DivX from Home Video?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by xlo, Mar 3, 2005.

  1. xlo

    xlo Guest

    I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old videos
    are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them before any
    more time passes. I can get it working - but video quality is a bit
    less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to experiment, and I
    wondered if anyone had done this, then they might be able to offer me a
    few tips. Googling leads me to total confusion on this subject - I
    probably don't know the question well enough.

    Using composite video output from the video player.
    Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are PAL
    - I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N? Does it
    matter? Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead PAL and NTSC drivers as
    the video player does both - and I do have a couple of NTSC videos that
    I might want to encode. The video player states PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43.
    On the other hand it also states NTSC playback on PAL TV - but I could
    only ever get NTSC videos to play back on certain (Sony) TVs.
    (Ulead help offers the useful <g> tip - "Click to display the Properties
    dialog box where you can customize the settings you chose in the
    Property Type" - and then provides no further information).
    I am using default 640 x 480 resolution - is there any point using
    higher ( or different)?
    I lose a bit encoding the resulting mpeg to DivX, but my main problem
    seems to be getting good quality mpegs to begin with. Is there perhaps
    some way to encode DivX from AVIs?
    The best video quality (seems as good as the original) that I can seem
    to get is in *.wmv format using Windows Movie Maker at 640x480 high
    quality default settings - but files are kind of big compared to DivX.
    That also seems to be the easiest option to use. Should I just put up
    with the file size and proprietary format, and stick with that? It is
    certainly the simplest option that I have found.



    Thanks.
    xlo, Mar 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. xlo

    cowboyz Guest

    xlo wrote:
    > I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old videos
    > are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them before
    > any more time passes. I can get it working - but video quality is a
    > bit less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to experiment,
    > and I wondered if anyone had done this, then they might be able to
    > offer me a few tips. Googling leads me to total confusion on this
    > subject - I probably don't know the question well enough.
    >
    > Using composite video output from the video player.


    To start with - before you get too disappointed repeat this five time..

    "You can't get better than the source"
    "You can't get better than the source"
    "You can't get better than the source"
    "You can't get better than the source"
    "You can't get better than the source"

    That being said there are a few things you can do.....

    > Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are
    > PAL - I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N? Does it
    > matter?

    Not a whole lot but NZ uses PAL B.

    > Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead PAL and NTSC
    > drivers as the video player does both - and I do have a couple of
    > NTSC videos that I might want to encode. The video player states PAL
    > B/G - NTSC 4.43. On the other hand it also states NTSC playback on
    > PAL TV - but I could only ever get NTSC videos to play back on
    > certain (Sony) TVs. (Ulead help offers the useful <g> tip - "Click to
    > display the Properties dialog box where you can customize the
    > settings you chose in the Property Type" - and then provides no
    > further information). I am using default 640 x 480 resolution - is there
    > any point using
    > higher ( or different)?


    That should be good. If you can select 720x576. I always used this as ti
    makes it easier to keep a proper aspect ratio.

    > I lose a bit encoding the resulting mpeg to DivX, but my main problem
    > seems to be getting good quality mpegs to begin with. Is there
    > perhaps some way to encode DivX from AVIs?


    Plenty of ways to convert avi to divx but avi's are BIG. really really
    big. a gig a minute is not uncommon.

    > The best video quality (seems as good as the original) that I can seem
    > to get is in *.wmv format using Windows Movie Maker at 640x480 high
    > quality default settings - but files are kind of big compared to DivX.
    > That also seems to be the easiest option to use. Should I just put up
    > with the file size and proprietary format, and stick with that? It is
    > certainly the simplest option that I have found.


    I always captured to mpeg to save space and put up with the quality loss.
    If you capture supports it you can capture using the "huffy" codec which is
    very very good for quality.

    Takes a bit to get it right but persistance is your friend.

    >
    >
    > Thanks.
    cowboyz, Mar 3, 2005
    #2
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  3. xlo

    Curly Guest

    xlo <> wrote in
    news:1109887241.538979@ftpsrv1:

    > Using composite video output from the video player.
    > Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These
    > are PAL - I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M,
    > or N? Does it matter?


    http://www.alkenmrs.com/video/wwsnr.html
    New Zealand is PAL B/G
    Choose either B or G, it should not matter (not sure what the
    difference is)
    (Other PAL standards (PAL I for example) have the sound at a
    different frequencies.)

    http://encyclopedia.laborlawtalk.com/PAL


    > Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead
    > PAL and NTSC drivers as the video player does both - and I do
    > have a couple of NTSC videos that I might want to encode. The
    > video player states PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43. On the other hand it
    > also states NTSC playback on PAL TV - but I could only ever get
    > NTSC videos to play back on certain (Sony) TVs.


    I understand NTSC playback on PAL TVs is "PAL 60Hz": PAL formatting
    of colour information, but sent at 60 frames per second, so some TVs
    are OK with this and some are not (usually at 50Hz for PAL).

    > (Ulead help
    > offers the useful <g> tip - "Click to display the Properties
    > dialog box where you can customize the settings you chose in the
    > Property Type" - and then provides no further information).
    > I am using default 640 x 480 resolution - is there any point
    > using higher ( or different)?


    http://www.videohelp.com/glossary?all#NTSC
    <<...an NTSC full D1 DVD is 704 or 720 x 480.>>

    http://www.videohelp.com/glossary?all#PAL
    <<...a PAL full D1 DVD is 704 or 720 x 576.>>

    In other words, NTSC has 480 visible scan lines (out of 525), and PAL
    has 576 visible scan lines (out of 625). The ULead default of
    640x480 gives a 4:3 aspect ration, and uses an NTSC compatible of 480
    visible scan lines.
    You may want to try 768x576 which gives a 4:3 aspect ratio and a PAL
    compatible 576 visible lines? OR not... VHS can't actually record
    more than an effective 240 horizontal "lines", so 768 is over the
    top. I know my (DivX compatible) DVD player would barf if I gave it
    a 768 wide AVI file, so perhaps 640x480 is the best...
    (Warning! I'm talking bollocks!)

    http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:zojKzFerci4J:www.divx-
    digest.com/articles/vhs_capture.html+vhs+resolution&hl=en

    > I lose a bit encoding the resulting mpeg to DivX, but my main
    > problem seems to be getting good quality mpegs to begin with.
    > Is there perhaps some way to encode DivX from AVIs?


    VirtualDub can read AVIs and create DivX AVIs (?)
    (But you must know that already, are you asking if there is some
    "shortcut"/"high quality" way to create a DivX AVI? - I don't know)

    > The best video quality (seems as good as the original) that I
    > can seem to get is in *.wmv format using Windows Movie Maker at
    > 640x480 high quality default settings - but files are kind of
    > big compared to DivX.


