Discharge Computer Monitor

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by aaaa, Jan 12, 2006.

  1. aaaa

    aaaa Guest

    I have an old nonfunctional computer monitor that I would like to use
    in an art project. However, I have read several scary posts about how a
    monitor can store a lethal charge of electricity. The posts mention
    several ways to discharge the monitor. However, the ways sound somewhat
    dangerous for a novice to try. My idea is to simply throw the monitor
    into a pool. The water should short out the capacitor and eliminate the
    charge, right?

    If you see anything wrong with this idea, please let me know.

    Thanks in advance
     
    aaaa, Jan 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. aaaa wrote:
    > I have an old nonfunctional computer monitor that I would like to use
    > in an art project. However, I have read several scary posts about how a
    > monitor can store a lethal charge of electricity. The posts mention
    > several ways to discharge the monitor. However, the ways sound somewhat
    > dangerous for a novice to try. My idea is to simply throw the monitor
    > into a pool. The water should short out the capacitor and eliminate the
    > charge, right?
    >
    > If you see anything wrong with this idea, please let me know.
    >
    > Thanks in advance



    If it's been off for a while it should be alright.

    Otherwise, there is a rubber suction cup attached to the tube. Under
    it there are two metal electrodes. Put the blade end of a flathead
    screwdriver across these electrodes and the cap will drain.
     
    General Specific, Jan 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. aaaa

    Erick Guest

    The capacitor will drain alright... In one big spark. Not a smart idea. And
    throwing it in water isn't much better, as it will likely cause a small
    explosion within the tubes when the capacitor discharges.


    "General Specific" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    aaaa wrote:
    > I have an old nonfunctional computer monitor that I would like to use
    > in an art project. However, I have read several scary posts about how a
    > monitor can store a lethal charge of electricity. The posts mention
    > several ways to discharge the monitor. However, the ways sound somewhat
    > dangerous for a novice to try. My idea is to simply throw the monitor
    > into a pool. The water should short out the capacitor and eliminate the
    > charge, right?
    >
    > If you see anything wrong with this idea, please let me know.
    >
    > Thanks in advance



    If it's been off for a while it should be alright.

    Otherwise, there is a rubber suction cup attached to the tube. Under
    it there are two metal electrodes. Put the blade end of a flathead
    screwdriver across these electrodes and the cap will drain.
     
    Erick, Jan 13, 2006
    #3
  4. aaaa

    aaaa Guest

    A small explosion is fine since I won't be anywhere near the monitor
    when it happens.
     
    aaaa, Jan 13, 2006
    #4
  5. This is how it's done. Just be sure to hold the handle of the
    screwdriver.


    Erick wrote:
    > The capacitor will drain alright... In one big spark. Not a smart idea. And
    > throwing it in water isn't much better, as it will likely cause a small
    > explosion within the tubes when the capacitor discharges.
    >
    >
    > "General Specific" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    > aaaa wrote:
    > > I have an old nonfunctional computer monitor that I would like to use
    > > in an art project. However, I have read several scary posts about how a
    > > monitor can store a lethal charge of electricity. The posts mention
    > > several ways to discharge the monitor. However, the ways sound somewhat
    > > dangerous for a novice to try. My idea is to simply throw the monitor
    > > into a pool. The water should short out the capacitor and eliminate the
    > > charge, right?
    > >
    > > If you see anything wrong with this idea, please let me know.
    > >
    > > Thanks in advance

    >
    >
    > If it's been off for a while it should be alright.
    >
    > Otherwise, there is a rubber suction cup attached to the tube. Under
    > it there are two metal electrodes. Put the blade end of a flathead
    > screwdriver across these electrodes and the cap will drain.
     
    General Specific, Jan 13, 2006
    #5
  6. aaaa

    D S Guest

    Your messing with something that can blind you , poison you, and
    electrocute you. It's a dangerous commodity, I've seen them explode and
    shock people where I worked. One left on a stretcher after being
    shocked.
     
    D S, Jan 14, 2006
    #6
  7. aaaa

    aaaa Guest

    >Your messing with something that can blind you , poison you, and
    >electrocute you. It's a dangerous commodity, I've seen them explode and
    >shock people where I worked. One left on a stretcher after being
    >shocked.


