DNS and cisco routers

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Sako, Feb 1, 2007.

  1. Sako

    Sako Guest

    Hi gents, my domain machines don't work correctly with my dns, but
    they do with my dhcp , so I wonder if there is any parameter such as
    ip helper-address for dhcp, that should be configured to make dns work
    in different connected networks.

    Thanks in advance .
     
    Sako, Feb 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. Sako

    Guest

    In article <>, "Sako" <> writes:
    > Hi gents, my domain machines don't work correctly with my dns, but
    > they do with my dhcp , so I wonder if there is any parameter such as
    > ip helper-address for dhcp, that should be configured to make dns work
    > in different connected networks.


    No. There isn't. See (1) below.

    Walter Roberson provided a relevant response only moments ago in an
    unrelated thread. Your posting exemplifies what he is talking about.

    From: (Walter Roberson)
    Message-ID: <Sopwh.836941$1T2.270116@pd7urf2no>

    [...]
    Shahin,

    The great majority of questions that are posted here are not
    precise enough to determine what the user is -really- observing,
    or to determine what the user -really- wants to do. What the
    user -really- wants to do is often different than what the user -asks-
    to do.

    When the people who *volunteer* their time to answer questions
    encounter an ambiguous question, or a situation that strongly
    suggests to them that the user is taking the wrong approach, they
    have several options on how to proceed:

    1) answer the question that was actually posted and only that question.
    The most common answer would likely be, "You can't do that.", because
    people often make mistakes in their postings;

    2) point out some ambiguities in the question or situation and ask the
    poster to clarify what they want;

    3) list several meanings that the poster -might- have intended, and
    provide answers for each of the -possible- meanings; this can take
    literally hours to write up, whereas just asking the poster to clarify
    might take only a few minutes;

    4) Use intuition, experience, and creative mind-reading to decide
    what the poster -really- needs, and answer that;

    5) decide that it isn't worth the time of the answerer to try to
    go back and forth with the poster to figure out what the real situation
    is, and so simply not answer at all.

    I have been around enough and have answered enough technical questions
    (20,000 or so), that I have developed a relatively good sense of when
    posted questions are not the right ones for the situation. I find,
    though, that I no longer have time to answer all the -possible-
    meanings, so more and more I am pointing out different possible
    meanings and asking for clarification.
     
    , Feb 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. Sako

    Sako Guest

    Thanks for the answer, will try a different approach.

    On 1 feb, 18:46, wrote:
    > In article <>, "Sako" <> writes:
    >
    > > Hi gents, my domain machines don't work correctly with my dns, but
    > > they do with my dhcp , so I wonder if there is any parameter such as
    > > ip helper-address for dhcp, that should be configured to make dns work
    > > in different connected networks.

    >
    > No. There isn't. See (1) below.
    >
    > Walter Roberson provided a relevant response only moments ago in an
    > unrelated thread. Your posting exemplifies what he is talking about.
    >
    > From: (Walter Roberson)
    > Message-ID: <Sopwh.836941$1T2.270116@pd7urf2no>
    >
    > [...]
    > Shahin,
    >
    > The great majority of questions that are posted here are not
    > precise enough to determine what the user is -really- observing,
    > or to determine what the user -really- wants to do. What the
    > user -really- wants to do is often different than what the user -asks-
    > to do.
    >
    > When the people who *volunteer* their time to answer questions
    > encounter an ambiguous question, or a situation that strongly
    > suggests to them that the user is taking the wrong approach, they
    > have several options on how to proceed:
    >
    > 1) answer the question that was actually posted and only that question.
    > The most common answer would likely be, "You can't do that.", because
    > people often make mistakes in their postings;
    >
    > 2) point out some ambiguities in the question or situation and ask the
    > poster to clarify what they want;
    >
    > 3) list several meanings that the poster -might- have intended, and
    > provide answers for each of the -possible- meanings; this can take
    > literally hours to write up, whereas just asking the poster to clarify
    > might take only a few minutes;
    >
    > 4) Use intuition, experience, and creative mind-reading to decide
    > what the poster -really- needs, and answer that;
    >
    > 5) decide that it isn't worth the time of the answerer to try to
    > go back and forth with the poster to figure out what the real situation
    > is, and so simply not answer at all.
    >
    > I have been around enough and have answered enough technical questions
    > (20,000 or so), that I have developed a relatively good sense of when
    > posted questions are not the right ones for the situation. I find,
    > though, that I no longer have time to answer all the -possible-
    > meanings, so more and more I am pointing out different possible
    > meanings and asking for clarification.
     