    Could you not just set the DivX bit rate higher, or use DivX with a
    quantizer instead of a bit rate (I'm on shaky ground here sorry, but
    I believe you can create DivX using as many bit as needed to capture
    the detail, rather than forcing it to a specific bit rate.)

    > That also seems to be the easiest option
    > to use. Should I just put up with the file size and proprietary
    > format, and stick with that? It is certainly the simplest
    > option that I have found.


    Could you encode to MPEG-2?
    That would be non-proprietory, and should be good quality (?)
    (Would need to find an MPEG2 codec)

    Curly
    Curly, Mar 3, 2005
    #3
  4. xlo

    xlo Guest

    Curly wrote:
    > xlo <> wrote in
    > news:1109887241.538979@ftpsrv1:
    >
    >
    >>Using composite video output from the video player.
    >>Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These
    >>are PAL - I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M,
    >>or N? Does it matter?

    >
    >
    > http://www.alkenmrs.com/video/wwsnr.html
    > New Zealand is PAL B/G
    > Choose either B or G, it should not matter (not sure what the
    > difference is)
    > (Other PAL standards (PAL I for example) have the sound at a
    > different frequencies.)
    >
    > http://encyclopedia.laborlawtalk.com/PAL
    >

    Okay thanks - I guess the sound frequency offset isn't important for
    what I'm doing - that will be on the RF output from the video - not
    composite video and audio. As I'm using Audio out to soundcard, it's a
    red herring - probably of interest if someone is using a TV card to get
    video to their PC. Will set to PAL B/G and give it a try.

    >
    >
    >>Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead
    >>PAL and NTSC drivers as the video player does both - and I do
    >>have a couple of NTSC videos that I might want to encode. The
    >>video player states PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43. On the other hand it
    >>also states NTSC playback on PAL TV - but I could only ever get
    >>NTSC videos to play back on certain (Sony) TVs.

    >
    >
    > I understand NTSC playback on PAL TVs is "PAL 60Hz": PAL formatting
    > of colour information, but sent at 60 frames per second, so some TVs
    > are OK with this and some are not (usually at 50Hz for PAL).
    >

    Aha - that makes sense - I have lent this video player to people that
    wanted to watch NTSC videos - and most of the time have had to lend them
    one of my Sony TVs as well.
    >
    >>(Ulead help
    >>offers the useful <g> tip - "Click to display the Properties
    >>dialog box where you can customize the settings you chose in the
    >>Property Type" - and then provides no further information).
    >>I am using default 640 x 480 resolution - is there any point
    >>using higher ( or different)?

    >
    >
    > http://www.videohelp.com/glossary?all#NTSC
    > <<...an NTSC full D1 DVD is 704 or 720 x 480.>>
    >
    > http://www.videohelp.com/glossary?all#PAL
    > <<...a PAL full D1 DVD is 704 or 720 x 576.>>
    >
    > In other words, NTSC has 480 visible scan lines (out of 525), and PAL
    > has 576 visible scan lines (out of 625). The ULead default of
    > 640x480 gives a 4:3 aspect ration, and uses an NTSC compatible of 480
    > visible scan lines.
    > You may want to try 768x576 which gives a 4:3 aspect ratio and a PAL
    > compatible 576 visible lines? OR not... VHS can't actually record
    > more than an effective 240 horizontal "lines", so 768 is over the
    > top. I know my (DivX compatible) DVD player would barf if I gave it
    > a 768 wide AVI file, so perhaps 640x480 is the best...
    > (Warning! I'm talking bollocks!)
    >
    > http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:zojKzFerci4J:www.divx-
    > digest.com/articles/vhs_capture.html+vhs+resolution&hl=en
    >
    >
    >>I lose a bit encoding the resulting mpeg to DivX, but my main
    >>problem seems to be getting good quality mpegs to begin with.
    >>Is there perhaps some way to encode DivX from AVIs?

    >
    >
    > VirtualDub can read AVIs and create DivX AVIs (?)
    > (But you must know that already, are you asking if there is some
    > "shortcut"/"high quality" way to create a DivX AVI? - I don't know)
    >

    It would be a handy thing IMO.
    >
    >>The best video quality (seems as good as the original) that I
    >>can seem to get is in *.wmv format using Windows Movie Maker at
    >>640x480 high quality default settings - but files are kind of
    >>big compared to DivX.

    >
    >
    > Could you not just set the DivX bit rate higher, or use DivX with a
    > quantizer instead of a bit rate (I'm on shaky ground here sorry, but
    > I believe you can create DivX using as many bit as needed to capture
    > the detail, rather than forcing it to a specific bit rate.)
    >
    >
    >>That also seems to be the easiest option
    >>to use. Should I just put up with the file size and proprietary
    >>format, and stick with that? It is certainly the simplest
    >>option that I have found.

    >
    >
    > Could you encode to MPEG-2?
    > That would be non-proprietory, and should be good quality (?)
    > (Would need to find an MPEG2 codec)
    >



    I am ouputting Mpeg2 from Video Studio. Can now get an acceptable
    result by tweaking bitrate. I think my main problem was default bitrate
    setting for that. No surprise that increasing it gave me a big
    improvement. Mpeg2 is giving me about 40 mb / minute. Encoded same to
    DivX is using 6.6 mb / minute. With *.wmv at 640 x 480 high quality,
    I'm getting almost exactly 10mb / minute. Over an hour on a CD isn't
    bad IMO - quality is good, and (best part) it's easy to do. So far, I'm
    geting a better result from Windows Movie Maker than DivX. Looks like
    I'll have to keep tweaking if I want to improve the result with DivX -
    which I would like to do.
    xlo, Mar 4, 2005
    #4
  5. xlo

    xlo Guest

    cowboyz wrote:

    > xlo wrote:
    >
    >>I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old videos
    >>are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them before
    >>any more time passes. I can get it working - but video quality is a
    >>bit less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to experiment,
    >>and I wondered if anyone had done this, then they might be able to
    >>offer me a few tips. Googling leads me to total confusion on this
    >>subject - I probably don't know the question well enough.
    >>
    >>Using composite video output from the video player.

    >
    >
    > To start with - before you get too disappointed repeat this five time..
    >
    > "You can't get better than the source"
    > "You can't get better than the source"
    > "You can't get better than the source"
    > "You can't get better than the source"
    > "You can't get better than the source"
    >
    > That being said there are a few things you can do.....
    >
    >
    >>Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are
    >>PAL - I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N? Does it
    >>matter?

