be reliable.
    Toshiba, and Fujitsu are other brands I'd recommend. I'd avoid Acer,
    Asus, and Sony, even though they are well known brands.

    I quite like the HP V2134AP which can be had for around $1,500+GST at
    the moment. This has a 14" widescreen so it isn't as large as some of
    the (slightly) cheaper 15" models around. Pentium M, 60GB hard drive,
    512MB RAM, 10/100 Ethernet, modem, 802.11b/g, and Bluetooth.

    The Other Guy
     
    The Other Guy, Aug 10, 2005
    #6
  7. Mark C

    MarkH Guest

    Mark C <> wrote in news:42f9cc27$0$1601$c3e8da3
    @news.astraweb.com:

    > OK, I *am* about to also pricespy and google away to find a good
    > laptop, but if anybody has any recommendations, that would be
    > marvelous!
    >
    > It needs to handle:
    >
    > Web browsing (dialup)
    > VoIP
    > Word processing
    >
    > Video games not required.
    >
    > I figure even the most basic laptop will do this, so something about
    > 40GB drive, 256MB RAM would be OK.
    >
    > Should I upgrade to 512MB?
    > (In my experience, extra memory is the one thing that future proofs a
    > PC.)


    I recently noticed this:
    http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?item=NBKHNB1085
    An HP laptop for $999+GST

    This seems to be a good price, I have used HP Laptops and quite like them.

    I would recommend upgrading to 512MB, in my experience WinXP runs better
    with 512MB than 256MB.



    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 25-June-05)
    "There are 10 types of people, those that
    understand binary and those that don't"
     
    MarkH, Aug 10, 2005
    #7
  8. Mark C

    Nova Guest

    The Other Guy wrote:
    >
    > Mark C wrote:
    >
    >> OK, I *am* about to also pricespy and google away to find a good
    >> laptop, but if anybody has any recommendations, that would be marvelous!
    >>
    >> It needs to handle:
    >>
    >> Web browsing (dialup)
    >> VoIP
    >> Word processing
    >>
    >> Video games not required.
    >>
    >> I figure even the most basic laptop will do this, so something about
    >> 40GB drive, 256MB RAM would be OK.
    >>
    >> Should I upgrade to 512MB?
    >> (In my experience, extra memory is the one thing that future proofs a
    >> PC.)
    >>
    >> In general, which brands are good, which are bad?

    >
    >
    > I'm told pretty much anything from HP/Compaq should be reliable.
    > Toshiba, and Fujitsu are other brands I'd recommend. I'd avoid Acer,
    > Asus, and Sony, even though they are well known brands.
    >
    > I quite like the HP V2134AP which can be had for around $1,500+GST at
    > the moment. This has a 14" widescreen so it isn't as large as some of
    > the (slightly) cheaper 15" models around. Pentium M, 60GB hard drive,
    > 512MB RAM, 10/100 Ethernet, modem, 802.11b/g, and Bluetooth.
    >
    > The Other Guy


    I'm curious why you would recommend avoiding Asus, any reasoning there?

    I had 2 problems with the only compaq Ive owned, screen had a line down
    it and the speakers crackkled continuously.

    of course that doesn't mean compaq are bad but I'd certainly never
    recommend them out of my personal experience.

    On the other hand my asus has given no problems and was cheaper than
    just buying from a traditional name brand in the laptop market.

    Asus aren't exactly some cheap outfit, their motherboards are usually
    the most expensive on the market cause they go for quality.
    Their laptops are cheaper because
    1) they are trying to break into the market
    2) the tradional laptop manufacturers have probably been gouging the market

    anyway im always curious when someoen says avoid such and such and
    doesn't give a reason at all or is this a "ive heard.." based opinion ? :)
     
    Nova, Aug 10, 2005
    #8
  9. Nova wrote:
    > I'm curious why you would recommend avoiding Asus, any reasoning there?
    >
    > On the other hand my asus has given no problems and was cheaper than
    > just buying from a traditional name brand in the laptop market.


