Digital Projection Scanning Resolution

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ian, Aug 16, 2005.

  1. ian

    ian Guest

    "Michael" <> wrote in message
    news:ddsbok$42k$...
    >I would like to know if there is an "optimum" resolution that
    >transparencies
    > and photos should be scanned, in order to use the files for digital
    > projection.
    >
    > Thank You


    What is the resolution of the projector?
    ian, Aug 16, 2005
    #1
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  2. ian

    Mike Warren Guest

    Michael wrote:
    > "ian" <> wrote in message
    > news:ddsem7$bk7$...
    >> "Michael" <> wrote in message
    >> news:ddsbok$42k$...
    >>> I would like to know if there is an "optimum" resolution that
    >>> transparencies
    >>> and photos should be scanned, in order to use the files for digital
    >>> projection.
    >>>
    >>> Thank You

    >>
    >> What is the resolution of the projector?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I'm looking to buy one, that's why I'm asking that question. Is there
    > a relation between the projector resolution and the resolution of the
    > scanned transparency?


    The best resolution is the native one for the projector as long as the
    video output from the computer matches.

    -Mike
    Mike Warren, Aug 16, 2005
    #2
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  3. ian

    Mike Warren Guest

    Mike Warren wrote:
    > Michael wrote:
    >> "ian" <> wrote in message
    >> news:ddsem7$bk7$...
    >>> "Michael" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:ddsbok$42k$...
    >>>> I would like to know if there is an "optimum" resolution that
    >>>> transparencies
    >>>> and photos should be scanned, in order to use the files for
    >>>> digital projection.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thank You
    >>>
    >>> What is the resolution of the projector?
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> I'm looking to buy one, that's why I'm asking that question. Is there
    >> a relation between the projector resolution and the resolution of the
    >> scanned transparency?

    >
    > The best resolution is the native one for the projector as long as the
    > video output from the computer matches.


    I should add: It's not the resolution (as in DPI) you need to worry about
    but the actual size of the image files. eg: 800x600 or 1024x768 etc.

    The cleanest picture is produced when no scaling needs to be done.

    -Mike
    Mike Warren, Aug 16, 2005
    #3
  4. ian

    Mark² Guest

    "Michael" <> wrote in message
    news:ddsf1u$im2$...
    >
    > "ian" <> wrote in message
    > news:ddsem7$bk7$...
    >> "Michael" <> wrote in message
    >> news:ddsbok$42k$...
    >> >I would like to know if there is an "optimum" resolution that
    >> >transparencies
    >> > and photos should be scanned, in order to use the files for digital
    >> > projection.
    >> >
    >> > Thank You

    >>
    >> What is the resolution of the projector?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I'm looking to buy one, that's why I'm asking that question. Is there a
    > relation between the projector resolution and the resolution of the
    > scanned
    > transparency?


    No.
    If you have a decent photo-viewer program, it will render the image to
    whatever your screen/projector res is set to.

    To the contrary... when I show images on a digital projector, I find it
    extemely useful to be able to instantly zoom in on portions of an image.
    This is great for examining things closely--especially when viewing images
    for discussion.

    ACDSee from acdsystms has a great facility for this sort of zooming.
    You simply drag a box around the portion you wish to see...click teh box,
    and boing!
    -It zooms that portion to full screen size.
    **If you've only scanned at the screen resolution, then this zooming will do
    nothing but look like pixelated garbage. But if you've scanned at high
    resolution, you'll be amazed at what great detail you'll enjoy zooming in
    on.

    -Mark
    Mark², Aug 16, 2005
    #4
  5. ian

    Mark² Guest

    "Mike Warren" <> wrote in
    message news:4301cc80$0$82549$...
    > Mike Warren wrote:
    >> Michael wrote:
    >>> "ian" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:ddsem7$bk7$...
    >>>> "Michael" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:ddsbok$42k$...
    >>>>> I would like to know if there is an "optimum" resolution that
    >>>>> transparencies
    >>>>> and photos should be scanned, in order to use the files for
    >>>>> digital projection.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thank You
    >>>>
    >>>> What is the resolution of the projector?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I'm looking to buy one, that's why I'm asking that question. Is there
    >>> a relation between the projector resolution and the resolution of the
    >>> scanned transparency?

    >>
    >> The best resolution is the native one for the projector as long as the
    >> video output from the computer matches.

    >
    > I should add: It's not the resolution (as in DPI) you need to worry about
    > but the actual size of the image files. eg: 800x600 or 1024x768 etc.
    >
    > The cleanest picture is produced when no scaling needs to be done.