    Sako, Feb 1, 2007
    #3
  4. DNS works independently from DHCP. You *may* get DNS server address through
    DHCP, but it may be configure it manually.

    1. Try to check on your PC, what DNS server is provided by your DHCP server
    (if it is) or configured manually. Make sure it's the same IP address you
    MUST have (there could be typo or old info in your DHCP server).

    ipconfig /all

    2. Try to ping the DNS server. In most cases you should be able to do this,
    but not necessary.

    3. Try to check DNS server through "nslookup" utility:

    nslookup www.google.com <DNS server IP address>

    4. If you cannot ping the IP address or cannot check through "nslookup",
    check if you have correct routing on your Internet router, contact your ISP
    or who supports DNS server, etc.

    Good luck,

    Mike
    ------
    Cisco IP Phone Headset Adapters
    www.ciscoheadsetadapter.com


    "Sako" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi gents, my domain machines don't work correctly with my dns, but
    > they do with my dhcp , so I wonder if there is any parameter such as
    > ip helper-address for dhcp, that should be configured to make dns work
    > in different connected networks.
    >
    > Thanks in advance .
    >
     
    headsetadapter.com, Feb 1, 2007
    #4
  5. Sako

    Sako Guest

    Thanks but if it is a windows issue, we are working on it.
    What worried me more was a config error in the ciscos.

    Thanks.

    On 2 feb, 00:45, "headsetadapter.com" <> wrote:
    > DNS works independently from DHCP. You *may* get DNS server address through
    > DHCP, but it may be configure it manually.
    >
    > 1. Try to check on your PC, what DNS server is provided by your DHCP server
    > (if it is) or configured manually. Make sure it's the same IP address you
    > MUST have (there could be typo or old info in your DHCP server).
    >
    > ipconfig /all
    >
    > 2. Try to ping the DNS server. In most cases you should be able to do this,
    > but not necessary.
    >
    > 3. Try to check DNS server through "nslookup" utility:
    >
    > nslookupwww.google.com<DNS server IP address>
    >
    > 4. If you cannot ping the IP address or cannot check through "nslookup",
    > check if you have correct routing on your Internet router, contact your ISP
    > or who supports DNS server, etc.
    >
    > Good luck,
    >
    > Mike
    > ------
    > Cisco IP Phone Headset Adapterswww.ciscoheadsetadapter.com
    >
    > "Sako" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > > Hi gents, my domain machines don't work correctly with my dns, but
    > > they do with my dhcp , so I wonder if there is any parameter such as
    > > ip helper-address for dhcp, that should be configured to make dns work
    > > in different connected networks.

    >
    > > Thanks in advance .- Ocultar texto de la cita -

    >
    > - Mostrar texto de la cita -
     
    Sako, Feb 2, 2007
    #5
  6. Sako

    Thrill5 Guest

    That wouldn't be a windows issue, it would be a dhcp issue.

    Scott
    "Sako" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks but if it is a windows issue, we are working on it.
    > What worried me more was a config error in the ciscos.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > On 2 feb, 00:45, "headsetadapter.com" <> wrote:
    >> DNS works independently from DHCP. You *may* get DNS server address
    >> through
    >> DHCP, but it may be configure it manually.
    >>
    >> 1. Try to check on your PC, what DNS server is provided by your DHCP
    >> server
    >> (if it is) or configured manually. Make sure it's the same IP address you
    >> MUST have (there could be typo or old info in your DHCP server).
    >>
    >> ipconfig /all
    >>
    >> 2. Try to ping the DNS server. In most cases you should be able to do
    >> this,
    >> but not necessary.
    >>
    >> 3. Try to check DNS server through "nslookup" utility:
    >>
    >> nslookupwww.google.com<DNS server IP address>
    >>
    >> 4. If you cannot ping the IP address or cannot check through "nslookup",
    >> check if you have correct routing on your Internet router, contact your
    >> ISP
    >> or who supports DNS server, etc.
    >>
    >> Good luck,
    >>
    >> Mike
    >> ------
    >> Cisco IP Phone Headset Adapterswww.ciscoheadsetadapter.com
    >>
    >> "Sako" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > Hi gents, my domain machines don't work correctly with my dns, but
    >> > they do with my dhcp , so I wonder if there is any parameter such as
    >> > ip helper-address for dhcp, that should be configured to make dns work
    >> > in different connected networks.

    >>
    >> > Thanks in advance .- Ocultar texto de la cita -

    >>
    >> - Mostrar texto de la cita -

    >
    >
     
    Thrill5, Feb 6, 2007
    #6
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