DO TUNGSTEN LAMPS BURN OUT WHEN YOU TURN THEM ON??

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Dr. Slick, Oct 18, 2003.

  1. Dr. Slick

    Dr. Slick Guest

    Hello,

    Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    off
    a lot? One of mine blew out, but only when i was turning it on. It
    has been on for about 30 minutes total, but i was turning it on for
    only 5 minutes at a time.

    Was this just a bad lamp, or should i just leave them on longer?

    I was trying to save the useful spectrum life.


    Thanks,

    Slick
    Dr. Slick, Oct 18, 2003
    #1
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  2. In article <>, radio913
    @aol.com says...
    > Hello,
    >
    > Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    > off
    > a lot?


    In general, 1 time on and off equals to 1 hour life time of the bulb.


    --

    Looking for a dream holiday?
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    Palm Cove- Winner of this years Award "Australia's Cleanest Beach"
    Gerhard Beulke, Oct 18, 2003
    #2
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  3. Dr. Slick

    Mick Ruthven Guest

    From a different context, aircraft "pulse llights" for recognition by other
    aircraft turn a landing light on and off continuously and the light seems to
    suffer no ill effects.

    "Gerhard Beulke" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > In general, 1 time on and off equals to 1 hour life time of the bulb.
    Mick Ruthven, Oct 18, 2003
    #3
  4. Gerhard Beulke wrote:
    > > In general, 1 time on and off equals to 1 hour life time of the bulb.


    Mick Ruthven wrote:
    > From a different context, aircraft "pulse llights" for recognition by
    > other aircraft turn a landing light on and off continuously and the
    > light seems to suffer no ill effects.


    I've noticed a lot of those pulsed landing lights lately, and the ones I've
    seen don't just switch off and on. They fade up and down, which is much more
    gentle to the lamp.

    -Mike
    Michael Geary, Oct 18, 2003
    #4
  5. In article <pc5kb.1502$>, mr@impact-
    consult.com says...
    > From a different context, aircraft "pulse llights" for recognition by other
    > aircraft turn a landing light on and off continuously and the light seems to
    > suffer no ill effects.


    Different temperature and spectrum.
    We are talking about lights for photography?


    --

    Looking for a dream holiday?
    http://www.palmcove.net/
    Palm Cove- Winner of this years Award "Australia's Cleanest Beach"
    Gerhard Beulke, Oct 18, 2003
    #5
  6. Dr. Slick

    Kamox Guest

    > Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    > off a lot?


    I read somewhere that on-off switching accounts for 95% of total tungsten
    filament wearing, so I'd say yes.

    Kamox.
    Kamox, Oct 18, 2003
    #6
  7. Dr. Slick

    Brothermark Guest

    Re: TURN YOUR CAPS OFF

    ITS VERY SELFISH
    Brothermark, Oct 18, 2003
    #7
  8. In general yes. It is hard to measure exactly as it depends on the
    construction of the light and how long it is on and off during the cycle
    etc.

    Florescent lamps are worse and some years ago the break even point for
    them (total operating cost, including electricity, cost of the lamp and the
    cost of replacing them in a commercial environment) was found to be about 55
    minutes. This was one of my Economics/statistics projects.

    It is my understanding it is a lot shorter for incandescent lamps, more
    like 5 minutes. I would tend to believe photofloods may be different do to
    their design, but I am not sure if that time would be longer or shorter.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


    "Dr. Slick" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    > off
    > a lot? One of mine blew out, but only when i was turning it on. It
    > has been on for about 30 minutes total, but i was turning it on for
    > only 5 minutes at a time.
    >
    > Was this just a bad lamp, or should i just leave them on longer?
    >
    > I was trying to save the useful spectrum life.
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Slick
    Joseph Meehan, Oct 18, 2003
    #8
  9. Dr. Slick

