Dodging peoples faces.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Peter Jason, Mar 7, 2013.

  1. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    I use PS CS6 but I get a ugly reddish tone that I
    can improve with the sponge tool but this just
    washes out the color.
    How can I use the Color Balance within the dodging
    circle?
    Peter
     
    Peter Jason, Mar 7, 2013
    #1
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  2. Peter Jason

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 15:39:45 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2013-03-07 14:58:03 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >
    >> I use PS CS6 but I get a ugly reddish tone that I
    >> can improve with the sponge tool but this just
    >> washes out the color.
    >> How can I use the Color Balance within the dodging
    >> circle?
    >> Peter

    >
    >Since you are using CS6, I would go about it in one of two ways.
    >
    >If you are shooting RAW, use the adjustment brush in ACR.
    >
    >Otherwise if you are already in CS5/6, open a levels adjustment layer.
    >Tweak to taste for the face (ignore how the adjustment effects the rest
    >of the image. Add a layer mask filled with black to the adjustment
    >layer and paint in the adjustment with a medium white brush. Adjust
    >opacity of the adjustment layer to taste.


    With all due respect, Duck, the mask suggestion is going about it the
    long way. You are removing 90-some percent to adjust 10 percent.
    Making a Selection is the easy way to adjust a small part of an image.

    The Quick Mask is an overlooked tool. It has the same characteristics
    of the Layer mask (black for including/white for erasing inclusions)
    and works very well when the image is zoomed up.

    Now that I think about, I don't know if Quick Mask is in CS6. It is
    in mine, but I may have moved it in from an earlier version of CS. You
    can do that, you know.

    I use Quick Mask quite a bit...especially when cloning. I'll make a
    selection of the area where the cloning is to go and then I don't have
    to be precise with the clone tool. It's limited to the selected area.
    Gotta remember to invert after creating the selection or the
    adjustments will apply everywhere except the selected area.

    I'll use the Layer Mask when the changes are to be made in a larger
    area or a number of small areas. A tip there that some don't know
    about is to hit the \ key when painting with black to have the painted
    area show up in red. Just like when using the Quick Mask.

    I like making this kind of adjustment in the opened file rather than
    in RAW. I can do several layers at various settings and, by turning
    on and off the layer, see which one works the best. After I make the
    Selection, I save the selection in case I have to bring it into a
    different layer.




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 8, 2013
    #2
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  3. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 19:25:57 -0500, Tony Cooper
    <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 15:39:45 -0800, Savageduck
    ><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >
    >>On 2013-03-07 14:58:03 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >>
    >>> I use PS CS6 but I get a ugly reddish tone that I
    >>> can improve with the sponge tool but this just
    >>> washes out the color.
    >>> How can I use the Color Balance within the dodging
    >>> circle?
    >>> Peter

    >>
    >>Since you are using CS6, I would go about it in one of two ways.
    >>
    >>If you are shooting RAW, use the adjustment brush in ACR.
    >>
    >>Otherwise if you are already in CS5/6, open a levels adjustment layer.
    >>Tweak to taste for the face (ignore how the adjustment effects the rest
    >>of the image. Add a layer mask filled with black to the adjustment
    >>layer and paint in the adjustment with a medium white brush. Adjust
    >>opacity of the adjustment layer to taste.

    >
    >With all due respect, Duck, the mask suggestion is going about it the
    >long way. You are removing 90-some percent to adjust 10 percent.
    >Making a Selection is the easy way to adjust a small part of an image.
    >
    >The Quick Mask is an overlooked tool. It has the same characteristics
    >of the Layer mask (black for including/white for erasing inclusions)
    >and works very well when the image is zoomed up.
    >
    >Now that I think about, I don't know if Quick Mask is in CS6. It is
    >in mine, but I may have moved it in from an earlier version of CS. You
    >can do that, you know.
    >
    >I use Quick Mask quite a bit...especially when cloning. I'll make a
    >selection of the area where the cloning is to go and then I don't have
    >to be precise with the clone tool. It's limited to the selected area.
    >Gotta remember to invert after creating the selection or the
    >adjustments will apply everywhere except the selected area.
    >


    It seems to be called the "Quick Selection Tool"
    in CS6.