    >
    > Not a whole lot but NZ uses PAL B.
    >
    >
    >>Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead PAL and NTSC
    >>drivers as the video player does both - and I do have a couple of
    >>NTSC videos that I might want to encode. The video player states PAL
    >>B/G - NTSC 4.43. On the other hand it also states NTSC playback on
    >>PAL TV - but I could only ever get NTSC videos to play back on
    >>certain (Sony) TVs. (Ulead help offers the useful <g> tip - "Click to
    >>display the Properties dialog box where you can customize the
    >>settings you chose in the Property Type" - and then provides no
    >>further information). I am using default 640 x 480 resolution - is there
    >>any point using
    >>higher ( or different)?

    >
    >
    > That should be good. If you can select 720x576. I always used this as ti
    > makes it easier to keep a proper aspect ratio.
    >
    >
    >>I lose a bit encoding the resulting mpeg to DivX, but my main problem
    >>seems to be getting good quality mpegs to begin with. Is there
    >>perhaps some way to encode DivX from AVIs?

    >
    >
    > Plenty of ways to convert avi to divx but avi's are BIG. really really
    > big. a gig a minute is not uncommon.
    >
    >
    >>The best video quality (seems as good as the original) that I can seem
    >>to get is in *.wmv format using Windows Movie Maker at 640x480 high
    >>quality default settings - but files are kind of big compared to DivX.
    >>That also seems to be the easiest option to use. Should I just put up
    >>with the file size and proprietary format, and stick with that? It is
    >>certainly the simplest option that I have found.

    >
    >
    > I always captured to mpeg to save space and put up with the quality loss.
    > If you capture supports it you can capture using the "huffy" codec which is
    > very very good for quality.
    >
    > Takes a bit to get it right but persistance is your friend.
    >
    >

    Thanks for that. Yep - I realise that you can't make a silk purse from
    a sow's ear. I think that my best way is to get the Mpeg as good as I
    can. I don't think I have "huffy" codec - I'll look into it.
    The bitrate settings that I was using were way too low. The file size
    of the MPEG doesn't really matter, as it's effectively only a temporary
    copy from which to encode a DivX - so not a lot to lose by increasing
    it. Then I have better raw material to work with from the start.
    To MS's credit - Movie Maker seems to do a very effective job with their
    *.wmv format.
    xlo, Mar 4, 2005
    #5
  6. On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 11:01:01 +1300, xlo <>
    wrote:

    >I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old videos
    >are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them before any
    >more time passes. I can get it working - but video quality is a bit
    >less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to experiment, and I
    >wondered if anyone had done this, then they might be able to offer me a
    >few tips. Googling leads me to total confusion on this subject - I
    >probably don't know the question well enough.
    >
    >Using composite video output from the video player.


    Here is the start of your problems. To get everything that is on a
    VHS tape, it is best to use an S-VHS video for capturing the data to
    disk. That way you will have a realistic chance of getting all the
    quality that exists on the tape. VHS videos are built very much to a
    price these days, and they limit the bandwidth to VHS only, and often
    to less than what the VHS specification actually allows for. You need
    some headroom above the VHS signal to be able to capture it fully, and
    an S-VHS video gives you that, plus they are still built to a better
    quality standard (and cost much more too of course).

    >Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are PAL
    >- I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N? Does it
    >matter? Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead PAL and NTSC drivers as
    >the video player does both - and I do have a couple of NTSC videos that
    >I might want to encode. The video player states PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43.
    >On the other hand it also states NTSC playback on PAL TV - but I could
    >only ever get NTSC videos to play back on certain (Sony) TVs.


    NZ is definitely not PAL B, so try PAL G - that sounds right, but it
    is ages since I set my system up and I am having trouble remembering
    exaxtly.

    >(Ulead help offers the useful <g> tip - "Click to display the Properties
    >dialog box where you can customize the settings you chose in the
    >Property Type" - and then provides no further information).
    >I am using default 640 x 480 resolution - is there any point using
    >higher ( or different)?


    If you are converting to DivX, then you want the most data you can get
    out of the capture process, so that the least information is lost.
    The very best way of doing this is to capture to a completely
    uncompressed AVI format, or lossless Huffy compressed AVI format. You
    can only do this though, if you have a monster size hard disk - IIRC,
    Huffy compressed capture takes 1 Gibyte per minute, and completely
    uncompressed takes at least another 30%. If you want to do this, the
    tool to use is VirtualDub or VirtualDubMod:

    VirtualDub:
    http://www.virtualdub.org

    VirtualDubMod:
    http://virtualdubmod.sf.net

    However, depending on the capture card you are using, VDub(Mod) may or
    may not be able to talk to it properly. You will need to Google to
    find the Huffy codec - I can not remember where I got mine from. If
    you can not find it, let me know and I can put my copy on my web site.

    If you can not do an uncompressed AVI capture, probably the next best
    option will be to capture to a high bit rate CBR (= constant bit
    rate) DVD MPEG-2 format. Most capture cards can do this, using the
    software provided with them (or Ulead). You want to capture at the
    highest bit rate you can, and use "Full D1" DVD format, which is
    720x576 for PAL and 720x480 for NTSC. The resulting files would then
    be burnable directly to DVD if you want to do that, or you could then
    use VDub(Mod) to convert to DivX.

    See this for the standard DVD formats:
    http://www.videohelp.com/dvd

    >I lose a bit encoding the resulting mpeg to DivX, but my main problem
    >seems to be getting good quality mpegs to begin with. Is there perhaps
    >some way to encode DivX from AVIs?


    Yes, to encode DivX from AVIs you use VirtualDub(Mod). To get the
    best result, you need to do a 2 pass conversion, where the first pass
    works out what bit rate is needed for each frame and the second pass
    does the actual conversion. Here are a set of instructions on how to
    do it that I keep stashed away for posting:

