Digital ID and encrypted.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Geopelia, Jul 9, 2007.

  1. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    I tried to reply to an email, and was told I didn't have a digital ID and it
    wasn't encrypted.

    What are they talking about please?

    I've never had that message before with emails.

    Geopelia
     
    Geopelia, Jul 9, 2007
    #1
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  2. In message <f6sdap$jdi$>, Geopelia wrote:

    > I tried to reply to an email, and was told I didn't have a digital ID and
    > it wasn't encrypted.
    >
    > What are they talking about please?


    Who knows. It could be one of these rubbish challenge-response systems. Do
    you have some other way of contacting the person involved?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 9, 2007
    #2
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  3. On Mon, 09 Jul 2007 16:09:11 +1200, Geopelia wrote:

    > I tried to reply to an email, and was told I didn't have a digital ID and it
    > wasn't encrypted.
    >
    > What are they talking about please?
    >
    > I've never had that message before with emails.
    >
    > Geopelia


    There are two main uses of digital ids (or certificates, or keys).
    Encryption and Authentication. And two main families of systems of doing
    this. X.509 which is built in to Thunderbird and Outlook, and OpenPGP
    which usually requires an add on product. Both are based on a
    concept called asymmetric or public key cryptography, and use
    similar algorithms. There's a lot to read about it so I suggest first asking
    the recipient what format they prefer. Most people should have both.

    If you want to learn more I suggest just having a look around google or
    wikipedia but the basics are:

    For encryption only theoretically only the recipients public key should be
    necessary but most systems require the sender to have a key pair too. Keys
    for this purpose can be obtained free of charge, from a Certificate
    Authority for X.509, and you can make OpenPGP ones yourself.

    Authentication is a little bit more involved, as your identity needs to
    be verified to the key first. For X.509 this involves presenting ID (and
    a small fee) to the CA and for PGP this involves key signing parties.
     
    Kurt Häusler, Jul 9, 2007
    #3
  4. Geopelia

    Richard Guest

    Geopelia wrote:
    > I tried to reply to an email, and was told I didn't have a digital ID and it
    > wasn't encrypted.
    >
    > What are they talking about please?
    >
    > I've never had that message before with emails.
    >
    > Geopelia
    >
    >


    You are replying to an email with a public key in it, and have chosen to
    encrypt it, but since you dont have a key, you cant do it. Unclick
    encrypt on the top of the compose screen and it should send ok.
     
    Richard, Jul 10, 2007
    #4
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