    >I'll use the Layer Mask when the changes are to be made in a larger
    >area or a number of small areas. A tip there that some don't know
    >about is to hit the \ key when painting with black to have the painted
    >area show up in red. Just like when using the Quick Mask.
    >
    >I like making this kind of adjustment in the opened file rather than
    >in RAW. I can do several layers at various settings and, by turning
    >on and off the layer, see which one works the best. After I make the
    >Selection, I save the selection in case I have to bring it into a
    >different layer.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Peter Jason, Mar 8, 2013
    #3
  4. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 15:39:45 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2013-03-07 14:58:03 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >
    >> I use PS CS6 but I get a ugly reddish tone that I
    >> can improve with the sponge tool but this just
    >> washes out the color.
    >> How can I use the Color Balance within the dodging
    >> circle?
    >> Peter

    >
    >Since you are using CS6, I would go about it in one of two ways.
    >
    >If you are shooting RAW, use the adjustment brush in ACR.
    >
    >Otherwise if you are already in CS5/6, open a levels adjustment layer.
    >Tweak to taste for the face (ignore how the adjustment effects the rest
    >of the image. Add a layer mask filled with black to the adjustment
    >layer and paint in the adjustment with a medium white brush. Adjust
    >opacity of the adjustment layer to taste.


    Some groups are very hard to get right because
    some people are swarthy, and babies are almost
    white. Sometimes I can do two crops of the same
    image to isolate each, but usually it takes a lot
    of dodging, and now magnetic -lassoing.
     
    Peter Jason, Mar 8, 2013
    #4
  5. Peter Jason

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 12:45:23 +1100, Peter Jason <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 19:25:57 -0500, Tony Cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 15:39:45 -0800, Savageduck
    >><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 2013-03-07 14:58:03 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> I use PS CS6 but I get a ugly reddish tone that I
    >>>> can improve with the sponge tool but this just
    >>>> washes out the color.
    >>>> How can I use the Color Balance within the dodging
    >>>> circle?
    >>>> Peter
    >>>
    >>>Since you are using CS6, I would go about it in one of two ways.
    >>>
    >>>If you are shooting RAW, use the adjustment brush in ACR.
    >>>
    >>>Otherwise if you are already in CS5/6, open a levels adjustment layer.
    >>>Tweak to taste for the face (ignore how the adjustment effects the rest
    >>>of the image. Add a layer mask filled with black to the adjustment
    >>>layer and paint in the adjustment with a medium white brush. Adjust
    >>>opacity of the adjustment layer to taste.

    >>
    >>With all due respect, Duck, the mask suggestion is going about it the
    >>long way. You are removing 90-some percent to adjust 10 percent.
    >>Making a Selection is the easy way to adjust a small part of an image.
    >>
    >>The Quick Mask is an overlooked tool. It has the same characteristics
    >>of the Layer mask (black for including/white for erasing inclusions)
    >>and works very well when the image is zoomed up.
    >>
    >>Now that I think about, I don't know if Quick Mask is in CS6. It is
    >>in mine, but I may have moved it in from an earlier version of CS. You
    >>can do that, you know.
    >>
    >>I use Quick Mask quite a bit...especially when cloning. I'll make a
    >>selection of the area where the cloning is to go and then I don't have
    >>to be precise with the clone tool. It's limited to the selected area.
    >>Gotta remember to invert after creating the selection or the
    >>adjustments will apply everywhere except the selected area.
    >>

    >
    >It seems to be called the "Quick Selection Tool"
    >in CS6.


    No, that's a different tool. The Quick Mask is down below the color
    squares. Unclicked, it's "Edit in Standard Mode" and clicked it is
    "Edit in Quick Mask Mode". Click it, choose a brush and set the brush
    size and hardness, and paint over what you want to select. With the
    color as black, what you paint turns red. With the color as white,
    you can un-paint what you've painted. After painting in your
    selection, go back to Edit in Standard Mode and your selection will be
    there shown with "marching ants".

    The Quick Selection Tool basically selects by color, but it will jump
    to similar colors. Using the Quick Mask, you make your selection by
    painting over it, so color has nothing to do with the selection. You
    can get very precise using a small, hard brush or you can use a soft
    brush for a feathered edge.

    Get to know how to do this. Whether you use Duck's suggestion or
    mine, knowing what each tool does will eventually be helpful.