    =============================================
    Load your source AVI/MPEG/VOB file into VirtualDubMod (not VirtualDub
    - it does not load VOB files). Select "Video/Full processing mode".
    Select your codec: "Video/Compression" and select a DivX 5.2 codec.
    Make sure the FOURCC code on the right says "divx" not "yv12". Click
    on "Configure" and the "DivX Codec Properties" window should pop up.
    Set up the settings you want - I use a bit rate of 1150 kbits/s, so
    the file sizes wind up similar to those of a VCD conversion from the
    same source, and the "Slow" Encode Performance, for best quality and
    compression. The "Video" tab has resize and crop options if you want
    them, or you can use the VirtualDubMod filters to do the same job. I
    suspect it is probably better to use the ones in the DivX codec, as
    they will probably be computed together with the DivX conversion,
    instead of being calculated as a separate code layer. On the
    "General" tab, set the "Variable bit rate mode" to "Multipass, 1st
    pass". Make sure the log file is being stored in a sensible place
    with enough free space. Click OK to close the codec window. Click OK
    to close the "Select video compression" window. Optionally, set the
    mark in and mark out points for the scene you want to process (do not
    do this if you want to process the entire VOB file at once). Do
    "File/Save as". Make sure the "Save as type" is set to AVI. Tick the
    "Don't run this job now" option. Select your output file name and
    click SAVE. This will store a batch job for the first processing
    pass. Do "Video/Compression/Configure" again, and change the
    "Variable bit rate mode" setting to "Multipass, nth pass". Do not
    change any other settings at all! Do "File/Save as" again, giving the
    same output file name. This will store a batch job for the second
    processing pass. If you are processing scenes individually, repeat
    the above for each scene you are creating. Finally, do "File/Job
    control..." and click "Start". Your batch jobs will now run (for
    several hours).

    As of the DivX 5.2 codec, the codec will pop up a window asking if it
    is OK to overwrite its log file. This stops batch processing until
    you answer the question. To prevent this, when setting up the first
    pass settings for the DivX codec, change the log file name to one that
    is unique for that scene, and on the second ("Nth") pass settings,
    turn off the "Update log file" option.
    =============================================

    Note that you need the DivX Pro codec or DrDivX (which comes with DivX
    Pro) in order to not get a DivX logo on your files.

    If you want to experiment with the settings for the DivX codec, select
    a representative part of your file as a test scene (make sure you
    include some fast movement), and try just converting that small
    section with various parameters. I have found that I prefer to use
    1150 kibits/s for most of my DivX files. If the source is a DVD, this
    will capture most of the quality of the DVD in a reasonable file size.
    Going much above 1600 kibts/s seems to be a waste of bits even for DVD
    quality source material, and you may well find that you can go
    considerably below 1150 for VHS source material. The 1150 kibits/s
    rate gives files about the same size as VCD (10 Mibytes per minute).

    >The best video quality (seems as good as the original) that I can seem
    >to get is in *.wmv format using Windows Movie Maker at 640x480 high
    >quality default settings - but files are kind of big compared to DivX.
    >That also seems to be the easiest option to use. Should I just put up
    >with the file size and proprietary format, and stick with that? It is
    >certainly the simplest option that I have found.


    The WMV format you are converting to there is almost certainly
    Microsoft's near MPEG-4 format. This is, unfortunatly, not fully
    compatible with the MPEG-4 standard, as it was done from an older
    draft of the MPEG-4 standard and things changed between then and when
    the standard was adopted. As a result, most of the new MPEG-4 capable
    DVD players do not seem to be able to play these WMV files, whereas
    they can directly play DivX and Xvid files. As well, WMV files are a
    security hazard, as they are able to phone home and do other Internet
    access and hence can be a target for viruses. Microsoft does not
    allow use of its WMV format without paying them for a licence either,
    so a lot of good software (especially freeware such as VirtualDub)
    does not handle WMV files. So I think it is best to avoid WMV files
    if at all possible. However, that WMV format does produce just about
    the same quality as other MPEG-4 formats such as DivX and Xvid for the
    same number of bits.

    >Thanks.
    Stephen Worthington, Mar 4, 2005
    #6
  7. xlo

    cowboyz Guest

    Stephen Worthington wrote:
    > On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 11:01:01 +1300, xlo <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old
    >> videos are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them
    >> before any more time passes. I can get it working - but video
    >> quality is a bit less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to
    >> experiment, and I wondered if anyone had done this, then they might
    >> be able to offer me a few tips. Googling leads me to total
    >> confusion on this subject - I probably don't know the question well
    >> enough.
    >>
    >> Using composite video output from the video player.

    >
    > Here is the start of your problems. To get everything that is on a
    > VHS tape, it is best to use an S-VHS video for capturing the data to
    > disk. That way you will have a realistic chance of getting all the
    > quality that exists on the tape. VHS videos are built very much to a
    > price these days, and they limit the bandwidth to VHS only, and often
    > to less than what the VHS specification actually allows for. You need
    > some headroom above the VHS signal to be able to capture it fully, and
    > an S-VHS video gives you that, plus they are still built to a better
    > quality standard (and cost much more too of course).
    >
    >> Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are
    >> PAL - I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N?
    >> Does it matter? Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead PAL and NTSC
    >> drivers as the video player does both - and I do have a couple of
    >> NTSC videos that I might want to encode. The video player states
    >> PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43. On the other hand it also states NTSC playback
    >> on PAL TV - but I could only ever get NTSC videos to play back on
    >> certain (Sony) TVs.

    >
    > NZ is definitely not PAL B, so try PAL G -



    huh? Is too.
    cowboyz, Mar 4, 2005
    #7
  8. xlo

    xlo Guest

    Stephen Worthington wrote:
    > On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 11:01:01 +1300, xlo <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old videos
    >>are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them before any
    >>more time passes. I can get it working - but video quality is a bit
    >>less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to experiment, and I
    >>wondered if anyone had done this, then they might be able to offer me a
    >>few tips. Googling leads me to total confusion on this subject - I
    >>probably don't know the question well enough.
    >>
    >>Using composite video output from the video player.

    >
    >
    > Here is the start of your problems. To get everything that is on a
    > VHS tape, it is best to use an S-VHS video for capturing the data to
    > disk. That way you will have a realistic chance of getting all the
    > quality that exists on the tape. VHS videos are built very much to a
    > price these days, and they limit the bandwidth to VHS only, and often
    > to less than what the VHS specification actually allows for. You need
    > some headroom above the VHS signal to be able to capture it fully, and
    > an S-VHS video gives you that, plus they are still built to a better
    > quality standard (and cost much more too of course).
    >

    Okay. I can put up with the quality of the composite video source. I do
    have one video on one of those huge Betamax tapes - and I might have to
    hire a machine to do that.

    >
    >>Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are PAL
    >>- I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N? Does it
    >>matter? Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead PAL and NTSC drivers as
    >>the video player does both - and I do have a couple of NTSC videos that
    >>I might want to encode. The video player states PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43.
    >>On the other hand it also states NTSC playback on PAL TV - but I could
    >>only ever get NTSC videos to play back on certain (Sony) TVs.

    >
    >
    > NZ is definitely not PAL B, so try PAL G - that sounds right, but it
    > is ages since I set my system up and I am having trouble remembering
    > exaxtly.


