disabling wi-fi

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Linea Recta, Apr 14, 2008.

  1. Linea Recta

    Linea Recta Guest

    Is it possible to disable the wi-fi part (temporarily) for security reasons?
    I'm using a wi-fi modem/router which is connected to PC by cable. Wi-fi is
    used for a laptop and a PPC.
    But when the modem/router is turned on, it also permanently broadcasts wi-fi
    and I would like an (software)option to interrupt this momentarily, while
    adsl modem part remaining active.




    --
    regards,

    |\ /|
    | \/ |@rk
    \../
    \/os
    Linea Recta, Apr 14, 2008
    #1
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  2. Linea Recta

    smlunatick Guest

    On Apr 14, 2:27 pm, "Linea Recta" <> wrote:
    > Is it possible to disable the wi-fi part (temporarily) for security reasons?
    > I'm using a wi-fi modem/router which is connected to PC by cable. Wi-fi is
    > used for a laptop and a PPC.
    > But when the modem/router is turned on, it also permanently broadcasts wi-fi
    > and I would like an (software)option to interrupt this momentarily, while
    > adsl modem part remaining active.
    >
    > --
    > regards,
    >
    > |\  /|
    > | \/ |@rk
    >  \../
    >   \/os


    Router WiFi can not be turned off temporary. It can only be turned
    off / on until you turn it back on / off. You will need to read up on
    the various WiFi secuirty offered by most routers. Wireless router
    need to provide signal security where the network clients (laptops /
    PPC) need to send the matching "access key" before the wireless
    network will grant access to the network.

    Sample access key secuirty levels (lowest to highest security
    provided)

    None
    WEP 40bit
    WEP 128bit
    WPA
    WPA2

    Note: WEP (both) are supposed to be easily "cracked." WPA2 is fairly
    new.
    smlunatick, Apr 14, 2008
    #2
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  3. Some wireless routers have a function to disable (ie. turn off) the wireless
    radio. Check your users manual for help with that.

    With that said if your wireless network is properly secured leaving the
    wireless radio enable is no security risk at all. My wireless network is
    encrypted with WPA-PSK (AES) and a 63-character random ASCII key. My
    wireless network is turned on 24/7 whether I am home or away for short or
    long term travel...

    http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/LAN/SoHoWirelessSecurity.html

    --

    Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows - Desktop User Experience)

    Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the
    mutual benefit of all of us...
    The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights...
    How to ask a question
    http://support.microsoft.com/KB/555375

    "Linea Recta" <> wrote in message
    news:4803a20b$0$14350$4all.nl...
    > Is it possible to disable the wi-fi part (temporarily) for security
    > reasons?
    > I'm using a wi-fi modem/router which is connected to PC by cable. Wi-fi is
    > used for a laptop and a PPC.
    > But when the modem/router is turned on, it also permanently broadcasts
    > wi-fi
    > and I would like an (software)option to interrupt this momentarily, while
    > adsl modem part remaining active.
    >
    > --
    > regards,
    >
    > |\ /|
    > | \/ |@rk
    > \../
    > \/os
    >
    Sooner Al [MVP], Apr 14, 2008
    #3
  4. Linea Recta

    John Guest

    "Linea Recta" <> wrote in message
    news:4803a20b$0$14350$4all.nl...
    > Is it possible to disable the wi-fi part (temporarily) for security
    > reasons?


    Only if your (router) configuration allows switching WiFi on/off.

    > I'm using a wi-fi modem/router which is connected to PC by cable. Wi-fi is
    > used for a laptop and a PPC.


    We can give you better answer if you tell us the make and model of your
    router.

    > But when the modem/router is turned on, it also permanently broadcasts
    > wi-fi
    > and I would like an (software)option to interrupt this momentarily,


    Again... only if your router configuration setting has an option to swicth
    WiFi signal on/off.
    John, Apr 14, 2008
    #4
  5. Linea Recta

    Linea Recta Guest

    "smlunatick" <> schreef in bericht
    news:...
    On Apr 14, 2:27 pm, "Linea Recta" <> wrote:



    ---------------------------start quote

    > Is it possible to disable the wi-fi part (temporarily) for security
    > reasons?
    > I'm using a wi-fi modem/router which is connected to PC by cable. Wi-fi is
    > used for a laptop and a PPC.
    > But when the modem/router is turned on, it also permanently broadcasts
    > wi-fi
    > and I would like an (software)option to interrupt this momentarily, while
    > adsl modem part remaining active.
    >
    > --
    > regards,
    >
    > |\ /|
    > | \/ |@rk
    > \../
    > \/os


    Router WiFi can not be turned off temporary. It can only be turned
    off / on until you turn it back on / off. You will need to read up on
    the various WiFi secuirty offered by most routers. Wireless router
    need to provide signal security where the network clients (laptops /
    PPC) need to send the matching "access key" before the wireless
    network will grant access to the network.