    >
    >
    >>I'll use the Layer Mask when the changes are to be made in a larger
    >>area or a number of small areas. A tip there that some don't know
    >>about is to hit the \ key when painting with black to have the painted
    >>area show up in red. Just like when using the Quick Mask.
    >>
    >>I like making this kind of adjustment in the opened file rather than
    >>in RAW. I can do several layers at various settings and, by turning
    >>on and off the layer, see which one works the best. After I make the
    >>Selection, I save the selection in case I have to bring it into a
    >>different layer.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 8, 2013
    #5
  6. Peter Jason

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 17:26:03 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >The Quick Mask is not overlooked in my bag of tricks, but I don't use
    >it much for selecting areas to be adjusted. As you say, the effort of
    >selecting the area to be adjusted is similar with both methods. However
    >by using an adjustment layer to make the broad adjustment, and then
    >using the adjustment layer mask so I can see the effect as I paint it
    >in works for me. By using a soft edged brush and reduced brush opacity
    >& flow I can get very good control, but that's me.
    >

    While I don't reject your way, and sometimes do it that way, I really
    don't like changing the image globally when I'm making an adjustment
    to one fairly small area. I like to see how that area looks in
    comparison to the rest of the image.
    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 8, 2013
    #6
  7. Peter Jason

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 18:46:23 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2013-03-07 17:48:06 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >
    >> On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 15:39:45 -0800, Savageduck
    >> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2013-03-07 14:58:03 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> I use PS CS6 but I get a ugly reddish tone that I
    >>>> can improve with the sponge tool but this just
    >>>> washes out the color.
    >>>> How can I use the Color Balance within the dodging
    >>>> circle?
    >>>> Peter
    >>>
    >>> Since you are using CS6, I would go about it in one of two ways.
    >>>
    >>> If you are shooting RAW, use the adjustment brush in ACR.
    >>>
    >>> Otherwise if you are already in CS5/6, open a levels adjustment layer.
    >>> Tweak to taste for the face (ignore how the adjustment effects the rest
    >>> of the image. Add a layer mask filled with black to the adjustment
    >>> layer and paint in the adjustment with a medium white brush. Adjust
    >>> opacity of the adjustment layer to taste.

    >>
    >> Some groups are very hard to get right because
    >> some people are swarthy, and babies are almost
    >> white. Sometimes I can do two crops of the same
    >> image to isolate each, but usually it takes a lot
    >> of dodging, and now magnetic -lassoing.

    >
    >This is where Tony and I differ on preferred method.
    >
    >What you have just said is a good reason for using adjustment layers.
    >As an example let's say you have an image with three different facial
    >skin types present, (and that might be with three or more individuals).
    >By using adjustment layers + adjustment layer masks, you can make the
    >appropriate adjustments for each skin type on separate layers and paint
    >in the effect on each of the faces. One layer at a time that is. ;-)


    What's that? How is that different? And who says that my "preferred
    method" is the Quick Mask? I don't have a "preferred method" for
    this. The Quick Mask is one choice among many. I'll look at the
    image, decide what I want to change, and then decide on a method.

    Using the Quick Mask, I can either do three layers for three faces or
    one layer with three selections. The difference is that you are
    applying the adjustment globally to the entire image on each layer,
    and I'm applying the adjustment to only the selected area on each
    layer. I do this because I like to see the adjusted area in
    comparison to the rest of the image.

    Even using one layer with three selected areas, I can come back and
    change the adjustment by reloading my saved selection.

    >Layers are one of the most powerful features of Photoshop and it is
    >well worthwhile learning as much as you can about them.


    Well, yeah, but that has nothing to do with Layer Mask vs Quick Mask.
    Either way, you make the adjustments on a new layer.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 8, 2013
    #7
  8. Peter Jason

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 18:46:23 -0800, Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com>
    wrote:
    : On 2013-03-07 17:48:06 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    : > Some groups are very hard to get right because
    : > some people are swarthy, and babies are almost
    : > white. Sometimes I can do two crops of the same
    : > image to isolate each, but usually it takes a lot
    : > of dodging, and now magnetic -lassoing.
    :
    : This is where Tony and I differ on preferred method.
    :
    : What you have just said is a good reason for using adjustment layers.
    : As an example let's say you have an image with three different facial
    : skin types present, (and that might be with three or more individuals).
    : By using adjustment layers + adjustment layer masks, you can make the
    : appropriate adjustments for each skin type on separate layers and paint
    : in the effect on each of the faces. One layer at a time that is. ;-)

    Forgive my confusion, but what exactly is meant by "the appropriate
    adjustments for each skin type"? Is there a compelling reason not to show
    people as they actually are, assuming that you've selected a white balance
    that makes sense for the overall scene?

