disheartened

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by me, Nov 5, 2005.

  1. me

    me Guest

    I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
    certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
    wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad money--BUT
    they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+
    years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than $9
    an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current state
    of the job market and the current attitude of employers....

    Anyone else have this problem?
    me, Nov 5, 2005
    #1
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  2. me

    John Guest

    me wrote:
    > I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
    > certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
    > wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad money--BUT
    > they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+
    > years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than $9
    > an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current state
    > of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
    >
    > Anyone else have this problem?
    >
    >


    I was making nearly $20/hour (no certifications, no background) as an admin
    at a positively awful company. Each day was torture. The IT director was a
    flaming moron. Even though I didn't have a job lined up, I quit anyway.

    I'm in the process of getting 5 certs from A+ (which, in and by itself, is
    useless but it's a starting point) to CCNA.

    If you think that getting a job as a tech is bad, try getting a job as a
    programmer (can you say "out-sourceable"?)
    John, Nov 5, 2005
    #2
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  3. John wrote:
    > I was making nearly $20/hour (no certifications, no background) as an
    > admin at a positively awful company. Each day was torture. The IT
    > director was a flaming moron. Even though I didn't have a job lined up,
    > I quit anyway.
    >
    > I'm in the process of getting 5 certs from A+ (which, in and by itself,
    > is useless but it's a starting point) to CCNA.
    >
    > If you think that getting a job as a tech is bad, try getting a job as a
    > programmer (can you say "out-sourceable"?)

    John, Thankyou for reminding us. I used to be disheartened.

    Christopher
    Christopher Range, Nov 5, 2005
    #3
  4. me

    Winter Guest

    I have been looking for about 2 mos. now. I've had one offer and that was
    to fix printers on a assembly line for$12 an hr. I was a Service Manager at
    a Harley-Davidson store making $60,000 a year. I quit to pursue an IT
    career. I am having my head examined next week.
    I'm A+ with 10yrs. telephony exp. w/ Nortel Networks if your hiring. My son
    makes more money than I do now.
    If you see me out in the yard, shoot me! Just Kidding!
    Winter, Nov 6, 2005
    #4
  5. me

    SBFan2000 Guest

    I know how you feel, I deal with IT guys everyday that are complete idiots.
    I'm amazed that some have a job as an administrator. I had one Friday that
    I had to teach on how to install a print driver on their network. The sad
    thing is that I'm not even an IT guy, what I know about networking is self
    taught! I just install and repair Toshiba Copiers and Multifunction
    printers, and I knew more about his network then he did! Really sad.


    "Christopher Range" <> wrote in message
    news:9u9bf.1142$...
    > John wrote:
    > > I was making nearly $20/hour (no certifications, no background) as an
    > > admin at a positively awful company. Each day was torture. The IT
    > > director was a flaming moron. Even though I didn't have a job lined up,
    > > I quit anyway.
    > >
    > > I'm in the process of getting 5 certs from A+ (which, in and by itself,
    > > is useless but it's a starting point) to CCNA.
    > >
    > > If you think that getting a job as a tech is bad, try getting a job as a
    > > programmer (can you say "out-sourceable"?)

    > John, Thankyou for reminding us. I used to be disheartened.
    >
    > Christopher
    >




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    SBFan2000, Nov 6, 2005
    #5
  6. me

    SuperTech Guest

    "me" <> wrote in
    news:MH4bf.9$:

    > I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects
    > available to a certified technician in todays market. Every
    > employer I have seen only wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15
    > per hour--which isn't bad money--BUT they want you to have an
    > MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+ years experience
    > before they will offer you the job. I make more than $9 an hour
    > now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current
    > state of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
    >
    > Anyone else have this problem?


    It's a seller's market. I was apart of company that merged with
    another company. After a while I had to bail, could not take it
    anymore (benefit cuts, shaving of workforce, ridiculous working hours,
    etc)! I was making 42000/year and now I make 38000/year. Actually,
    with bonuses it will probably be close to 40000/year, but the new
    employer is not much better then the old one! Now I'm again looking
    for another job. Took 5 months just to get ONE call back for my last
    search.

    Well, anyways, in my new search I get a callback from a law firm.
    Since I'm on probation with the new company I can't take off from work
    (as explained in my cover letter). We agreed to meet at 7:30 AM in the
    morning later in the week. The guy calls back the next day and says
    "no can do". I try to arrange another time later in the day, but he
    won't budge. "You work around me, not the other way around!". Of
    course, I'm really not the one in the position of being flexible: he
    is. Basically I have to pass on the interview because he's being a
    pain in-the-neck.

    Funny thing is I saw the job reposted in the paper last week...LOL...so
    whoever he hired didn't work out.

    Yes, the IT field is depressing.

    SuperTech
    SuperTech, Nov 7, 2005
    #6
  7. I think many people have discovered that A+ alone is not very marketable.
    That's why this newsgroup has declined from a very active forum to only a
    few posts a day.