    Sample access key secuirty levels (lowest to highest security
    provided)

    None
    WEP 40bit
    WEP 128bit
    WPA
    WPA2

    Note: WEP (both) are supposed to be easily "cracked." WPA2 is fairly
    new.


    ---------------------------end quote

    Perhaps I also had to mention: of course I use WPA security. But still, I
    think no signal is more secure (only for incidental instances) than
    encrypted signal.



    --
    regards,

    |\ /|
    | \/ |@rk
    \../
    \/os
    Linea Recta, Apr 14, 2008
    #5
  6. Linea Recta

    Linea Recta Guest

    "John" <a> schreef in bericht news:...
    >
    > "Linea Recta" <> wrote in message
    > news:4803a20b$0$14350$4all.nl...
    >> Is it possible to disable the wi-fi part (temporarily) for security
    >> reasons?

    >
    > Only if your (router) configuration allows switching WiFi on/off.
    >
    >> I'm using a wi-fi modem/router which is connected to PC by cable. Wi-fi
    >> is
    >> used for a laptop and a PPC.

    >
    > We can give you better answer if you tell us the make and model of your
    > router.



    Sitecom ADSL2+ Modem/Router 54G Turbo WL-174

    (of course I use wpa secure connection when on line)


    --
    regards,

    |\ /|
    | \/ |@rk
    \../
    \/os
    Linea Recta, Apr 14, 2008
    #6
  7. Linea Recta

    John Guest

    "Linea Recta" <> wrote in message
    news:4803c00d$0$14349$4all.nl...
    >>
    >> We can give you better answer if you tell us the make and model of your
    >> router.

    >
    >
    > Sitecom ADSL2+ Modem/Router 54G Turbo WL-174


    Get the manual for your WL-174 router at the following (link may wrap
    around):
    http://www.sitecom.com/product.php?...roductcode=WL-174&productid=538&subgroupid=43

    Page 20 Section 4.2.3 Wireless
    Look at the picture:
    Access Point - click Deactivated and save the settings

    > (of course I use wpa secure connection when on line)


    Good but if the router supports WPA2 security, use it. Otherwise, WPA with a
    long and hard to guess password is just as good.
    John, Apr 14, 2008
    #7
  8. Linea Recta

    Linea Recta Guest

    "John" <a> schreef in bericht news:...
    >
    > "Linea Recta" <> wrote in message
    > news:4803c00d$0$14349$4all.nl...
    >>>
    >>> We can give you better answer if you tell us the make and model of your
    >>> router.

    >>
    >>
    >> Sitecom ADSL2+ Modem/Router 54G Turbo WL-174

    >
    > Get the manual for your WL-174 router at the following (link may wrap
    > around):
    > http://www.sitecom.com/product.php?...roductcode=WL-174&productid=538&subgroupid=43
    >
    > Page 20 Section 4.2.3 Wireless
    > Look at the picture:
    > Access Point - click Deactivated and save the settings



    Good, I hadn't noticed that!
    Besides, I have a lot of questions about many of those settings, but I'll be
    back for those.


    >
    >> (of course I use wpa secure connection when on line)

    >
    > Good but if the router supports WPA2 security, use it. Otherwise, WPA with
    > a long and hard to guess password is just as good.



    I think the router does, laptop too, but I also want to be able to log in
    with a PPC (WM2003SE) and this device doesn't seem to support wpa2.



    --
    regards,

    |\ /|
    | \/ |@rk
    \../
    \/os
    Linea Recta, Apr 14, 2008
    #8
  9. Linea Recta

    John Guest

    "Linea Recta" <> wrote in message
    news:4803cab1$0$14343$4all.nl...
    >
    >> Good but if the router supports WPA2 security, use it. Otherwise, WPA
    >> with a long and hard to guess password is just as good.

