digital newbie...shutter lag ?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by mookytc@yahoo.com, Apr 11, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.

    Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    quicker?

    Thanks in advance...

    DC
     
    , Apr 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. cjcampbell Guest

    wrote:
    > Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    > upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    > quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    > button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    > capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.
    >
    > Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    > change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    > quicker?


    All digital cameras that are not SLRs are like this, but some have a
    much shorter delay than others. One big reason the digital SLRs do not
    have a delay is that they do not use the LCD screen to preview your
    picture. You have to use the viewfinder, just like an old-fashioned
    film camera. There are some DSLRs who now have digital preview, but if
    they do not have a delay like other digital cameras it is only because
    they are using a separate sensor for display.

    There are two reasons for the delay. The first is because it takes time
    to acquire, process, and display an image on the LCD. You can see this
    delay very clearly by simply waving your hand in front of the camera
    with the screen on.

    The second cause of the delay is that the sensor must shut off and then
    restart to take a picture. It is switching from displaying an image on
    the LCD to using the sensor to capture an image. This also takes time.

    There are a number of ways of dealing with the problem (mainly lots of
    practice), but ultimately if you want to take fast action pictures you
    will have to migrate to a DSLR.
     
    cjcampbell, Apr 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    On 10 Apr 2006 18:30:39 -0700, wrote:

    >Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    >upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    >quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    >button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    >capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.
    >
    >Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    >change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    >quicker?
    >
    >Thanks in advance...
    >
    >DC


    Read the manual..........Prefocus to reduce the shutter lag.
    You should be able to get the lag down to 1/10 of a second.
    The newer cameras are getting quicker and quicker all the time.
     
    , Apr 11, 2006
    #3
  4. Guest

    thanks all...
     
    , Apr 11, 2006
    #4
  5. wrote:
    > On 10 Apr 2006 18:30:39 -0700, wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    >>upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    >>quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    >>button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    >>capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.
    >>
    >>Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    >>change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    >>quicker?
    >>
    >>Thanks in advance...
    >>
    >>DC

    >
    >
    > Read the manual..........Prefocus to reduce the shutter lag.
    > You should be able to get the lag down to 1/10 of a second.
    > The newer cameras are getting quicker and quicker all the time.


    Also, consider setting your camera to take multiple pictures when you
    press the shutter (I can take multiple pictures per second, if needed).
    That way you can pick the best one. I had this on my Minolta Maxxum SLR
    (not digital) and would never give it up (especially when I don't have
    to pay a photo processing charge).

    That's how I was able to get this shot:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrywallis/126719668/

    --
    - Barry
     
    Barry L. Wallis, Apr 11, 2006
    #5
  6. m Ransley Guest

    My sony w5 has a constant focus mode it helps, delay is less than a
    second. New models have even less, Check out reviews or cameras 2
    seconds is long but some new models are around 1/3rd a second.
     
    m Ransley, Apr 11, 2006
    #6
  7. Tony Cooper Guest

    On 10 Apr 2006 18:30:39 -0700, wrote:

    >Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    >upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    >quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    >button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    >capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.
    >
    >Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    >change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    >quicker?


    It's always interesting to read a post like this and then compare it
    to the reviews. The Steve's DigiCams review says:

    "Olympus’ exclusive TruePic TURBO™ Image Processor enhances image
    quality and delivers faster overall processing speeds for rapid
    startup, shutter release and playback. TruePic TURBOTM enables the
    Stylus 810 to capture information from all 8.0 million pixels with
    pixel “micro-smoothing” that delivers clearer and more color-accurate
    photos, even at lower resolutions. The fast startup of less than one
    second and nearly instant shutter release time ensures a high-speed
    response so you are always ready to take great pictures."

    That aside, does the camera have a "burst" mode or a multiple image
    mode? It doesn't help with the first picture, but it increases your
    chances of getting one good capture with a moving subject.



    --


    Tony Cooper
    Orlando, FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Apr 11, 2006
    #7
  8. Ron Hunter Guest

    wrote:
    > Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    > upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    > quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    > button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    > capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.
    >
    > Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    > change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    > quicker?
    >
    > Thanks in advance...
    >
    > DC
    >

    Most inexpensive digital cameras experience some perceptible shutter
    lag. Generally, newer, and more expensive ones have shorter lags. Some
    of the P&S cameras in the $300 price range have suitably short lags in
    the range of DSLRs. Check out the reviews online for specifics.
     