    I feel very fortunate to have the job I have. I started with this company
    in a completely different job and evolved into the IT guy. I got A+, Net+,
    MCSA, and MCSE since then, but it hasn't gotten me even a raise that is more
    than inflation. Now, with six years of IT experience under my belt, maybe
    it's time to start looking again.

    --
    Carlos

    "me" <> wrote in message
    news:MH4bf.9$...
    > I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
    > certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
    > wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad money--BUT
    > they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+
    > years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than

    $9
    > an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current

    state
    > of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
    >
    > Anyone else have this problem?
    >
    >
    CarlosAntenna, Nov 7, 2005
    #7
  8. me

    dave Guest

    me wrote:
    > I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
    > certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
    > wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad money--BUT
    > they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+
    > years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than $9
    > an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current state
    > of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
    >
    > Anyone else have this problem?
    >
    >


    Tough it out, or go change careers and find a trade you
    like then, like a mechanic, or plumber then.

    Nobody ever promised you a rose garden when you decided
    to get into Computing;
    dave, Nov 7, 2005
    #8
  9. Kathy wrote:
    > me wrote:
    >
    >> I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
    >> certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
    >> wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad
    >> money--BUT
    >> they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+
    >> years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more
    >> than $9
    >> an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current
    >> state
    >> of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
    >>
    >> Anyone else have this problem?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > It WAS somewhat of a problem for me, but I do computer work on my own
    > now. I'm my own boss and I like it that way.
    >
    > Hey I learned to suck it up because "you can't always get what you want"
    > I'm not complaining about the job market, I love computer work! ;-)

    I am thinking(uh oh) of, starting my own business, because of, the
    behavior of the job market.

    Christopher
    Christopher Range, Nov 8, 2005
    #9
  10. me

    EJay05 Guest

    :)Very eye-opening topic as I have just decided to create a stud
    regimen for A+ to improve my marketability as I am still in th
    market for an IT job since May when I got N+ certified. So far I onl
    had one interview (this was even before I got N+ certified) with
    well-known resort only 2 blocks away from me, the only reason I eve
    got an interview was b/c my Doctor had another patient that wa
    recruiting for a network technician and he put in a very good wor
    for me and even pushed it to get me an interview. Well I DID and
    nailed all the 'technical' questions the IT people (they were only
    ppl) shot at me (which weren't too difficult, they were kind). When
    finally got interviewed from the vice pres. I was interviewed a bi
    more & told they'd start me on monday. Only to later find ou
    that the actual pres had created a hiring freeze on every dep
    (excellent timing :rolleyes:), after that I got an apology? from the
    saying thier pres was anal or somethin

    I wasn't too phased b/c I thought "easy come, easy go" and it woul
    always be this simple to get interviewed an a job. Well, I a
    learning otherwise to the point where I am starting to study fo
    another certification :evil
    EJay05, Nov 9, 2005
    #10
  11. me

    Guest

    me wrote:
    > I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
    > certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
    > wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad money--BUT
    > they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+
    > years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than $9
    > an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current state
    > of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
    >
    > Anyone else have this problem?


    The problem is that those in the IT field are the modern day
    equivalents of the "tube changers" of the 50's and 60's who called
    themselves TV repairmen. Truth be told, a monkey can be taught how to
    fix or build a computer.... or at least, a functionally retarded
    person. Very little brain power is required.

    The field is oversaturated. The work is boring beyond words. There are
    some companies who pay as much as the local fast food joints. The
    entire certification institution is a scam.

    Focus on another career; a career where you can make good money... and
    a good living... one that will allow you to use your brain.

    Good luck
    , Nov 13, 2005
    #11
  12. me

    jc Guest

    There are some things that can be learned from this whole situation. If you
    are in a job that pays well and it is not IT related, don't leave it for IT.
    Yes everyone wants experience, it's like the catch 22 with credit, nobody is
    willing to take a chance on you. Yes, most people want a BS in comp sci or
    info systems and this is for good reason. An employer wants someone that
    has the ability to learn something new and can do it quickly - this is all a
    BS tells them. Certifications alone are really worthless, experience is
    what counts, and A+ is about totally worthless.

    If you have to, do free IT work for churches, non-profit groups, and other
    organizations that always have a hand out. This will get you experience and
    also help you make connections that might get you interviews where you want
    to be. Take a good look at your resume, have other both technical and non
    technical people look at it and follow the suggestion they give - it helps
    to have someone that does hiring as the one looking. Tailor each resume and
    cover letter to the job listed or the job you want. Follow up with phone
    calls or another letter. The law of averages also needs to be applied here,
    the more resumes you send out the better your chances are of getting a call
    back. You really have to sell yourself to someone, each job may attract
    more than 100 resumes and you need to have one that gets you an interview.