    Asus offers good pricing, but in their lower end models they aren't
    competative on size and weight. That isn't a reason not to buy them, but
    it was certainly the major factor in ruling them out for my pending
    purchases.

    > Asus aren't exactly some cheap outfit, their motherboards are usually
    > the most expensive on the market cause they go for quality.
    > Their laptops are cheaper because
    > 1) they are trying to break into the market
    > 2) the tradional laptop manufacturers have probably been gouging the market
    >
    > anyway im always curious when someoen says avoid such and such and
    > doesn't give a reason at all or is this a "ive heard.." based opinion ? :)


    I don't work in PC assembly, but failure rates of new motherboards
    appear to be quite high, and Asus is no exception. Recently I was
    discussing this issue with a PC manufacturer (Since I had to get my
    Gigabyte motherboard replaced), and they had seen several examples of
    higher priced Asus boards not working out of the box.

    I avoid Asus because we used to use them in my old job. The boss was
    cheap, so we ended up with boards that had crap chipsets. Asus obviosuly
    should know about the problems, but sells the items anyway.

    The Other Guy
     
    The Other Guy, Aug 10, 2005
    #9
  10. Mark C

    Nova Guest

    The Other Guy wrote:
    > Nova wrote:
    >
    >> I'm curious why you would recommend avoiding Asus, any reasoning there?
    >>
    >> On the other hand my asus has given no problems and was cheaper than
    >> just buying from a traditional name brand in the laptop market.

    >
    >
    > Asus offers good pricing, but in their lower end models they aren't
    > competative on size and weight. That isn't a reason not to buy them, but
    > it was certainly the major factor in ruling them out for my pending
    > purchases.
    >
    >> Asus aren't exactly some cheap outfit, their motherboards are usually
    >> the most expensive on the market cause they go for quality.
    >> Their laptops are cheaper because
    >> 1) they are trying to break into the market
    >> 2) the tradional laptop manufacturers have probably been gouging the
    >> market
    >>
    >> anyway im always curious when someoen says avoid such and such and
    >> doesn't give a reason at all or is this a "ive heard.." based opinion
    >> ? :)

    >
    >
    > I don't work in PC assembly, but failure rates of new motherboards
    > appear to be quite high, and Asus is no exception. Recently I was
    > discussing this issue with a PC manufacturer (Since I had to get my
    > Gigabyte motherboard replaced), and they had seen several examples of
    > higher priced Asus boards not working out of the box.
    >
    > I avoid Asus because we used to use them in my old job. The boss was
    > cheap, so we ended up with boards that had crap chipsets. Asus obviosuly
    > should know about the problems, but sells the items anyway.
    >
    > The Other Guy


    Well yes ASUS have some cheap motherboards too, covering all areas of
    the market I guess :). The only chipsets I've had problems with are
    sis, as far as i am concerned that should be avoided like the plague
    that is from personal expierence and also from reading countless others
    complaining about problems.

    VIA were used on ASUS boards a lot, and earlier VIA chipsets seemed to
    have their fair share of problems though I have a few VIA based chipsets
    , probably later revisions that seem to be just fine.

    They also offer Nforce based boards, Intel based boards.

    Anyway I'm just trying to point out that they have a huge variety, if
    you buy cheap ASUS products you are buying cheap, however they do make
    real quality products with quality chipsets too for a little more.

    Weight wasn't really an issue when I bought mine an extra kilo to me
    doesn't really mean much, i usually just take my laptop somewhere then
    put it on a desk, i don't think i've ever had it on my lap. to me it was
    features/screen size and $$.

    Well that is all I have to say :)

    actually I've changed my mind, I'll add this while we are talking about
    unreliable m'boards.