    Darrell Guest

    "Dr. Slick" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    > off
    > a lot? One of mine blew out, but only when i was turning it on. It
    > has been on for about 30 minutes total, but i was turning it on for
    > only 5 minutes at a time.
    >
    > Was this just a bad lamp, or should i just leave them on longer?
    >
    > I was trying to save the useful spectrum life.
    >

    Depends on the bulb... Enlarger bulbs are made for on for a minute to focus,
    off on for a few seconds, off... on... I don't know if they are made any
    differently in the filament design.
    Darrell, Oct 18, 2003
    #9
  10. Dr. Slick

    davidjudy Guest

    The thermal shock (sudden expansion of the filament) of turn-on places a lot
    of stress on it. If you can use a dimmer to run it up slowly.

    DJ


    "Dr. Slick" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    > off
    > a lot? One of mine blew out, but only when i was turning it on. It
    > has been on for about 30 minutes total, but i was turning it on for
    > only 5 minutes at a time.
    >
    > Was this just a bad lamp, or should i just leave them on longer?
    >
    > I was trying to save the useful spectrum life.
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Slick
    davidjudy, Oct 18, 2003
    #10
  11. In article <>,
    (Dr. Slick) wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    > off
    > a lot? One of mine blew out, but only when i was turning it on. It
    > has been on for about 30 minutes total, but i was turning it on for
    > only 5 minutes at a time.
    > Was this just a bad lamp, or should i just leave them on longer?
    > I was trying to save the useful spectrum life.
    > Thanks,
    > Slick



    It depends are they enlarger bulbs? I have a halogen bulb in my enlarger
    that has lasted two years of on and off usage. The last two years I have been
    doing a lot more printing. So in this case, use seems to correlate to longevity.

    30 minutes = 1800 seconds divide that by your average exposure 15 seconds
    yields 120 exposures "not alot" so it could be the enlarger socket.

    However:
    If these bulbs of yours are photo Flood lamps like 3200K screw based bulbs
    used in Hot Studio lamps the usefull life "IS" 30 minutes.

    --


    website:
    http://members.bellatlantic.net/~gblank
    Gregory W. Blank, Oct 18, 2003
    #11
  12. Dr. Slick

    Rafe B. Guest

    On 17 Oct 2003 22:10:39 -0700, (Dr. Slick) wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    > Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    >off
    >a lot? One of mine blew out, but only when i was turning it on. It
    >has been on for about 30 minutes total, but i was turning it on for
    >only 5 minutes at a time.
    >
    > Was this just a bad lamp, or should i just leave them on longer?
    >
    > I was trying to save the useful spectrum life.



    Then just leave it on. Or put it on a dimmer, and always
    turn it on or off using the dimmer.

    In incandescent lamps, the resistance of the filament
    is very low when the bulb is off.

    That means that there will be a large rush of current
    through the filament as the bulb is initially turned on.

    Nine times out of ten, when an incandescent bulb
    reaches end-of-life, it dies at the moment when it's
    turned on.


    rafe b.
    http://www.terrapinphoto.com
    Rafe B., Oct 18, 2003
    #12
  13. "davidjudy" <> wrote in message
    news:3f913415$0$28119$...
    > The thermal shock (sudden expansion of the filament) of turn-on places a

    lot
    > of stress on it. If you can use a dimmer to run it up slowly.


    This is true. The turn-on current is many times higher than the operating
    current. Ramping them up with a dimmer will extend the life.
    Charles Schuler, Oct 18, 2003
    #13
  14. Gerhard Beulke wrote:
    > In article <>, radio913
    > @aol.com says...
    >
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    >> off a lot?

    >
    >
    > In general, 1 time on and off equals to 1 hour life time of the bulb.
    >
    >
    >

    I have not tested these thins, but your statement agrees with my
    impression of what I get with normal household bulbs. For photoflood
    bulbs I used to use with 4-hour lifespans, this does not seem to be
    true. People did use to just reduce the filament voltage when they were
    not using them for actual picture taking to prolong their life, but all
    that stuff has probably disappeared these days when people use
    tungsten-halide lamps or electronic flash.