    I do not agree with that, assuming you've got a photo viewer with good
    algos.
    The only time the image breaks down is when your computer is sending a
    SCREEN resolution to the projector that is not the projector's native
    resolution. This has nothing to do with the resolution of the actual image
    file. See my other post in this thread outlining reasons to scan in high
    resolution despite low res projectors.
    Mark², Aug 16, 2005
    #5
  6. ian

    Mark² Guest

    "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    news:B_kMe.2422$ct5.1151@fed1read04...
    >
    > "Mike Warren" <> wrote in
    > message news:4301cc80$0$82549$...
    >> Mike Warren wrote:
    >>> Michael wrote:
    >>>> "ian" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:ddsem7$bk7$...
    >>>>> "Michael" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:ddsbok$42k$...
    >>>>>> I would like to know if there is an "optimum" resolution that
    >>>>>> transparencies
    >>>>>> and photos should be scanned, in order to use the files for
    >>>>>> digital projection.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thank You
    >>>>>
    >>>>> What is the resolution of the projector?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm looking to buy one, that's why I'm asking that question. Is there
    >>>> a relation between the projector resolution and the resolution of the
    >>>> scanned transparency?
    >>>
    >>> The best resolution is the native one for the projector as long as the
    >>> video output from the computer matches.

    >>
    >> I should add: It's not the resolution (as in DPI) you need to worry about
    >> but the actual size of the image files. eg: 800x600 or 1024x768 etc.
    >>
    >> The cleanest picture is produced when no scaling needs to be done.

    >
    > I do not agree with that, assuming you've got a photo viewer with good
    > algos.
    > The only time the image breaks down is when your computer is sending a
    > SCREEN resolution to the projector that is not the projector's native
    > resolution. This has nothing to do with the resolution of the actual
    > image file. See my other post in this thread outlining reasons to scan in
    > high resolution despite low res projectors.


    Here's another way to get your head around the issue:
    Do you only get quality renders on your regular computer CRT or LCD when the
    image file matches the screen? No, you get good renders regardless. The
    only time you don't is with an LCD (or projector) that isn't running in it's
    native res. But again--this has no relation to the image file's resolution.
    Otherwise, people working in Photoshop would never get a good view of their
    images unless they shot pictures at extremely (comparatively speaking) low
    res! -That's just not the way it works, thank goodness.

    Mark
    Mark², Aug 16, 2005
    #6
  7. ian

    Mike Warren Guest

    Mark² wrote:
    >> The cleanest picture is produced when no scaling needs to be done.

    >
    > I do not agree with that, assuming you've got a photo viewer with good
    > algos.
    > The only time the image breaks down is when your computer is sending a
    > SCREEN resolution to the projector that is not the projector's native
    > resolution. This has nothing to do with the resolution of the actual
    > image file. See my other post in this thread outlining reasons to
    > scan in high resolution despite low res projectors.


    Yes, as long as the software does bicubic scaling and the computer
    is fast enough not to cause anoying delays.

    -Mike
    Mike Warren, Aug 16, 2005
    #7
  8. ian

    Mark² Guest

    "Mike Warren" <> wrote in
    message news:4301dd1a$0$47203$...
    > Mark² wrote:
    >>> The cleanest picture is produced when no scaling needs to be done.

    >>
    >> I do not agree with that, assuming you've got a photo viewer with good
    >> algos.
    >> The only time the image breaks down is when your computer is sending a
    >> SCREEN resolution to the projector that is not the projector's native
    >> resolution. This has nothing to do with the resolution of the actual
    >> image file. See my other post in this thread outlining reasons to
    >> scan in high resolution despite low res projectors.

    >
    > Yes, as long as the software does bicubic scaling and the computer
    > is fast enough not to cause anoying delays.


    Any computer less than 3 or 4 years old should have no problem with that.

    Older ones will probably do fine too, since the projector requires such low
    res native input.
    The real key is simply having a decent viewer program.
    I highly recommend ACDSee (www.acdsystems.com)
    They have a free, fully functional demo version...
    Others will recommend the fully free viewers like IrfanView. I don't care
    for it, but many do.
    Mark², Aug 16, 2005
    #8
  9. ian

    Marvin Guest

    Michael wrote:
    > I would like to know if there is an "optimum" resolution that transparencies
    > and photos should be scanned, in order to use the files for digital
    > projection.
    >
    > Thank You
    >
    >

    Other responses have pointed to the native resolution of the projector as a guide. You
    should also keep in mind the purpose of projetcing the image. If it is for a talk, you
    need to keep the amount of material in the image small enough to easily comprehend while
    you are talking. You don't need a lot of resoluton ot meet thta objective; 1024 X 768
    pixels works well for legible letters of a large enough size. If a picture has detail you
    wnat to show, first display the whole image, then the detail separately.
    Marvin, Aug 16, 2005
    #9
  10. ian

    Michael Guest

    I would like to know if there is an "optimum" resolution that transparencies
    and photos should be scanned, in order to use the files for digital
    projection.

    Thank You
    Michael, Aug 16, 2005
    #10
  11. ian

    Michael Guest

    "ian" <> wrote in message
    news:ddsem7$bk7$...
    > "Michael" <> wrote in message
    > news:ddsbok$42k$...
    > >I would like to know if there is an "optimum" resolution that
    > >transparencies
    > > and photos should be scanned, in order to use the files for digital
    > > projection.
    > >
    > > Thank You

    >
    > What is the resolution of the projector?
    >
    >


    I'm looking to buy one, that's why I'm asking that question. Is there a
    relation between the projector resolution and the resolution of the scanned
    transparency?
    Michael, Aug 16, 2005
    #11
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