    I agree. I'm trying to remove or at least reduce the risk. I could
    flood the monitor remotely, say by putting the monitor in a bucket with
    a hose and turning on the hose remotely. Would this make the monitor
    safe? Would the water reach the cap and discharge it? I do not want to
    open the monitor if it is charged and dangerous.
     
    aaaa, Jan 14, 2006
    #7
  8. aaaa

    Kawosa Guest

    "aaaa" <> wrote in news:1137250636.945284.168690
    @g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

    >>Your messing with something that can blind you , poison you, and
    >>electrocute you. It's a dangerous commodity, I've seen them explode and
    >>shock people where I worked. One left on a stretcher after being
    >>shocked.

    >
    > I agree. I'm trying to remove or at least reduce the risk. I could
    > flood the monitor remotely, say by putting the monitor in a bucket with
    > a hose and turning on the hose remotely. Would this make the monitor
    > safe? Would the water reach the cap and discharge it? I do not want to
    > open the monitor if it is charged and dangerous.
    >


    Your best bet is to use a long shanked screw driver with a grounded wire
    attached to the shank. But then what is the purpose of this action? I
    didn't see the original post.


    ---
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    Kawosa, Jan 15, 2006
    #8
  9. aaaa

    JANA Guest

    After reading all these posts, everyone has their own idea of how to be safe
    with a monitor. The procedure used in the shop to discharge the CRT anode is
    to take a high voltage insulated flat blade screwdriver, and put a grounding
    wire to the shaft of it. The wire must be grounded to the main electrical
    ground of the monitor. The blade is then slipped under the suction cup, and
    held touching the metal anode contact for about 15 seconds.

    Because of the high resistance of the anode cap and anode feed from the
    flyback, it is possible over time to build up some charge. The secondary
    build-up is not dangerous, but can give a nasty jolt.

    The second part to be concerned with is the main power supply of the
    monitor. It is possible that the main filter capacitors can hold their
    charge for a fair amount of time. The procedure to discharge these is to put
    a resistor of approximately 100 ohms at 10 watts rated across each of the
    main capacitors for about 15 to 20 seconds. Care must be taken to not
    accidentally touch the leads.

    As for the safety of all of this, a trained TV service person uses these
    techniques as necessary. When new at this procedure, the techs are doing
    this under supervision. In most shops it is not allowed to have people
    servicing monitors when alone.

    As for the safety of taking apart a monitor, the CRT is particularly
    dangerous. There is a danger for implosion. The CRT is a high vacuum glass
    bottle of sorts, that can be extremely dangerous if accidentally knocked, or
    handled roughly. Protective eyewear and heavy clothing is recommended if
    removing the CRT from the cabinet. The phosphors used in the CRT are
    extremely dangerous if they get in to the eyes, or are breathed in to the
    lungs. If there is breakage of the CRT, there is the chance for exposure to
    the phosphors, if they are disturbed and become airborne from the inrush of
    the air.

    This is why it is strongly recommended that you, as an end user, properly
    dispose of an old monitor or TV set. It is not something to be taken apart
    by someone who is not qualified to do so.


    --

    JANA
    _____


    "aaaa" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    I have an old nonfunctional computer monitor that I would like to use
    in an art project. However, I have read several scary posts about how a
    monitor can store a lethal charge of electricity. The posts mention
    several ways to discharge the monitor. However, the ways sound somewhat
    dangerous for a novice to try. My idea is to simply throw the monitor
    into a pool. The water should short out the capacitor and eliminate the
    charge, right?

    If you see anything wrong with this idea, please let me know.

    Thanks in advance
     
    JANA, Jan 15, 2006
    #9
  10. aaaa

    aaaa Guest

    Kawosa wrote:
    > Your best bet is to use a long shanked screw driver with a grounded wire
    > attached to the shank. But then what is the purpose of this action? I
    > didn't see the original post.


    I'd use the monitor for an art project. I don't care if the electronics
    of the monitor are damaged as long as the physical structure of the
    monitor remains intact.

    Thank you JANA for pointing out the toxic phosphors and other dangers
    besides the electrical charge.
     
    aaaa, Jan 17, 2006
    #10
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