    If the difference is just the audio frequency offset - then it doesn't
    matter for me anyway.
    >
    >
    >>(Ulead help offers the useful <g> tip - "Click to display the Properties
    >>dialog box where you can customize the settings you chose in the
    >>Property Type" - and then provides no further information).
    >>I am using default 640 x 480 resolution - is there any point using
    >>higher ( or different)?

    >
    >
    > If you are converting to DivX, then you want the most data you can get
    > out of the capture process, so that the least information is lost.
    > The very best way of doing this is to capture to a completely
    > uncompressed AVI format, or lossless Huffy compressed AVI format. You
    > can only do this though, if you have a monster size hard disk - IIRC,
    > Huffy compressed capture takes 1 Gibyte per minute, and completely
    > uncompressed takes at least another 30%. If you want to do this, the
    > tool to use is VirtualDub or VirtualDubMod:
    >
    > VirtualDub:
    > http://www.virtualdub.org
    >
    > VirtualDubMod:
    > http://virtualdubmod.sf.net
    >

    1 gb / minute isn't going to work for me - without a trip to my local
    hard drive supplier. Back to mpeg...

    >
    > However, depending on the capture card you are using, VDub(Mod) may or
    > may not be able to talk to it properly. You will need to Google to
    > find the Huffy codec - I can not remember where I got mine from. If
    > you can not find it, let me know and I can put my copy on my web site.
    >
    > If you can not do an uncompressed AVI capture, probably the next best
    > option will be to capture to a high bit rate CBR (= constant bit
    > rate) DVD MPEG-2 format. Most capture cards can do this, using the
    > software provided with them (or Ulead). You want to capture at the
    > highest bit rate you can, and use "Full D1" DVD format, which is
    > 720x576 for PAL and 720x480 for NTSC. The resulting files would then
    > be burnable directly to DVD if you want to do that, or you could then
    > use VDub(Mod) to convert to DivX.
    >

    Okay - I later got a reasonable result from VBR mpeg at a higher
    setting. I'll try a high bitrate CBR setting, and see how that goes. I
    guess it should be faster too? That file size isn't to much of a worry -
    as I'll delete it once I've encoded the DivX. I was using DvdX to
    convert the mpeg2 to DivX, and was using two pass encoding. (It does a
    very nice job of encoding a DVD to DivX) I'm not sure if the nasty DvdX
    user interface is a design flaw, or a practical result of this not being
    a simple thing to do - lots of options that need to be presented.

    > See this for the standard DVD formats:
    > http://www.videohelp.com/dvd
    >
    >
    >>I lose a bit encoding the resulting mpeg to DivX, but my main problem
    >>seems to be getting good quality mpegs to begin with. Is there perhaps
    >>some way to encode DivX from AVIs?

    >
    >
    > Yes, to encode DivX from AVIs you use VirtualDub(Mod). To get the
    > best result, you need to do a 2 pass conversion, where the first pass
    > works out what bit rate is needed for each frame and the second pass
    > does the actual conversion. Here are a set of instructions on how to
    > do it that I keep stashed away for posting:
    >
    > =============================================
    > Load your source AVI/MPEG/VOB file into VirtualDubMod (not VirtualDub
    > - it does not load VOB files). Select "Video/Full processing mode".
    > Select your codec: "Video/Compression" and select a DivX 5.2 codec.
    > Make sure the FOURCC code on the right says "divx" not "yv12". Click
    > on "Configure" and the "DivX Codec Properties" window should pop up.
    > Set up the settings you want - I use a bit rate of 1150 kbits/s, so
    > the file sizes wind up similar to those of a VCD conversion from the
    > same source, and the "Slow" Encode Performance, for best quality and
    > compression. The "Video" tab has resize and crop options if you want
    > them, or you can use the VirtualDubMod filters to do the same job. I
    > suspect it is probably better to use the ones in the DivX codec, as
    > they will probably be computed together with the DivX conversion,
    > instead of being calculated as a separate code layer. On the
    > "General" tab, set the "Variable bit rate mode" to "Multipass, 1st
    > pass". Make sure the log file is being stored in a sensible place
    > with enough free space. Click OK to close the codec window. Click OK
    > to close the "Select video compression" window. Optionally, set the
    > mark in and mark out points for the scene you want to process (do not
    > do this if you want to process the entire VOB file at once). Do
    > "File/Save as". Make sure the "Save as type" is set to AVI. Tick the
    > "Don't run this job now" option. Select your output file name and
    > click SAVE. This will store a batch job for the first processing
    > pass. Do "Video/Compression/Configure" again, and change the
    > "Variable bit rate mode" setting to "Multipass, nth pass". Do not
    > change any other settings at all! Do "File/Save as" again, giving the
    > same output file name. This will store a batch job for the second
    > processing pass. If you are processing scenes individually, repeat
    > the above for each scene you are creating. Finally, do "File/Job
    > control..." and click "Start". Your batch jobs will now run (for
    > several hours).
    >
    > As of the DivX 5.2 codec, the codec will pop up a window asking if it
    > is OK to overwrite its log file. This stops batch processing until
    > you answer the question. To prevent this, when setting up the first
    > pass settings for the DivX codec, change the log file name to one that
    > is unique for that scene, and on the second ("Nth") pass settings,
    > turn off the "Update log file" option.
    > =============================================
    >
    > Note that you need the DivX Pro codec or DrDivX (which comes with DivX
    > Pro) in order to not get a DivX logo on your files.
    >

    Weird, but my divX 5.2 pro trial occasionally tells me that I only have
    a few days left, but it never seems to expire. I still have the bitrate
    calculator and no logo. I'm tempting fate by mentioning this - not that
    I'm superstitious...
    >
    > If you want to experiment with the settings for the DivX codec, select
    > a representative part of your file as a test scene (make sure you
    > include some fast movement), and try just converting that small
    > section with various parameters. I have found that I prefer to use
    > 1150 kibits/s for most of my DivX files. If the source is a DVD, this
    > will capture most of the quality of the DVD in a reasonable file size.
    > Going much above 1600 kibts/s seems to be a waste of bits even for DVD
    > quality source material, and you may well find that you can go
    > considerably below 1150 for VHS source material. The 1150 kibits/s
    > rate gives files about the same size as VCD (10 Mibytes per minute).
    >
    >
    >>The best video quality (seems as good as the original) that I can seem
    >>to get is in *.wmv format using Windows Movie Maker at 640x480 high
    >>quality default settings - but files are kind of big compared to DivX.
    >>That also seems to be the easiest option to use. Should I just put up
    >>with the file size and proprietary format, and stick with that? It is
    >>certainly the simplest option that I have found.

