Digital capture / Time-lapse video recording of Art using Samsung SL202

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by reeves_fine_arts@yahoo.com, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. Guest

    Digital capture /time-lapse recording of arcylic paintings
    Greetings,

    Could someone help me with simple instructions to shoot an acrylic
    original painting using a Samsung 10.2 MP (model SL202 if that
    matters?) The purpose is to e-mail a customer how their painting is
    coming up, not for production quality reprint (which I take to a
    professional photographer).

    I have had two challenges that mars the picture:

    1. The square frame seems oblongated towards the sides (like the pics
    you get from cell phone capture)

    2. The acrylic paint surface creates a diffused glare -- this is
    especially true if I finish the painting with matt or gloss varnish to
    seal the painting.

    Also looking for instructions to record a time lapse of unfolding art
    in progress using the video capture feature on the same camera, video
    editing software etc.

    Thanks in advance!

    Uma Sundaram
    reeves_fine_arts@[nospam]yahoo.com
     
    , Feb 12, 2012
    #1
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  2. In rec.photo.digital wrote:
    > Digital capture /time-lapse recording of arcylic paintings
    > Greetings,


    > Could someone help me with simple instructions to shoot an acrylic
    > original painting using a Samsung 10.2 MP (model SL202 if that
    > matters?) The purpose is to e-mail a customer how their painting is
    > coming up, not for production quality reprint (which I take to a
    > professional photographer).


    > I have had two challenges that mars the picture:


    > 1. The square frame seems oblongated towards the sides (like the pics
    > you get from cell phone capture)


    This effect may lessen as you increase focal length of the lens. There
    may also be a "sweet spot" in the zoom where it is absent. If not and
    it really matters a good editor should be able to at least reduce the
    effect a lot. The tech term is removing pincushion distortion. There
    may be a specialised program which can do that perfectly for your
    particualar camera/lens combination, i.e. correct lens geometric
    distortions.

    > 2. The acrylic paint surface creates a diffused glare -- this is
    > especially true if I finish the painting with matt or gloss varnish to
    > seal the painting.


    Try lighting it from a 45 degree angle from two sides. Try extremely
    diffuse lighting, such as light reflected from while ceiling and
    walls.

    --
    Chris Malcolm
     
    Chris Malcolm, Feb 13, 2012
    #2
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  3. writes:

    > Digital capture /time-lapse recording of arcylic paintings
    > Greetings,
    >
    > Could someone help me with simple instructions to shoot an acrylic
    > original painting using a Samsung 10.2 MP (model SL202 if that
    > matters?) The purpose is to e-mail a customer how their painting is
    > coming up, not for production quality reprint (which I take to a
    > professional photographer).
    >
    > I have had two challenges that mars the picture:
    >
    > 1. The square frame seems oblongated towards the sides (like the pics
    > you get from cell phone capture)


    I'm not at all sure I understand this description. Do you mean that
    "straight" lines towards the edges of the frame bow outwards? (If so,
    the term of art is "barrel distortion"; the opposite, where they bow in,
    is "pincushion distortion".)

    Try different zoom settings; the degree of such distortion in most zoom
    lenses varies with the focal length. There's likely to be some length
    at which it doesn't have much of any.

    Alternatively, it can be corrected in software. Photoshop (perhaps
    Elements too), PTLens, many others. (Look for "lens correction" and
    "barrel", if nothing comes up that program may well not handle it.)

    > 2. The acrylic paint surface creates a diffused glare -- this is
    > especially true if I finish the painting with matt or gloss varnish to
    > seal the painting.


    Any surface has a range of angles in which it gives specular reflections
    (glarey-type reflections). If the surface is reasonably flat, just
    arrange that the lighting is at angles to the camera where it doesn't
    glare at the camera (this may require covering windows, etc.). If the
    surface is very uneven with bits facing every which way, this is much
    harder, but you describe a kind of overall glare, which suggests a
    flatter surface. And what I know of acryllic painting tends towards a
    flatter surface (than modern uses of oils for example).

    Yeah, if you plan to take frequent, even constant, pictures documenting
    the creation of the painting, it would be a real total pain to have to
    mess with the lighting for each picture. Sorry about that. I don't
    know any magic way to make glare go away. Well, except the following:

    A more drastic approach, and I suspect even less useful for the
    documentary purpose you describe, is to light the artwork only with two
    lights, out to the sides at 45 degrees to the surface, each equipped
    with a polarizing filter, oriented the same way. Then put a polarizing
    filter on the lens of the camera, oriented to block the glares from the
    polarized light. The diffuse reflection will not be polarized and will
    get through.

    (Skipping the video question, no good answer here.)
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Feb 13, 2012
    #3
  4. Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> writes:

    > On 2012-02-13 13:31:16 -0800, David Dyer-Bennet <> said:
    >
    >> writes:
    >>
    >>> Digital capture /time-lapse recording of arcylic paintings
    >>> Greetings,
    >>>
    >>> Could someone help me with simple instructions to shoot an acrylic
    >>> original painting using a Samsung 10.2 MP (model SL202 if that
    >>> matters?) The purpose is to e-mail a customer how their painting is
    >>> coming up, not for production quality reprint (which I take to a
    >>> professional photographer).
    >>>
    >>> I have had two challenges that mars the picture:
    >>>
    >>> 1. The square frame seems oblongated towards the sides (like the pics
    >>> you get from cell phone capture)

    >>
    >> I'm not at all sure I understand this description. Do you mean that
    >> "straight" lines towards the edges of the frame bow outwards? (If so,
    >> the term of art is "barrel distortion"; the opposite, where they bow in,
    >> is "pincushion distortion".)

    >
    > I have a feeling that Uma Sundaram is describing is a "Keystone"
    > effect where the top and bottom edges of a rectangular frame are not
    > the same length.
    > < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keystone_effect >


    In which case "keystone" and "perspective correction" are the keywords
    I'd use to find stuff on it.

    Or just arrange to have the camera square to the frame; however, having
    the camera NOT square to the frame may help resolve the glare problem.
    Might be easier to shoot from an angle and correct the perspective
    later.

    Problems tend to interact; sigh.

    > This can be corrected with the lens correction filter in Photoshop,
    > adjusting the vertical and/or horizontal perspective. However it might
    > be best to ensure that the camera is positioned center and
    > perpendicular to the subject painting.


    I see great minds are running in the same rut again.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Feb 13, 2012
    #4
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