Digital color balance and SCUBA diving

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Gerald, Mar 23, 2005.

  1. Gerald

    Gerald Guest

    Should following a normal "custom" white balance process while at depth
    result in accurate color capture? Any special considerations?
    Gerald, Mar 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. Gerald

    Rudy Benner Guest

    "Gerald" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Should following a normal "custom" white balance process while at depth
    > result in accurate color capture? Any special considerations?
    >


    Adobe Photoshop will do a fairly good job of restoring what looks like
    'normal' colour balance, its an approximation at best. You can make a grey
    card for underwater use, this will improve the situation a bit. A strobe is
    good for close work.

    Email me offline for a sample of what Photoshop can do.
    Rudy Benner, Mar 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. >Should following a normal "custom" white balance process while at depth
    >result in accurate color capture? Any special considerations?


    Actually, white-balance adjustments are designed specifically not to
    give you accurate color capture, but rather to make the photo look
    most like what the eye sees.

    The eye (along with the mind) automatically converts most off-white
    ambient light to white, so even in a large range of settings, white
    looks white.

    Film and digital sensors don't do this conversion automatically, so
    they have to be set according to the lighting. Normally, this is a
    good thing, but in caes of extreme lighting (sunsets, under water) you
    don't want the lighting to look the same as it would it ordinary
    daylight.


    I would recommend shooting in RAW mode (if you can) and adjsuting
    things later. Or if you cannot, shoow in a variety of WB settings.

    -Joel

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Free 35mm lens/digicam reviews: http://www.exc.com/photography
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Dr. Joel M. Hoffman, Mar 23, 2005
    #3
  4. Gerald

    Guest

    Dr. Joel M. Hoffman <> wrote:
    : I would recommend shooting in RAW mode (if you can) and adjsuting
    : things later. Or if you cannot, shoow in a variety of WB settings.

    ... and still take a shot of a white/grey card to aid in the RAW conversion
    later.

    -Cory

    *************************************************************************
    * Cory Papenfuss *
    * Electrical Engineering candidate Ph.D. graduate student *
    * Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University *
    *************************************************************************
    , Mar 23, 2005
    #4
  5. Gerald

    bmoag Guest

    My recent experience in Hawaii:
    Even in depths of just 10meters red light is fairly well filtered out by the
    water as far as digital cameras are concerned. Using flash underwater is
    often a problem as waterborne particles reflect the light back at the
    camera. Post exposure color correction helps but the color effect is rather
    unrealistic but better than nothing.
    bmoag, Mar 24, 2005
    #5
  6. Gerald

    Dan Birchall Guest

    (bmoag) wrote:
    > My recent experience in Hawaii:
    > Even in depths of just 10meters red light is fairly well filtered out
    > by the water as far as digital cameras are concerned.


    Yep. Actually, I'd say that's true at even shallower depths - I do a
    lot of skindiving with a digital, and there's a lot of blue/green.

    > Using flash underwater is often a problem as waterborne particles
    > reflect the light back at the camera.


    Yep. "Backscatter." How much of a problem it is varies depending on
    recent weather patterns (rain will cause runoff), time of day (morning
    is clearer, before everyone gets to the beach) and how still the water
    is, among other things.

    > Post exposure color correction helps but the color effect is rather
    > unrealistic but better than nothing.


    Yep. Between haze at the volcano and lack of red light underwater,
    I've gotten a lot of practice with correction. ;)

    --
    Dan Birchall, Hilo HI - http://hilom.multiply.com/ - images, words, technology
    Dan Birchall, Mar 24, 2005
    #6
  7. Gerald

    Pete S. Guest

    On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 02:13:31 -0000,
    (Dan Birchall) wrote:

    > (bmoag) wrote:
    >> My recent experience in Hawaii:
    >> Even in depths of just 10meters red light is fairly well filtered out
    >> by the water as far as digital cameras are concerned.

    >
    >Yep. Actually, I'd say that's true at even shallower depths - I do a
    >lot of skindiving with a digital, and there's a lot of blue/green.
    >

    There actually isn't enough red light to get a colour balance. Shoot
    RAW.

    >> Using flash underwater is often a problem as waterborne particles
    >> reflect the light back at the camera.

    >
    >Yep. "Backscatter." How much of a problem it is varies depending on
    >recent weather patterns (rain will cause runoff), time of day (morning
    >is clearer, before everyone gets to the beach) and how still the water
    >is, among other things.


    Move the strobe a long way from the camera, and in extreme cases, well
    behind the camera. Shooting mantas with a 10.5mm lens I have the
    strobe about 18" behind and about 4' away from the lens centre.
    Further is better!!

    Pete S.
    Pete S., Mar 24, 2005
    #7
  8. Gerald

    Ken Tough Guest

    bmoag <> wrote:

    >My recent experience in Hawaii:
    >Even in depths of just 10meters red light is fairly well filtered out by the
    >water as far as digital cameras are concerned. Using flash underwater is
    >often a problem as waterborne particles reflect the light back at the
    >camera. Post exposure color correction helps but the color effect is rather
    >unrealistic but better than nothing.


    A dive light (waterproof flashlight) can help too, since you can
    illuminate your subject from well off the camera's axis, and it
    will give some red light to the scene.
    --
    Ken Tough
    Ken Tough, Mar 24, 2005
    #8
  9. Gerald

    Dan Birchall Guest

    fake@ (Pete S.) wrote:
    > (Dan Birchall) wrote:
    > > (bmoag) wrote:
    > >> Using flash underwater is often a problem as waterborne particles
    > >> reflect the light back at the camera.

    > >
    > >Yep. "Backscatter." How much of a problem it is varies depending on
    > >recent weather patterns (rain will cause runoff), time of day (morning
    > >is clearer, before everyone gets to the beach) and how still the water
    > >is, among other things.

    >
    > Move the strobe a long way from the camera, and in extreme cases, well
    > behind the camera. Shooting mantas with a 10.5mm lens I have the
    > strobe about 18" behind and about 4' away from the lens centre.
    > Further is better!!


    Agreed! Backscatter is worst when the flash is near the axis of
    the lens. When I'm skindiving with a compact camera, I try to avoid
    using the flash at all for this reason - the flash is an inch or two
    from the lens axis.

    Someday I'll be able to afford a nice housing with the external strobes
    and all that good stuff.

    --
    Dan Birchall, Hilo HI - http://hilom.multiply.com/ - images, words, technology
    Dan Birchall, Mar 27, 2005
    #9
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