    Someone posted an article recently here on why lots of m'boards die, was
    down to bad capacitors on the boards and most manufacturers were having
    problems with this especially and it is still affecting boards coming
    out today, I discovered an old board I had discared due to random
    rebooting had all the caps leaking... a very widespread problem it would
    appear yet so many don't know about it

    http://www.badcaps.net
     
    Nova, Aug 10, 2005
    #10
  11. Mark C

    MarkH Guest

    Nova <> wrote in news::

    > Someone posted an article recently here on why lots of m'boards die,
    > was down to bad capacitors on the boards and most manufacturers were
    > having problems with this especially and it is still affecting boards
    > coming out today, I discovered an old board I had discared due to
    > random rebooting had all the caps leaking... a very widespread problem
    > it would appear yet so many don't know about it
    >
    > http://www.badcaps.net


    Interesting that there is no mention of which boards are still coming out
    today with bad capacitors. It would take a pretty slimy and cheap
    manufacturer to be still using known bad capacitors, the caps would have to
    be old stock going cheap because they were known to be made with the bad
    electrolyte.

    But there are definitely at least 3 years worth of motherboards from 1999
    that were made with bad capacitors.

    I seriously doubt that any of the big name brands are selling any boards
    today that have capacitor issues.



    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 25-June-05)
    "There are 10 types of people, those that
    understand binary and those that don't"
     
    MarkH, Aug 11, 2005
    #11
  12. Mark C

    Stu Fleming Guest

    MarkH wrote:

    > Interesting that there is no mention of which boards are still coming out
    > today with bad capacitors. It would take a pretty slimy and cheap
    > manufacturer to be still using known bad capacitors, the caps would have to
    > be old stock going cheap because they were known to be made with the bad
    > electrolyte.


    Wait until all the fuss has died down and/or market to naive/desperate
    customers? Manufacturer wouldn't necessarily junk stock and if you purchase
    old inventory out of a warehouse to rebrand, who would know what might be
    lurking in there...

    > But there are definitely at least 3 years worth of motherboards from 1999
    > that were made with bad capacitors.


    Hmmm. 5 GIGABYTE boards failing/failed on critical systems in the same week
    just prior to Xmas was not my idea of fun...

    Stu
    --
    IT Management. Tel: +64 3 479 5478
    Web and database hosting, Co-location. Web: http://www.wic.co.nz
    Software development. Email:
     
    Stu Fleming, Aug 11, 2005
    #12
  13. Mark C

    Tim Guest

    > I avoid Asus because we used to use them in my old job. The boss was
    > cheap, so we ended up with boards that had crap chipsets. Asus obviosuly
    > should know about the problems, but sells the items anyway.


    There will always be people demanding least cost motherboards and chipset
    vendors such as ALI / ULI / SIS / VIA fill these positions. If you buy a
    motherboard featuring one of these chipsets, you are buying on price. You
    won't get an Intel, Nvidia or the higher performance server class chipsets
    for a comparable price. There are also VM (Volume Manufacture) motherbaords
    which are not intended for consumer builds - they have a higher failure rate
    but lower cost and it is an implicit agreement that the failure rate will be
    there hence the lower price. "VM" boards are often much more picky about
    memory and configuration due to less effort put into engineering, testing,
    bios and so on. The ultimate "VM" class boards are the PC-Chips boards and
    the many no-named boards.

    SIS is a cheap chipset and regardless of mobo vendor you are likely to
    strike issues. I suggest you attribute the issues to the correct entity -
    SIS, Via in the past (the Asus A8V motherboards have a very good reputation)
    and so on.

    Manufacturers do change. EG Foxconn is now a key Intel mobo OEM
    manufacturer. Asus used to hold this position supplying (IIRC) 24 million
    mobos to Intel alone per annum out of their total production of 36 million
    mobo's p/a (stats may not be totally correct - the point is Intel does not
    make there own boards AFAIK). Foxconn was chosen to superceed Asus
    reportedly because of price. Foxconn is also Leadtek and a few other trade
    names. Previously, every (yes every) leadtek graphics card I purchased died,
    so I have a strong dislike of Leadtek. Should I attribute this bad state to
    Foxconn now?
     