    >
    >
    > The WMV format you are converting to there is almost certainly
    > Microsoft's near MPEG-4 format. This is, unfortunatly, not fully
    > compatible with the MPEG-4 standard, as it was done from an older
    > draft of the MPEG-4 standard and things changed between then and when
    > the standard was adopted. As a result, most of the new MPEG-4 capable
    > DVD players do not seem to be able to play these WMV files, whereas
    > they can directly play DivX and Xvid files. As well, WMV files are a
    > security hazard, as they are able to phone home and do other Internet
    > access and hence can be a target for viruses. Microsoft does not
    > allow use of its WMV format without paying them for a licence either,
    > so a lot of good software (especially freeware such as VirtualDub)
    > does not handle WMV files. So I think it is best to avoid WMV files
    > if at all possible. However, that WMV format does produce just about
    > the same quality as other MPEG-4 formats such as DivX and Xvid for the
    > same number of bits.
    >

    Given the relative ease of using Windows Movie Maker to encode a good
    quality *wmv, and the relative difficulty of encoding in DivX format,
    then if something else free/low cost and easy to use doesn't appear, I
    guess MS will take the market by default.
    xlo, Mar 4, 2005
    #8
  9. xlo

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "cowboyz" <> wrote in message
    news:d084t4$qda$...
    >
    >
    > xlo wrote:
    >> I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old videos
    >> are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them before
    >> any more time passes. I can get it working - but video quality is a
    >> bit less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to experiment,
    >> and I wondered if anyone had done this, then they might be able to
    >> offer me a few tips. Googling leads me to total confusion on this
    >> subject - I probably don't know the question well enough.
    >>
    >> Using composite video output from the video player.

    >
    > To start with - before you get too disappointed repeat this five time..
    >
    > "You can't get better than the source"
    > "You can't get better than the source"
    > "You can't get better than the source"
    > "You can't get better than the source"
    > "You can't get better than the source"


    Yes you can.

    At least I have anyway.
    1 VHS tape Daleks Invasion Earth 2150 AD copied to DivX using VD of course.
    From memory I used the sharpen filter and improved the contrast filter on
    it. Then shoved the file into Power Producer ending up with a VCD that's
    better than the original VHS tape.

    An even better example is the shocking VHS tape of Lord Of The Dance. At
    first I had 3 goes at trying to copy it. about 5 minutes enough each time
    as the colours were shocking. I was sure my settings must've altered very
    badly to look as bad it did with very heavily satuated colours. I was
    making it into 2 SVCDs for a friend who owns the tape. I then plugged the
    S-Video lead from the VCR into the TV to see how the tape actually looks on
    TV. It was satuated to ****, worse tape I've ever seen, nothing wrong with
    the actual condition of it as it's been played bugger all from new. The
    colour satuation is that bad that it affected the quality of the picture for
    sharpness. Plugged the VCR back into the computer knocked the colour
    satuation levels way down from what I usually use. I then tried the VCR on
    TV1, damn near black and white, but when playing Lord Of The Dance the
    colours were damn near spot on. The end result of the SVCDs was much better
    than the piss poor original tape. So never say that you can't improve the
    original source. The Daleks & Dr Who was only a subtle improvement compared
    to the huge improvement of LOTD.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Mar 4, 2005
    #9
  10. xlo

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "cowboyz" <> wrote in message
    news:d08om5$501$...
    >
    >
    > Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >> On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 11:01:01 +1300, xlo <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old
    >>> videos are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them
    >>> before any more time passes. I can get it working - but video
    >>> quality is a bit less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to
    >>> experiment, and I wondered if anyone had done this, then they might
    >>> be able to offer me a few tips. Googling leads me to total
    >>> confusion on this subject - I probably don't know the question well
    >>> enough.
    >>>
    >>> Using composite video output from the video player.

    >>
    >> Here is the start of your problems. To get everything that is on a
    >> VHS tape, it is best to use an S-VHS video for capturing the data to
    >> disk. That way you will have a realistic chance of getting all the
    >> quality that exists on the tape. VHS videos are built very much to a
    >> price these days, and they limit the bandwidth to VHS only, and often
    >> to less than what the VHS specification actually allows for. You need
    >> some headroom above the VHS signal to be able to capture it fully, and
    >> an S-VHS video gives you that, plus they are still built to a better
    >> quality standard (and cost much more too of course).
    >>
    >>> Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are
    >>> PAL - I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N?
    >>> Does it matter? Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead PAL and NTSC
    >>> drivers as the video player does both - and I do have a couple of
    >>> NTSC videos that I might want to encode. The video player states
    >>> PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43. On the other hand it also states NTSC playback
    >>> on PAL TV - but I could only ever get NTSC videos to play back on
    >>> certain (Sony) TVs.

    >>
    >> NZ is definitely not PAL B, so try PAL G -

    >
    >
    > huh? Is too.


    LOL For a minute there I was thinking I was only one that uses PAL B, I've
    also used PAL M as well.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Mar 4, 2005
    #10
  11. xlo

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "xlo" <> wrote in message
    news:1109911025.24991@ftpsrv1...
    > Stephen Worthington wrote:
    >> On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 11:01:01 +1300, xlo <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old videos
    >>>are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them before any
    >>>more time passes. I can get it working - but video quality is a bit less
    >>>than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to experiment, and I wondered
    >>>if anyone had done this, then they might be able to offer me a few tips.
    >>>Googling leads me to total confusion on this subject - I probably don't
    >>>know the question well enough.

    >>

    > Given the relative ease of using Windows Movie Maker to encode a good
    > quality *wmv, and the relative difficulty of encoding in DivX format, then
    > if something else free/low cost and easy to use doesn't appear, I guess MS
    > will take the market by default.


    LOL
    You're having trouble with DivX because you're doing it all wrong. Don't
    give up on trying different settings....
    But never edit bits out with Virtual Dub. You'll only run into sound sync
    problems when converting an edited down DivX file to a VCD or SVCD.

    When you get the DivX compression quality to around 7:1 as long the source
    video is real good quality, DivX will give real good results. The frame
    capture rate makes a big difference. For PAL a rate of 25 frames is just
    fine with hardly any frames dropped. The picture size could make a
    difference to quality and how many frames end up being dropped. Going down
    to smaller size picture will still get you real good results if not better
    than what you have been. Sound compression can make a difference to the
    number of frames that get dropped, which is why I don't usually other with
    sound compression. File size makes very little difference when converting
    to VCD or SVCD.