    To put it another way: If you could go back and shoot the picture again, would
    you shine a different colored light in each subject's face in order to produce
    the most flattering image of each? Even if you succeeded, wouldn't it look
    artificial and silly if examined in any but the most cursory manner?

    I don't want to join the discussion of how to use Photoshop, if for no other
    reason than that it's a subject on which I'm an ignoramus. But you guys are
    doing nothing to dispel an outsider's suspicion that Photoshop's vast array of
    capabilities and options are both its best feature and its worst.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 8, 2013
    #8
  9. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    On Fri, 8 Mar 2013 14:07:05 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2013-03-08 05:15:22 -0800, Robert Coe <> said:
    >
    >> On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 18:46:23 -0800, Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com>
    >> wrote:
    >> : On 2013-03-07 17:48:06 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >> : > Some groups are very hard to get right because
    >> : > some people are swarthy, and babies are almost
    >> : > white. Sometimes I can do two crops of the same
    >> : > image to isolate each, but usually it takes a lot
    >> : > of dodging, and now magnetic -lassoing.
    >> :
    >> : This is where Tony and I differ on preferred method.
    >> :
    >> : What you have just said is a good reason for using adjustment layers.
    >> : As an example let's say you have an image with three different facial
    >> : skin types present, (and that might be with three or more individuals).
    >> : By using adjustment layers + adjustment layer masks, you can make the
    >> : appropriate adjustments for each skin type on separate layers and paint
    >> : in the effect on each of the faces. One layer at a time that is. ;-)
    >>
    >> Forgive my confusion, but what exactly is meant by "the appropriate
    >> adjustments for each skin type"? Is there a compelling reason not to show
    >> people as they actually are, assuming that you've selected a white balance
    >> that makes sense for the overall scene?

    >
    >Let's put that response into context.
    >
    >It seems the OP, Peter Jason has a desire to apply different
    >adjustments to different faces in a group shot. The Peter indicated
    >that he had a problem with this by stating the following:
    >"Some groups are very hard to get right because
    >some people are swarthy, and babies are almost
    >white. Sometimes I can do two crops of the same
    >image to isolate each, but usually it takes a lot
    >of dodging, and now magnetic -lassoing."
    >
    >So where I said, "the appropriate adjustments for each skin type" I
    >probably should have said, "the adjustments you (the OP) desire for
    >each skin type".
    >
    >> To put it another way: If you could go back and shoot the picture again, would
    >> you shine a different colored light in each subject's face in order to produce
    >> the most flattering image of each? Even if you succeeded, wouldn't it look
    >> artificial and silly if examined in any but the most cursory manner?

    >
    >...but I am not the photographer who feels that this is a problem, and
    >I am not the individual seeking a solution with Photoshop. I am just
    >providing what might be one of many solutions to be found in photoshop.
    >
    >> I don't want to join the discussion of how to use Photoshop, if for no other
    >> reason than that it's a subject on which I'm an ignoramus. But you guys are
    >> doing nothing to dispel an outsider's suspicion that Photoshop's vast array of
    >> capabilities and options are both its best feature and its worst.
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    >In an odd way that might well be true. However, there are times when
    >one particular method to fix a problem can lead to a better result than
    >another, and the same method might prove to be less satisfactory under
    >different circumstances.
    >Personally I would prefer to have more than a single tool in my bag of
    >tricks than being locked into a single method which might work well for
    >one image and not so great for another.


    I have seized a copy of..
    "Lynda.com Photoshop CS5 One-on-One Advanced"
    and I am slowly going thru it.
    Also:
    I am trying to learn Adobe PremierPro, and am I
    right in assuming that when split into clips, all
    the photoshop methods work within a particular
    clip? As far as I can tell one loads the PShop
    desired adjustments (from within PremierPro) and
    the adjustments then made. The clips are stored
    with the PShop facilities still in the background
    for later use if necessary. So that if I know
    something of PS then the adjustments in PPro are
    easier.
     