    >
    > I think the router does, laptop too, but I also want to be able to log in
    > with a PPC (WM2003SE) and this device doesn't seem to support wpa2.
    >


    Well then your security is only as strong as the weakest link (WM2003 in
    this case). As I said earlier, if your password isn't short and/or a word
    found in a dictionary, WPA security should be good enough.
    John, Apr 14, 2008
    #9
  10. Hi
    May be this can Help.
    Wireless Basic Configuration - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Config.html
    Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

    From the weakest to the strongest, Wireless security capacity is.
    No Security
    MAC______(Band Aid if nothing else is available).
    WEP64____(Easy, to "Brake" by knowledgeable people).
    WEP128___(A little Harder, but "Hackable" too).
    WPA-PSK__(Very Hard to Brake ).
    WPA-AES__(Not functionally Breakable)
    WPA2____ (Not functionally Breakable).
    Note 1: WPA-AES the the current entry level rendition of WPA2.
    Note 2: If you use WinXP and did not updated it you would have to download
    the WPA2 patch from Microsoft. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/893357
    The documentation of your Wireless devices (Wireless Router, and Wireless
    Computer's Card) should state the type of security that is available with
    your Wireless hardware.
    All devices MUST be set to the same security level using the same pass
    phrase.
    Therefore the security must be set according what ever is the best possible
    of one of the Wireless devices.
    I.e. even if most of your system might be capable to be configured to the
    max. with WPA2, but one device is only capable to be configured to max . of
    WEP, to whole system must be configured to WEP.
    If you need more good security and one device (like a Wireless card that can
    do WEP only) is holding better security for the whole Network, replace the
    device with a better one.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).


    "Linea Recta" <> wrote in message
    news:4803cab1$0$14343$4all.nl...
    > "John" <a> schreef in bericht
    > news:...
    >>
    >> "Linea Recta" <> wrote in message
    >> news:4803c00d$0$14349$4all.nl...
    >>>>
    >>>> We can give you better answer if you tell us the make and model of your
    >>>> router.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Sitecom ADSL2+ Modem/Router 54G Turbo WL-174

    >>
    >> Get the manual for your WL-174 router at the following (link may wrap
    >> around):
    >> http://www.sitecom.com/product.php?...roductcode=WL-174&productid=538&subgroupid=43
    >>
    >> Page 20 Section 4.2.3 Wireless
    >> Look at the picture:
    >> Access Point - click Deactivated and save the settings

    >
    >
    > Good, I hadn't noticed that!
    > Besides, I have a lot of questions about many of those settings, but I'll
    > be back for those.
    >
    >
    >>
    >>> (of course I use wpa secure connection when on line)

    >>
    >> Good but if the router supports WPA2 security, use it. Otherwise, WPA
    >> with a long and hard to guess password is just as good.

    >
    >
    > I think the router does, laptop too, but I also want to be able to log in
    > with a PPC (WM2003SE) and this device doesn't seem to support wpa2.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > regards,
    >
    > |\ /|
    > | \/ |@rk
    > \../
    > \/os
    >
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Apr 15, 2008
    #10
  11. Linea Recta

    Linea Recta Guest

    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." <> schreef in bericht
    news:%...
    > Hi
    > May be this can Help.
    > Wireless Basic Configuration - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Config.html
    > Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html




    Thanks. (Never knew that security encryption limits the range too!
    I have sort of coax connector on the router in which fits a short rod
    antenna. Can the same connector be used to connect a coax wire for extending
    the antenna?



    --
    regards,

    |\ /|
    | \/ |@rk
    \../
    \/os
    Linea Recta, Apr 15, 2008
    #11
  12. Hi
    The coax and the Antenna must be specific for 2.4GHz.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).


    "Linea Recta" <> wrote in message
    news:480481cd$0$14346$4all.nl...
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." <> schreef in bericht
    > news:%...
    >> Hi
    >> May be this can Help.
    >> Wireless Basic Configuration - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Config.html
    >> Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks. (Never knew that security encryption limits the range too!
    > I have sort of coax connector on the router in which fits a short rod
    > antenna. Can the same connector be used to connect a coax wire for
    > extending
    > the antenna?
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > regards,
    >
    > |\ /|
    > | \/ |@rk
    > \../
    > \/os
    >
    >
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Apr 16, 2008
    #12
  13. Linea Recta

    smlunatick Guest

    On Apr 15, 6:22 am, "Linea Recta" <> wrote:
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." <> schreef in berichtnews:%...
    >
    > > Hi
    > > May be this can Help.
    > > Wireless Basic Configuration -http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Config.html
    > > Wireless Security -  http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