    Your old family videos may look better after you've captured them to DivX,
    then load the capture file back to VD and use some of the filters on it to
    improve the picture quality - colours - contrast - softness - sharpness are
    some of the useful filters in VD. It won't affect your original capture
    file as you play round with it, just save it to different file name. Power
    Producer does a real good job of converting and burning video files to VCD,
    SVCD, & DVD. Editing takes a bit of getting used to as it's the complete
    opposite to editing down videos with VD, but it doesn't cause sound sync
    problem like editing chunks out with VD does.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Mar 4, 2005
    #11
  12. E. Scrooge wrote:
    > The Daleks & Dr Who was only a subtle improvement compared
    > to the huge improvement of LOTD.


    heh, it wouldn't be hard to improve lord of the dance... it couldn't get
    much worse :)

    --
    Dave.net.nz
    reply addy is e
    nice! http://www.dave.net.nz/images/link.jpg
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Mar 5, 2005
    #12
  13. xlo

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "Dave - Dave.net.nz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > E. Scrooge wrote:
    >> The Daleks & Dr Who was only a subtle improvement compared to the huge
    >> improvement of LOTD.

    >
    > heh, it wouldn't be hard to improve lord of the dance... it couldn't get
    > much worse :)
    >
    > --
    > Dave.net.nz


    Well it's not something that one would want to watch too often. Why the
    producers of the video didn't bother knock back the colour satuation is an
    odd one.
    If you didn't like LOTD, then don't bother with Riverdance which is a long
    drawn out show. At least the video of Riverdance had damn near normal
    colours.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Mar 5, 2005
    #13
  14. E. Scrooge wrote:
    >>>The Daleks & Dr Who was only a subtle improvement compared to the huge
    >>>improvement of LOTD.


    >>heh, it wouldn't be hard to improve lord of the dance... it couldn't get
    >>much worse :)


    > Well it's not something that one would want to watch too often.


    *snip*

    > If you didn't like LOTD, then don't bother with Riverdance which is a long
    > drawn out show.


    Im not too sure, but I may have seen both(on video at parents or
    sisters)... I left after ~5 mins both times, not sure if they were the
    same or not.

    --
    Dave.net.nz
    reply addy is e
    nice! http://www.dave.net.nz/images/link.jpg
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Mar 5, 2005
    #14
  15. On Sat, 5 Mar 2005 00:28:57 +1300, "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz
    (*sling)> wrote:

    >Your old family videos may look better after you've captured them to DivX,
    >then load the capture file back to VD and use some of the filters on it to
    >improve the picture quality - colours - contrast - softness - sharpness are
    >some of the useful filters in VD. It won't affect your original capture
    >file as you play round with it, just save it to different file name. Power
    >Producer does a real good job of converting and burning video files to VCD,
    >SVCD, & DVD. Editing takes a bit of getting used to as it's the complete
    >opposite to editing down videos with VD, but it doesn't cause sound sync
    >problem like editing chunks out with VD does.
    >
    >E. Scrooge


    So you are saying that PowerProducer will edit DivX AVI files? I
    would like something better than VDub for that.
    Stephen Worthington, Mar 5, 2005
    #15
  16. xlo

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "Dave - Dave.net.nz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > E. Scrooge wrote:
    >>>>The Daleks & Dr Who was only a subtle improvement compared to the huge
    >>>>improvement of LOTD.

    >
    >>>heh, it wouldn't be hard to improve lord of the dance... it couldn't get
    >>>much worse :)

    >
    >> Well it's not something that one would want to watch too often.

    >
    > *snip*
    >
    >> If you didn't like LOTD, then don't bother with Riverdance which is a
    >> long drawn out show.

    >
    > Im not too sure, but I may have seen both(on video at parents or
    > sisters)... I left after ~5 mins both times, not sure if they were the
    > same or not.
    >
    > --
    > Dave.net.nz


    The footwork is much the same in both of them. LOTD has a bit of a story,
    but some pretty good amplified violin playing as well.
    If you saw the start of LOTD then you'll know how shocking the colour
    satuation is on it.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Mar 5, 2005
    #16
  17. xlo

    E. Scrooge Guest

    "Stephen Worthington" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 5 Mar 2005 00:28:57 +1300, "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz
    > (*sling)> wrote:
    >
    >>Your old family videos may look better after you've captured them to DivX,
    >>then load the capture file back to VD and use some of the filters on it to
    >>improve the picture quality - colours - contrast - softness - sharpness
    >>are
    >>some of the useful filters in VD. It won't affect your original capture
    >>file as you play round with it, just save it to different file name.
    >>Power
    >>Producer does a real good job of converting and burning video files to
    >>VCD,
    >>SVCD, & DVD. Editing takes a bit of getting used to as it's the complete
    >>opposite to editing down videos with VD, but it doesn't cause sound sync
    >>problem like editing chunks out with VD does.
    >>
    >>E. Scrooge

    >
    > So you are saying that PowerProducer will edit DivX AVI files? I
    > would like something better than VDub for that.


    If you leave DivX AVI files as they are with no plans of converting them,
    then editing bits out with VD is fine and real easy of course. Only when
    the edited file is converted problems with sound sync happen.
    With Power Producer it cuts out the bits you want to keep putting them in a
    work area below. Then the segments are simply merged together into 1 video
    ready for converting and burning. It will create very good VCDs & SVCDs.
    When editing with Power Producer it means you have to keep reloading the
    original video to edit, because in a TV show for example you only want the
    bits between the ads. Everything gets cut up to the end of the 1st ad, and
    everything gets cut from the start of the 2nd ad break onwards. The first
    bit of video that you want is left and selected down below ready to be
    merged with the other bits that are chopped out between the ads. It might
    sound hard compared editing with VD, and it is at first until you get used
    to it. Worth it if want to see peoples lips move in good sync with the
    sound of their voices. You can cut the bits out pretty damn fine down to
    fractions of a second using the frame at a time back and forth buttons.
    Allowing for good smooth joins without the ads.
    If you got a lot of small video files of the same resolution, you can load
    them all into Power Producer and merge the lot togeth into 1 long video
    file. You have to do in steps of merging 5 videos at a time. No problem
    though, after you've done the first 5, you then just merge the next 4 into
    it, and then the next 4 after that and so on. Power Producer creates a menu
    that shows up on the DVD player. At the final encoding and burning screen,
    you can choose if you want it to embed a software DVD player and codecs onto
    the video CD. Then when it's shoved into most computers even if they don't
    have the codecs needed, the player on the CD will load up with the menu of
    the video on it ready to start playing. The player it puts on is a very
    small file, and quite neat to use. Not needed if you're only going to use
    the CDs on DVD players though. Power Director is another good program with
    a lot of features and special effects for editing with. Probably even
    better for home videos as you can ad some text titles to the videos and some
    professional looking wipes between different scenes.