    Peter Jason, Mar 9, 2013
    #9
  10. Peter Jason

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 08:15:22 -0500, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 18:46:23 -0800, Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com>
    >wrote:
    >: On 2013-03-07 17:48:06 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >: > Some groups are very hard to get right because
    >: > some people are swarthy, and babies are almost
    >: > white. Sometimes I can do two crops of the same
    >: > image to isolate each, but usually it takes a lot
    >: > of dodging, and now magnetic -lassoing.
    >:
    >: This is where Tony and I differ on preferred method.
    >:
    >: What you have just said is a good reason for using adjustment layers.
    >: As an example let's say you have an image with three different facial
    >: skin types present, (and that might be with three or more individuals).
    >: By using adjustment layers + adjustment layer masks, you can make the
    >: appropriate adjustments for each skin type on separate layers and paint
    >: in the effect on each of the faces. One layer at a time that is. ;-)
    >
    >Forgive my confusion, but what exactly is meant by "the appropriate
    >adjustments for each skin type"? Is there a compelling reason not to show
    >people as they actually are, assuming that you've selected a white balance
    >that makes sense for the overall scene?
    >
    >To put it another way: If you could go back and shoot the picture again, would
    >you shine a different colored light in each subject's face in order to produce
    >the most flattering image of each? Even if you succeeded, wouldn't it look
    >artificial and silly if examined in any but the most cursory manner?
    >
    >I don't want to join the discussion of how to use Photoshop, if for no other
    >reason than that it's a subject on which I'm an ignoramus. But you guys are
    >doing nothing to dispel an outsider's suspicion that Photoshop's vast array of
    >capabilities and options are both its best feature and its worst.
    >
    >Bob


    I don't adjust skin tone, but I do adjust faces. This is Babe Ruth
    baseball season, and the grandsons are playing. Photographing the
    boys on the field does not always offer the choice of position
    regarding the sun. Sometimes the faces are in shadow, but the overall
    image is such that I can't bring up the entire image. So, I'll bring
    out the face from the shadow. Not much, because I want the natural
    look, but some.

    My own comments regarding the use of Quick Mask vs Layer Mask were
    more to do with an alternative way of applying some adjustment to a
    particular area by use of a Selection. It isn't about skin tone; it's
    about any non-global adjustment.

    You've seen my photos, and you've seen the Duck's. Do you think we
    produce "artificial and silly" results?



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 9, 2013
    #10
  11. Peter Jason

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 23:14:47 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2013-03-07 22:05:45 -0800, Tony Cooper <> said:
    >
    >> On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 18:46:23 -0800, Savageduck
    >> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2013-03-07 17:48:06 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 15:39:45 -0800, Savageduck
    >>>> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 2013-03-07 14:58:03 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I use PS CS6 but I get a ugly reddish tone that I
    >>>>>> can improve with the sponge tool but this just
    >>>>>> washes out the color.
    >>>>>> How can I use the Color Balance within the dodging
    >>>>>> circle?
    >>>>>> Peter
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Since you are using CS6, I would go about it in one of two ways.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If you are shooting RAW, use the adjustment brush in ACR.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Otherwise if you are already in CS5/6, open a levels adjustment layer.
    >>>>> Tweak to taste for the face (ignore how the adjustment effects the rest
    >>>>> of the image. Add a layer mask filled with black to the adjustment
    >>>>> layer and paint in the adjustment with a medium white brush. Adjust
    >>>>> opacity of the adjustment layer to taste.
    >>>>
    >>>> Some groups are very hard to get right because
    >>>> some people are swarthy, and babies are almost
    >>>> white. Sometimes I can do two crops of the same
    >>>> image to isolate each, but usually it takes a lot
    >>>> of dodging, and now magnetic -lassoing.
    >>>
    >>> This is where Tony and I differ on preferred method.
    >>>
    >>> What you have just said is a good reason for using adjustment layers.
    >>> As an example let's say you have an image with three different facial
    >>> skin types present, (and that might be with three or more individuals).
    >>> By using adjustment layers + adjustment layer masks, you can make the
    >>> appropriate adjustments for each skin type on separate layers and paint
    >>> in the effect on each of the faces. One layer at a time that is. ;-)

    >>
    >> What's that? How is that different? And who says that my "preferred
    >> method" is the Quick Mask? I don't have a "preferred method" for
    >> this. The Quick Mask is one choice among many. I'll look at the
    >> image, decide what I want to change, and then decide on a method.