    >
    > Thanks. (Never knew that security encryption limits the range too!
    > I have sort of coax connector on the router in which fits a short rod
    > antenna. Can the same connector be used to connect a coax wire for extending
    > the antenna?
    >
    > --
    > regards,
    >
    > |\  /|
    > | \/ |@rk
    >  \../
    >   \/os


    There are serveral "coax" style connectors but these are not to be
    confused with the coax RG-5x style connectors.

    Serveral known "wireless" connectors:

    R-SNA
    N-Type
    TNA
    smlunatick, Apr 16, 2008
    #13
  14. Linea Recta

    Linea Recta Guest

    "smlunatick" <> schreef in bericht
    news:...
    On Apr 15, 6:22 am, "Linea Recta" <> wrote:
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." <> schreef in
    > berichtnews:%...
    >
    > > Hi
    > > May be this can Help.
    > > Wireless Basic Configuration -http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Config.html
    > > Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

    >
    > Thanks. (Never knew that security encryption limits the range too!
    > I have sort of coax connector on the router in which fits a short rod
    > antenna. Can the same connector be used to connect a coax wire for
    > extending
    > the antenna?
    >
    > --
    > regards,
    >
    > |\ /|
    > | \/ |@rk
    > \../
    > \/os


    ---------------start quote
    There are serveral "coax" style connectors but these are not to be
    confused with the coax RG-5x style connectors.

    Serveral known "wireless" connectors:

    R-SNA
    N-Type
    TNA
    -------------end quote

    And I suppose it must have the correct impedance (ohms). E.g. for TV is must
    be 75 Ohms.
    I was asking in the first place, because moving the router itself would
    involve extending many cables. If I could move only the radiating element
    (rod antenna) it would be more practical. But of course I don't want to
    loose power due to mismatches...

    I also tried another approach: parabolic reflector on the rod, but the
    results were not very succesful.


    --
    regards,

    |\ /|
    | \/ |@rk
    \../
    \/os
    Linea Recta, Apr 16, 2008
    #14
  15. Linea Recta

    smlunatick Guest

    On Apr 16, 10:33 am, "Linea Recta" <> wrote:
    > "smlunatick" <> schreef in berichtnews:...
    > On Apr 15, 6:22 am, "Linea Recta" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." <> schreef in
    > > berichtnews:%...

    >
    > > > Hi
    > > > May be this can Help.
    > > > Wireless Basic Configuration -http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Config.html
    > > > Wireless Security -http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

    >
    > > Thanks. (Never knew that security encryption limits the range too!
    > > I have sort of coax connector on the router in which fits a short rod
    > > antenna. Can the same connector be used to connect a coax wire for
    > > extending
    > > the antenna?

    >
    > > --
    > > regards,

    >
    > > |\ /|
    > > | \/ |@rk
    > > \../
    > > \/os

    >
    > ---------------start quote
    > There are serveral "coax" style connectors but these are not to be
    > confused with the coax RG-5x style connectors.
    >
    > Serveral known "wireless" connectors:
    >
    > R-SNA
    > N-Type
    > TNA
    > -------------end quote
    >
    > And I suppose it must have the correct impedance (ohms). E.g. for TV is must
    > be 75 Ohms.
    > I was asking in the first place, because moving the router itself would
    > involve extending many cables. If I could move only the radiating element
    > (rod antenna) it would be more practical. But of course I don't want to
    > loose power due to mismatches...
    >
    > I also tried another approach: parabolic reflector on the rod, but the
    > results were not very succesful.
    >
    > --
    > regards,
    >
    > |\  /|
    > | \/ |@rk
    >  \../
    >   \/os- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Not sure what router you have. Check the specs off the maker's tech
    support web site. Some makers sell enhanced antennas which are in two
    basic categories: directional and omni-directional. Directional
    antennas are antenna which are "aimed" to the location the client
    device is located. Omni-directional ones generally creates a "bubble"
    around the router. The included rod antenna is an omni-directional
    one.

    Also, if you are going to add different maker's antenna or make one,
    you need to use corresponding connectors and correctly rated cables.
    smlunatick, Apr 16, 2008
    #15
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