    Ron Hunter, Apr 11, 2006
    #8
  9. J. Clarke Guest

    wrote:

    > Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    > upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    > quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    > button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    > capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.
    >
    > Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    > change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    > quicker?
    >
    > Thanks in advance...


    If you press the shutter slowly you may feel a detent about halfway down.
    That should set the focus and whatnot and have the camera ready to shoot.
    >
    > DC


    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Apr 11, 2006
    #9
  10. y_p_w Guest

    cjcampbell wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    > > upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    > > quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    > > button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    > > capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.
    > >
    > > Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    > > change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    > > quicker?

    >
    > There are two reasons for the delay. The first is because it takes time
    > to acquire, process, and display an image on the LCD. You can see this
    > delay very clearly by simply waving your hand in front of the camera
    > with the screen on.


    LCD has almost nothing to do with it. The vast majority of shutter
    lag is from autofocus delay. dSLRs simply focus and lock much
    faster than point & shoot consumer digicams. The typical 35mm lens
    will focus almost instantly. My (consumer level) Canon PowerShot S1
    IS has a manual focus mode. With manual focus, after adjusting for
    white balance and calculating shutter speed or aperature, shutter
    delay is almost imperceptable, LCD on or not.

    With autofocus, I can literally see it focusing on the screen if I
    start with the focus way off. "Predictive" focusing can reduce
    the lag sometimes. Even compact 35mm autofocus cameras have
    a perceptible shutter delay.

    > The second cause of the delay is that the sensor must shut off and then
    > restart to take a picture. It is switching from displaying an image on
    > the LCD to using the sensor to capture an image. This also takes time.


    The time it takes to shut off the LCD and charge the sensor for the
    picture is almost inperceptible. Again - with manual focus on, it's
    almost instant on my consumer camera.

    > There are a number of ways of dealing with the problem (mainly lots of
    > practice), but ultimately if you want to take fast action pictures you
    > will have to migrate to a DSLR.


    That would be correct.
     
    y_p_w, Apr 11, 2006
    #10
  11. y_p_w Guest

    Barry L. Wallis wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > On 10 Apr 2006 18:30:39 -0700, wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    > >>upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    > >>quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    > >>button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    > >>capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.
    > >>
    > >>Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    > >>change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    > >>quicker?
    > >>
    > >>Thanks in advance...
    > >>
    > >>DC

    > >
    > >
    > > Read the manual..........Prefocus to reduce the shutter lag.
    > > You should be able to get the lag down to 1/10 of a second.
    > > The newer cameras are getting quicker and quicker all the time.

    >
    > Also, consider setting your camera to take multiple pictures when you
    > press the shutter (I can take multiple pictures per second, if needed).
    > That way you can pick the best one. I had this on my Minolta Maxxum SLR
    > (not digital) and would never give it up (especially when I don't have
    > to pay a photo processing charge).
    >
    > That's how I was able to get this shot:
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrywallis/126719668/


    While I do use such a mode, I find that sometimes it will give
    priority to getting the shot over focus accuracy. I've bursted
    12 shots for a group picture (Hey! You blinked.) and sometimes
    the lens moves slightly in and out of focus.
     
    y_p_w, Apr 11, 2006
    #11
  12. y_p_w wrote:
    > Barry L. Wallis wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 10 Apr 2006 18:30:39 -0700, wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Hi all..newbie here. We purchased an olympus 810 digital camera for an
    >>>>upcoming vacation. While playing around last night we noticed on some
    >>>>quick shots (1,2,3 cheese) there was lag time after pressing the
    >>>>button to shoot the picture. Thus missing the image we wanted to
    >>>>capture. We were like 2 seconds behind real time.
    >>>>
    >>>>Are all digital cameras like this? I didn't think so. Anything we can
    >>>>change in the settings or maybe a different model would respond
    >>>>quicker?
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks in advance...
    >>>>
    >>>>DC
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Read the manual..........Prefocus to reduce the shutter lag.
    >>>You should be able to get the lag down to 1/10 of a second.
    >>>The newer cameras are getting quicker and quicker all the time.