    In an interview be honest, don't bs, it will be obvious. This is the point
    where you need to talk the part, walk the part, and dress the part - the
    toughest thing is if you worked in a factory, mill or plant - forget
    everything you did there. Take notes in the interview and ask lots of
    questions(not money or benefit related), this will show an interest as well
    as much more. Practice your interview skills, over and over, there are lots
    of good resources online that will prep you with questions. In the
    interview never be afraid to say you don't have experience with something
    but you are willing to learn it. Also, when asked about what you have done
    to stay current with IT trends, have answers. There are a lot of free
    resources at microsoft, sans, cicso, and others - webcasts and free events
    you should be attending. Last thing for the interview, don't go in there
    like these people owe you something, it is your job to get or lose, it's up
    to you - and always follow up an interview with a personal thank you letter.

    I was in a job, IT, that I hated. I had looked for about a year to leave.
    Once I got serious about getting out I cranked out 3-5 resumes a week and
    made a lot of calls. It was about 4 months till I started the new job.
    Don't expect you are going to start at the top (if this is your first IT
    job), you will have to start with idiot IT work until you prove what you can
    handle. Never lose hope, this is self doom.

    Good luck


    "me" <> wrote in message
    news:MH4bf.9$...
    >I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
    > certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
    > wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad money--BUT
    > they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+
    > years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than
    > $9
    > an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current
    > state
    > of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
    >
    > Anyone else have this problem?
    >
    >
    jc, Nov 22, 2005
    #12
  13. me

    Guest

    Dems are Back wrote:
    > Opinions are like assholes: everyone has one. The industry was damaged
    > by the offhshoring of tens of thousands of jobs.


    Welcome to the 21st century. It's only going to get worse. The IT field
    is crumbling!

    >IT, in fact, is a
    > mentally demnding industry and most of the colleges only allow the
    > brighter students into these programs.


    You think? I deligated thousands of jobs to 20+ of the "lowest wattage
    bulbs" I have ever encountered. They all had several certs. What's this
    tell you?

    >I don't think millivolt has ever
    > worked in a NOC or the server room.


    I only wish that were the case ;-)
    , Nov 26, 2005
    #13
  14. jc,

    Good, detailed advice. If you really like the IT field, you should have no
    problem giving a little of your time for free to expand your
    skills...............I like that.

    --
    Edward A. Weissbard
    El Paso, TX

    "Life is easy with eyes closed"

    "jc" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There are some things that can be learned from this whole situation. If

    you
    > are in a job that pays well and it is not IT related, don't leave it for

    IT.
    > Yes everyone wants experience, it's like the catch 22 with credit, nobody

    is
    > willing to take a chance on you. Yes, most people want a BS in comp sci

    or
    > info systems and this is for good reason. An employer wants someone that
    > has the ability to learn something new and can do it quickly - this is all

    a
    > BS tells them. Certifications alone are really worthless, experience is
    > what counts, and A+ is about totally worthless.
    >
    > If you have to, do free IT work for churches, non-profit groups, and other
    > organizations that always have a hand out. This will get you experience

    and
    > also help you make connections that might get you interviews where you

    want
    > to be. Take a good look at your resume, have other both technical and non
    > technical people look at it and follow the suggestion they give - it helps
    > to have someone that does hiring as the one looking. Tailor each resume

    and
    > cover letter to the job listed or the job you want. Follow up with phone
    > calls or another letter. The law of averages also needs to be applied

    here,
    > the more resumes you send out the better your chances are of getting a

    call
    > back. You really have to sell yourself to someone, each job may attract
    > more than 100 resumes and you need to have one that gets you an interview.
    >
    > In an interview be honest, don't bs, it will be obvious. This is the

    point
    > where you need to talk the part, walk the part, and dress the part - the
    > toughest thing is if you worked in a factory, mill or plant - forget
    > everything you did there. Take notes in the interview and ask lots of
    > questions(not money or benefit related), this will show an interest as

    well
    > as much more. Practice your interview skills, over and over, there are

    lots
    > of good resources online that will prep you with questions. In the
    > interview never be afraid to say you don't have experience with something
    > but you are willing to learn it. Also, when asked about what you have

    done
    > to stay current with IT trends, have answers. There are a lot of free
    > resources at microsoft, sans, cicso, and others - webcasts and free events
    > you should be attending. Last thing for the interview, don't go in there
    > like these people owe you something, it is your job to get or lose, it's

    up
    > to you - and always follow up an interview with a personal thank you

    letter.
    >
    > I was in a job, IT, that I hated. I had looked for about a year to leave.
    > Once I got serious about getting out I cranked out 3-5 resumes a week and
    > made a lot of calls. It was about 4 months till I started the new job.
    > Don't expect you are going to start at the top (if this is your first IT
    > job), you will have to start with idiot IT work until you prove what you

    can
    > handle. Never lose hope, this is self doom.
    >
    > Good luck
    >
    >
    > "me" <> wrote in message
    > news:MH4bf.9$...
    > >I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
    > > certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
    > > wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad

    money--BUT
    > > they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and

    5+
    > > years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than
    > > $9
    > > an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current
    > > state
    > > of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
    > >
    > > Anyone else have this problem?
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    Edward A. Weissbard, Jan 13, 2006
    #14
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