    Tim, Aug 11, 2005
    #13
  14. Mark C

    Tim Guest

    Again, this issue needs to be directed at the party responsible. IE the
    motherbaord manufacturers were the second tier victims of the failures. The
    consumer was the first tier victim - early failures & ensuing costs. Some
    vendors (IE Abit) took the issue on and helped customers replace faulty
    boards, others used far less admirable methods.

    The cause of this is well known and documented. Bad Caps with a stolen
    incomplete formula.




    "Stu Fleming" <> wrote in message
    news:42fa9aaa$...
    > MarkH wrote:
    >
    >> Interesting that there is no mention of which boards are still coming out
    >> today with bad capacitors. It would take a pretty slimy and cheap
    >> manufacturer to be still using known bad capacitors, the caps would have
    >> to be old stock going cheap because they were known to be made with the
    >> bad electrolyte.

    >
    > Wait until all the fuss has died down and/or market to naive/desperate
    > customers? Manufacturer wouldn't necessarily junk stock and if you
    > purchase old inventory out of a warehouse to rebrand, who would know what
    > might be lurking in there...
    >
    >> But there are definitely at least 3 years worth of motherboards from 1999
    >> that were made with bad capacitors.

    >
    > Hmmm. 5 GIGABYTE boards failing/failed on critical systems in the same
    > week just prior to Xmas was not my idea of fun...
    >
    > Stu
    > --
    > IT Management. Tel: +64 3 479 5478
    > Web and database hosting, Co-location. Web: http://www.wic.co.nz
    > Software development. Email:
     
    Tim, Aug 11, 2005
    #14
  15. Mark C

    Rob Guest

    "Mark C" <> wrote in message
    news:42f9cc27$0$1601$...
    > OK, I *am* about to also pricespy and google away to find a good
    > laptop, but if anybody has any recommendations, that would be
    > marvelous!
    >
    > It needs to handle:
    >
    > Web browsing (dialup)
    > VoIP
    > Word processing
    >
    > Video games not required.
    >
    > I figure even the most basic laptop will do this, so something about
    > 40GB drive, 256MB RAM would be OK.
    >
    > Should I upgrade to 512MB?
    > (In my experience, extra memory is the one thing that future proofs a
    > PC.)
    >
    > In general, which brands are good, which are bad?
    >
    > Can good second-hand laptops be had?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mark


    You are better off buying new, far less hassle, and you can pick up low spec
    laptops for a little over a grand.. I ended up buying a dell almost a year
    ago, and hav't had any problems with it, and was the best bang for the buck
    at the time, but not the best support. Toshibas are suuposed to be one of
    the better brands. 512MB yes for win xp
     
    Rob, Aug 11, 2005
    #15
  16. Tim wrote:
    >>I avoid Asus because we used to use them in my old job. The boss was
    >>cheap, so we ended up with boards that had crap chipsets. Asus obviosuly
    >>should know about the problems, but sells the items anyway.

    >
    > There will always be people demanding least cost motherboards and chipset
    > vendors such as ALI / ULI / SIS / VIA fill these positions. If you buy a
    > motherboard featuring one of these chipsets, you are buying on price. You


    Motherboard manufacturers don't need to go along with this. Some don't.
    You don't find these cheap chipsets on boards from Supermicro or Tyan
    for example.

    > Foxconn was chosen to superceed Asus reportedly because of price.


    Interesting, although I've heard other reasons suggested. Asus is well
    known for deviating from offical Intel specifications and doing such
    things as offering dual Celeron motherboards, using a workaround to
    enable performance extensions in the i865 chipset that were only
    officially in the i875 chipset, and selling adaptors to allow Pentium M
    chips to run on i865/i875 P4 boards. I'm sure those things have been
    very popular with Intel, and couldn't possibly have had any influence on
    the decision to stop using them as an OEM.