    E. Scrooge
    E. Scrooge, Mar 5, 2005
    #17
  18. xlo

    Adder Guest

    In article <1109934193.510812@ftpsrv1>, scrooge@*shot.co.nz says...
    >
    > "cowboyz" <> wrote in message
    > news:d08om5$501$...
    > >
    > >
    > > Stephen Worthington wrote:
    > >> On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 11:01:01 +1300, xlo <>
    > >> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old
    > >>> videos are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them
    > >>> before any more time passes. I can get it working - but video
    > >>> quality is a bit less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to
    > >>> experiment, and I wondered if anyone had done this, then they might
    > >>> be able to offer me a few tips. Googling leads me to total
    > >>> confusion on this subject - I probably don't know the question well
    > >>> enough.
    > >>>
    > >>> Using composite video output from the video player.
    > >>
    > >> Here is the start of your problems. To get everything that is on a
    > >> VHS tape, it is best to use an S-VHS video for capturing the data to
    > >> disk. That way you will have a realistic chance of getting all the
    > >> quality that exists on the tape. VHS videos are built very much to a
    > >> price these days, and they limit the bandwidth to VHS only, and often
    > >> to less than what the VHS specification actually allows for. You need
    > >> some headroom above the VHS signal to be able to capture it fully, and
    > >> an S-VHS video gives you that, plus they are still built to a better
    > >> quality standard (and cost much more too of course).
    > >>
    > >>> Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are
    > >>> PAL - I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N?
    > >>> Does it matter? Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead PAL and NTSC
    > >>> drivers as the video player does both - and I do have a couple of
    > >>> NTSC videos that I might want to encode. The video player states
    > >>> PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43. On the other hand it also states NTSC playback
    > >>> on PAL TV - but I could only ever get NTSC videos to play back on
    > >>> certain (Sony) TVs.
    > >>
    > >> NZ is definitely not PAL B, so try PAL G -

    > >
    > >
    > > huh? Is too.

    >
    > LOL For a minute there I was thinking I was only one that uses PAL B, I've
    > also used PAL M as well.


    ythe various pal standards are about Tv transmission
    if stuff is played on a video with the direct sokets it wont matter so
    much what pal is in use

    the stadards are for number of lines, frequency and sound separatons

    the sound separaton frequencys are 5.5 6.0 and 6.5 mhz and account for
    some of the difrent versons of Pal. these are for boardcast Tv
    transmisions when the sound carrier and video carrier are x mhz apart and
    doesnt effect composite video signals which dont use Rf modulation

    Iirc Pal M is 625 lines on 50 Hz or 525 lines on 60 Hz or some oddball
    like that so why would you use it
    used in brazil or somwehre
    Adder, Mar 7, 2005
    #18
  19. xlo

    Adder Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > In article <1109934193.510812@ftpsrv1>, scrooge@*shot.co.nz says...
    > >
    > > "cowboyz" <> wrote in message
    > > news:d08om5$501$...
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Stephen Worthington wrote:
    > > >> On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 11:01:01 +1300, xlo <>
    > > >> wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >>> I'm trying to encode old family videos to DivX format. The old
    > > >>> videos are deteriorating - and it would be very nice to archive them
    > > >>> before any more time passes. I can get it working - but video
    > > >>> quality is a bit less than I hoped for. It takes (a lot of) time to
    > > >>> experiment, and I wondered if anyone had done this, then they might
    > > >>> be able to offer me a few tips. Googling leads me to total
    > > >>> confusion on this subject - I probably don't know the question well
    > > >>> enough.
    > > >>>
    > > >>> Using composite video output from the video player.
    > > >>
    > > >> Here is the start of your problems. To get everything that is on a
    > > >> VHS tape, it is best to use an S-VHS video for capturing the data to
    > > >> disk. That way you will have a realistic chance of getting all the
    > > >> quality that exists on the tape. VHS videos are built very much to a
    > > >> price these days, and they limit the bandwidth to VHS only, and often
    > > >> to less than what the VHS specification actually allows for. You need
    > > >> some headroom above the VHS signal to be able to capture it fully, and
    > > >> an S-VHS video gives you that, plus they are still built to a better
    > > >> quality standard (and cost much more too of course).
    > > >>
    > > >>> Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are
    > > >>> PAL - I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N?
    > > >>> Does it matter? Maybe stupidly, I installed both Ulead PAL and NTSC
    > > >>> drivers as the video player does both - and I do have a couple of
    > > >>> NTSC videos that I might want to encode. The video player states
    > > >>> PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43. On the other hand it also states NTSC playback
    > > >>> on PAL TV - but I could only ever get NTSC videos to play back on
    > > >>> certain (Sony) TVs.
    > > >>
    > > >> NZ is definitely not PAL B, so try PAL G -
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > huh? Is too.

    > >
    > > LOL For a minute there I was thinking I was only one that uses PAL B, I've
    > > also used PAL M as well.

    >
    > ythe various pal standards are about Tv transmission
    > if stuff is played on a video with the direct sokets it wont matter so
    > much what pal is in use
    >
    > the stadards are for number of lines, frequency and sound separatons
    >
    > the sound separaton frequencys are 5.5 6.0 and 6.5 mhz and account for
    > some of the difrent versons of Pal. these are for boardcast Tv
    > transmisions when the sound carrier and video carrier are x mhz apart and
    > doesnt effect composite video signals which dont use Rf modulation
    >
    > Iirc Pal M is 625 lines on 50 Hz or 525 lines on 60 Hz or some oddball

    that should be 625/60 or 525/50

    the std in Nz Uk etc is 625/50

    > like that so why would you use it
    > used in brazil or somwehre
    >
    Adder, Mar 7, 2005
    #19
  20. In article <1109887241.538979@ftpsrv1>, xlo <>
    wrote:

    >Using composite video output from the video player.
    >Ulead Video Studio "capture properties" defaults to NTSC. These are PAL
    >- I can select PAL - but which one - PAL B, D, G, I, M, or N?


    The difference only matters for RF. For composite, S-Video or component
    connections, it makes no difference.

    >The video player states PAL B/G - NTSC 4.43.
    >On the other hand it also states NTSC playback on PAL TV - but I could
    >only ever get NTSC videos to play back on certain (Sony) TVs.


    That's because NTSC 4.43 isn't "real" NTSC. 4.43 MHz is the frequency of
    the colour subcarrier for PAL, whereas for NTSC it's supposed to be 3.58
    MHz. Think of NTSC 4.43 as a fudge to allow playback on TVs that are
    more attuned to PAL frequencies.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Mar 13, 2005
    #20
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