    >
    >Don't get your knickers in a knot!
    >Since you started down the road of touting Quick Mask, yours truly at
    >least, can easily be led to believe that "Quick Mask" was a method, out
    >of the many available, you preferred in making this type of fix. This
    >lead me to simply state that we differed with regard our preferred
    >method. I am quite familiar with "Quick Mask" and I actually use it a
    >fair amount, just not for this particular adjustment.
    >We both know that there is more than one way to do most things in PS
    >and each of us has developed our individual workflows around methods,
    >tools and features with which we have become comfortable.


    My knickers are not in a twist.

    But, I don't like the use of "preferred" when referring to a way that
    I do something. I'm familiar with enough different ways to achieve
    the same objective in Adobe products that I decide how I'm going to do
    an adjustment based on what has to be and the overall image.

    "Touting" is a rather offensive term to me. It implies trying to sell
    or convince someone do something a particular way or to use a
    particular product. What I try to do is suggest knowing how to work
    with as many of the tools available in Photoshop as possible

    >> Using the Quick Mask, I can either do three layers for three faces or
    >> one layer with three selections. The difference is that you are
    >> applying the adjustment globally to the entire image on each layer,
    >> and I'm applying the adjustment to only the selected area on each
    >> layer. I do this because I like to see the adjusted area in
    >> comparison to the rest of the image.

    >
    >...and that comparison is quite visible when using layer masks.
    >
    >> Even using one layer with three selected areas, I can come back and
    >> change the adjustment by reloading my saved selection.

    >
    >Whatever works for you.


    Could you be more dismissive?
    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 9, 2013
    #11
  12. Peter Jason

    PeterN Guest

    On 3/7/2013 8:26 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2013-03-07 16:25:57 -0800, Tony Cooper <> said:
    >
    >> On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 15:39:45 -0800, Savageduck
    >> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2013-03-07 14:58:03 -0800, Peter Jason <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> I use PS CS6 but I get a ugly reddish tone that I
    >>>> can improve with the sponge tool but this just
    >>>> washes out the color.
    >>>> How can I use the Color Balance within the dodging
    >>>> circle?
    >>>> Peter
    >>>
    >>> Since you are using CS6, I would go about it in one of two ways.
    >>>
    >>> If you are shooting RAW, use the adjustment brush in ACR.
    >>>
    >>> Otherwise if you are already in CS5/6, open a levels adjustment layer.
    >>> Tweak to taste for the face (ignore how the adjustment effects the rest
    >>> of the image. Add a layer mask filled with black to the adjustment
    >>> layer and paint in the adjustment with a medium white brush. Adjust
    >>> opacity of the adjustment layer to taste.

    >>
    >> With all due respect, Duck, the mask suggestion is going about it the
    >> long way. You are removing 90-some percent to adjust 10 percent.
    >> Making a Selection is the easy way to adjust a small part of an image.

    >
    > As with all things Photoshop there is more than one way to reach the
    > desired result, and each might suit a different user and each might have
    > its own peculiarities.
    >
    >> The Quick Mask is an overlooked tool. It has the same characteristics
    >> of the Layer mask (black for including/white for erasing inclusions)
    >> and works very well when the image is zoomed up.

    >
    > The Quick Mask is not overlooked in my bag of tricks, but I don't use it
    > much for selecting areas to be adjusted. As you say, the effort of
    > selecting the area to be adjusted is similar with both methods. However
    > by using an adjustment layer to make the broad adjustment, and then
    > using the adjustment layer mask so I can see the effect as I paint it in
    > works for me. By using a soft edged brush and reduced brush opacity &
    > flow I can get very good control, but that's me.
    >
    >> Now that I think about, I don't know if Quick Mask is in CS6.

    >
    > It should be.


    It is.



    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Mar 9, 2013
    #12
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