    The Other Guy
     
    The Other Guy, Aug 11, 2005
    #16
  17. Mark C

    Nova Guest

    The Other Guy wrote:
    > Tim wrote:
    >
    >>> I avoid Asus because we used to use them in my old job. The boss was
    >>> cheap, so we ended up with boards that had crap chipsets. Asus
    >>> obviosuly should know about the problems, but sells the items anyway.

    >>
    >>
    >> There will always be people demanding least cost motherboards and
    >> chipset vendors such as ALI / ULI / SIS / VIA fill these positions. If
    >> you buy a motherboard featuring one of these chipsets, you are buying
    >> on price. You

    >
    >
    > Motherboard manufacturers don't need to go along with this. Some don't.
    > You don't find these cheap chipsets on boards from Supermicro or Tyan
    > for example.


    People don't really need high end boards/chipsets to view some webpages
    do they? which is why there are cheaper chipsets around, all supply and
    demand. You can just as easily buy an ASUS board with an nvidia chipset
    if you want quality, I have a p4c800-e deluxe with the intel 875
    chipset, i think most people would consider it a pretty good board
    though a bit outdated now..

    How much would a tyan m'board cost me for an amd 64 in nz?

    >
    >> Foxconn was chosen to superceed Asus reportedly because of price.

    >
    >
    > Interesting, although I've heard other reasons suggested. Asus is well
    > known for deviating from offical Intel specifications and doing such
    > things as offering dual Celeron motherboards, using a workaround to
    > enable performance extensions in the i865 chipset that were only
    > officially in the i875 chipset, and selling adaptors to allow Pentium M
    > chips to run on i865/i875 P4 boards. I'm sure those things have been
    > very popular with Intel, and couldn't possibly have had any influence on
    > the decision to stop using them as an OEM.


    Heh yeah ASUS are well known for finding ways to get more bang for your
    buck, they are loved by overclockers forums and by the end user I guess.
    they always seem to try and beat the reference design and this goes
    along with nvdia graphics products too, always fitting slightly better
    quality memory and making things slightly faster.
    The fact that so many overclcokers choose ASUS to overclock with shows
    that they are fairly decent, as if anything will show up flaws in a
    board it will be overclocking.


    >
    > The Other Guy
     
    Nova, Aug 11, 2005
    #17
  18. Mark C

    David Preece Guest

    Mark C wrote:
    > I figure even the most basic laptop will do this, so something about
    > 40GB drive, 256MB RAM would be OK.


    The base model iBook is great, but maybe a tad more than you were
    wanting to pay ($1900). Comes with 512MB, wireless, bluetooth etc
    straight from the box.

    Dave
     
    David Preece, Aug 11, 2005
    #18
  19. Mark C

    Ian Orchard Guest

    In article <>,
    David Preece <> wrote:

    > Mark C wrote:
    > > I figure even the most basic laptop will do this, so something about
    > > 40GB drive, 256MB RAM would be OK.

    >
    > The base model iBook is great, but maybe a tad more than you were
    > wanting to pay ($1900). Comes with 512MB, wireless, bluetooth etc
    > straight from the box.


    AND MacOS X Tiger which is what Microsoft hope to have whenever
    Vista/Longhorn makes it onto the streets. A positively serene operating
    system, with delightful, highly integrated bundled applications and no
    on-going expenses in keeping ahead of the malware.

    My 12" iBook is just beautiful.

    --
    ....IRO
     
    Ian Orchard, Aug 11, 2005
    #19
  20. At that very moment, Mark C turned to nz.comp and said
    > OK, I *am* about to also pricespy and google away to find a good
    > laptop, but if anybody has any recommendations, that would be
    > marvelous!


    The only consistent recommendation I have heard is the better IBM
    laptops are the most long lasting, out of the mainstream brands.



    --
    aaronl at consultant dot com
    For every expert, there is an equal and
    opposite expert. - Arthur C. Clarke
     
    Aaron Lawrence, Aug 11, 2005
    #20
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