    --
    .~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User 85642.
    /V\ Registered Machine 73926.
    /( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey http://counter.li.org
    ^^-^^ 9:05am up 9 days, 19:18, 2 users, load average: 2.06, 2.14, 2.16
    Jean-David Beyer, Oct 18, 2003
    #14
  15. Dr. Slick

    Jorg Guest

    On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 08:56:27 -0400, "Charles Schuler"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"davidjudy" <> wrote in message
    >news:3f913415$0$28119$...
    >> The thermal shock (sudden expansion of the filament) of turn-on places a

    >lot
    >> of stress on it. If you can use a dimmer to run it up slowly.

    >
    >This is true. The turn-on current is many times higher than the operating
    >current. Ramping them up with a dimmer will extend the life.
    >


    And logical, as the resistivity of the cold wire is much hire.
    Jorg, Oct 18, 2003
    #15
  16. In article <>, says...
    >
    > I have not tested these thins, but your statement agrees with my
    > impression of what I get with normal household bulbs. For photoflood
    > bulbs I used to use with 4-hour lifespans, this does not seem to be
    > true. People did use to just reduce the filament voltage when they were
    > not using them for actual picture taking to prolong their life, but all
    > that stuff has probably disappeared these days when people use
    > tungsten-halide lamps or electronic flash.


    That's why I wrote *in general*.
    Some bulbs more, some less...
    It depends on material used, temperature, voltage, gas etc etc


    --

    Looking for a dream holiday?
    http://www.palmcove.net/
    Palm Cove- Winner of this years Award "Australia's Cleanest Beach"
    Gerhard Beulke, Oct 18, 2003
    #16
  17. Dr. Slick

    Don Stauffer Guest

    There are special circuits that ease thermal shock of turnon-off, but
    almost no lamps nor bulbs use it. The result is that yes, with ordinary
    bulbs the thermal shock of turning on and off is very severe.

    "Dr. Slick" wrote:
    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > Do tungsten lamps burn out more quickly when you turn them on and
    > off
    > a lot? One of mine blew out, but only when i was turning it on. It
    > has been on for about 30 minutes total, but i was turning it on for
    > only 5 minutes at a time.
    >
    > Was this just a bad lamp, or should i just leave them on longer?
    >
    > I was trying to save the useful spectrum life.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Slick


    --
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

    webpage- http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer
    Don Stauffer, Oct 18, 2003
    #17
  18. Dr. Slick

    George Kerby Guest

    YES THEY WILL EVENTUALLY: ESPECIALLY IF YOU SHOUT LIKE THIS WHEN YOU ARE
    CLOSE BY!!!


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    George Kerby, Oct 18, 2003
    #18
  19. Dr. Slick

    Sam Smith Guest

    Re: TURN YOUR CAPS OFF

    WHAT?


    "Brothermark" <> wrote in message
    news:bmr1p0$q2je7$-berlin.de...
    > ITS VERY SELFISH
    >
    >
    Sam Smith, Oct 18, 2003
    #19
  20. Dr. Slick

    Steve Young Guest

    > >>"davidjudy"
    > >> The thermal shock (sudden expansion of the filament) of turn-on places
    > >>a lot of stress on it. If you can use a dimmer to run it up slowly.


    > > "Charles Schuler"<> wrote:
    > >This is true. The turn-on current is many times higher than the operating
    > >current. Ramping them up with a dimmer will extend the life.


    > "Jorg" <> wrote
    > And logical, as the resistivity of the cold wire is much hire.


    No, the resistance of the cold filament is lower. causing higher current and
    much higher magnetic flux, which gives the filament a good shake with the
    initial in-rush. A light bulb's filament isn't that far away, temperature wise,
    from molting metal.
    Steve Young, Oct 18, 2003
    #20
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