    >>
    >>Also, consider setting your camera to take multiple pictures when you
    >>press the shutter (I can take multiple pictures per second, if needed).
    >>That way you can pick the best one. I had this on my Minolta Maxxum SLR
    >>(not digital) and would never give it up (especially when I don't have
    >>to pay a photo processing charge).
    >>
    >>That's how I was able to get this shot:
    >>http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrywallis/126719668/

    >
    >
    > While I do use such a mode, I find that sometimes it will give
    > priority to getting the shot over focus accuracy. I've bursted
    > 12 shots for a group picture (Hey! You blinked.) and sometimes
    > the lens moves slightly in and out of focus.


    That's one problem I haven't had yet. The photo referenced above was
    taken with an ancient 1mp Casio QV-8000. If there was a focusing problem
    it would have been obvious as the coaster approached me and there didn't
    seem to be any problems. I haven't tried this same shot with my current
    Coolpix 8800, but it's on my list the next time I go to Disney's
    California Adventure (probably in a few weeks).

    --
    - Barry
     
    Barry L. Wallis, Apr 12, 2006
    #12
  13. Guest

    good advice...thanks for not flaming all. Like I said newb to digital
    cameras. This got us started and now we can play while we go through
    the manual.

    Thanks again...

    DC
     
    , Apr 12, 2006
    #13
  14. TheBreeze Guest

    "y_p_w" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > LCD has almost nothing to do with it. The vast majority of shutter
    > lag is from autofocus delay. dSLRs simply focus and lock much
    > faster than point & shoot consumer digicams. The typical 35mm lens
    > will focus almost instantly. My (consumer level) Canon PowerShot S1
    > IS has a manual focus mode. With manual focus, after adjusting for
    > white balance and calculating shutter speed or aperature, shutter
    > delay is almost imperceptable, LCD on or not.


    This is what I discovered. If I focus on the area I want, then change to
    manual focus from auto, there was no lag. I learned that in time for
    wrestling season...wish I'd known during last year's track season for
    shooting high jumps (but I did get good at anticipating the moment of jump
    by sighting with one eye and keeping the other open to track the jumper's
    approach).
     
    TheBreeze, Apr 12, 2006
    #14
  15. Hi DC

    1) Shutter lag is inherent in all digital cameras (more so in some than
    others). The higher end models tend to have very good response though.

    2) The problem with shutter lag is that it hits you with a delay in
    capturing the image. What I usually is to use the self timer instead -
    especially if I'm using a low-end camera.

    3) The other thing you can try of course, is to use a tripod. The
    tripod is one of the most underused photographic peices of equipment in
    the market - especially by newbies.

    If you are interested in finding out more about taking good photos, be
    sure to check out this link:

    http://www.basic-digital-photography.com/shooting-photos.html

    Best Regards
    Gary Hendricks
    http://www.basic-digital-photography.com
     
    Gary Hendricks, Apr 13, 2006
    #15
  16. MB Guest

    Shutter lag of the Olympus 800 is 7/10 of a second. I don't have data on
    the 810.

    Shutter lag is of primary importance when you're deciding which camera to
    buy. If you're going to be photographing buildings or landscapes, sl can be
    as high as 7/10 or even longer (some cameras have sl of 1 second!). If
    children or animals--anything moving--are your subjects, you should buy a
    camera with a much shorter sl. You have to do a bit of research of the
    tests to find out what the sl of the one or other camera is.

    I like Olympus very much-- my first DC was an Olympus P&S. Shutter lag of
    the P&S cameras is Olympus's greatest weakness, though.
     
    MB, Apr 14, 2006
    #16
  17. Beck Guest

    "MB" <> wrote in message
    news:e1nhuq$m0k$00$-online.com...
    > Shutter lag of the Olympus 800 is 7/10 of a second. I don't have data on
    > the 810.
    >
    > Shutter lag is of primary importance when you're deciding which camera to
    > buy. If you're going to be photographing buildings or landscapes, sl can
    > be as high as 7/10 or even longer (some cameras have sl of 1 second!). If
    > children or animals--anything moving--are your subjects, you should buy a
    > camera with a much shorter sl. You have to do a bit of research of the
    > tests to find out what the sl of the one or other camera is.
    >
    > I like Olympus very much-- my first DC was an Olympus P&S. Shutter lag of
    > the P&S cameras is Olympus's greatest weakness, though.


    I agree about the shutter lag on some Olympus. I had the C720 which was a
    fine camera and took great pictures (imo) but the shutter lag was dire. The
    activity would be gone before I could capture it.
     
    Beck, Apr 14, 2006
    #17
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