Digital camera recommendation for gramma

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Top Spin, Nov 12, 2003.

  1. Top Spin

    Top Spin Guest

    I'd like to get my mom a digital camera for Christmas. She's 80. She
    is fairly comfortable with technology. She has a laptop that she uses
    to write letters and she loves to look at the digital photos we upload
    to Ofoto. Nonetheless, the camera will need to be fairly simple to
    use.

    Here are the requirements we think will work:

    * Simplicity -- probably pretty much point and shoot
    * Small enough to carry in a purse
    * Good viewing window for framing the photo
    * Easy link to upload to her PC

    Cost is not a major consideration.

    All recommendations appreciated.

    Thanks

    --
    Using an Olympus C-700 UZ
    Running Win2K SR-1
     
    Top Spin, Nov 12, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Top Spin

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > I'd like to get my mom a digital camera for Christmas. She's 80. She
    > is fairly comfortable with technology. She has a laptop that she uses
    > to write letters and she loves to look at the digital photos we upload
    > to Ofoto. Nonetheless, the camera will need to be fairly simple to
    > use.
    >
    > Here are the requirements we think will work:
    >
    > * Simplicity -- probably pretty much point and shoot
    > * Small enough to carry in a purse
    > * Good viewing window for framing the photo
    > * Easy link to upload to her PC
    >
    > Cost is not a major consideration.
    >
    > All recommendations appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > --
    > Using an Olympus C-700 UZ
    > Running Win2K SR-1
    >


    Any of the Kodak models that use the Easy Share dock are probably going
    to be best. They have very good picture quality and uploading to the
    computer is literally set the camera on the dock and hit a button.

    --
    __________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://www.toddwalker.net
    Canon 10D page:
    http://www.toddwalker.net/canon10d
    __________________________________
     
    Todd Walker, Nov 12, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Top Spin

    Top Spin Guest

    On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 05:34:57 GMT, Todd Walker <>
    wrote:

    >Any of the Kodak models that use the Easy Share dock are probably going
    >to be best. They have very good picture quality and uploading to the
    >computer is literally set the camera on the dock and hit a button.


    She can use a USB cable (or we can teach her how to use it).

    What do you think of the Olympus 300 or 400?

    --
    Using an Olympus C-700 UZ
    Running Win2K SR-1
     
    Top Spin, Nov 12, 2003
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    Top Spin <> wrote:

    > She can use a USB cable (or we can teach her how to use it).
    > What do you think of the Olympus 300 or 400?


    Being an "Olympus person," I believe either would be good.
    Actually, I believe that any clamshell design would be good.
    --
    Charlie Dilks
    Newark, DE USA
     
    Charlie Dilks, Nov 12, 2003
    #4
  5. "Top Spin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'd like to get my mom a digital camera for Christmas. She's 80. She
    > is fairly comfortable with technology. She has a laptop that she uses
    > to write letters and she loves to look at the digital photos we upload
    > to Ofoto. Nonetheless, the camera will need to be fairly simple to
    > use.
    >
    > Here are the requirements we think will work:
    >
    > * Simplicity -- probably pretty much point and shoot
    > * Small enough to carry in a purse
    > * Good viewing window for framing the photo
    > * Easy link to upload to her PC
    >
    > Cost is not a major consideration.
    >
    > All recommendations appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > --
    > Using an Olympus C-700 UZ
    > Running Win2K SR-1


    I suggest one of the Olympus D series cameras. There are smaller cameras
    that would fit into a purse more easily, but older hands can have trouble
    handling them.

    The pictures can be downloaded with a USB cable or a card reader. If
    grandma isn't taking a lot of pictures, long-life lithium batteries might
    suit her better than NiMH batteries that need ot be recharged regularly,
    even if the camera hasn't been used.
     
    Marvin Margoshes, Nov 12, 2003
    #5
  6. Top Spin

    Top Spin Guest

    On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 13:22:17 -0500, "Marvin Margoshes"
    <> wrote:

    >I suggest one of the Olympus D series cameras. There are smaller cameras
    >that would fit into a purse more easily, but older hands can have trouble
    >handling them.
    >
    >The pictures can be downloaded with a USB cable or a card reader. If
    >grandma isn't taking a lot of pictures, long-life lithium batteries might
    >suit her better than NiMH batteries that need ot be recharged regularly,
    >even if the camera hasn't been used.


    The Olympus was also recommended by a friend. We went to the local
    photo store and got talked into the Minolta G500.

    What say ye?

    --
    Using an Olympus C-700 UZ
    Running Win2K SR-1
     
    Top Spin, Nov 13, 2003
    #6
  7. "Top Spin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 13:22:17 -0500, "Marvin Margoshes"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >I suggest one of the Olympus D series cameras. There are smaller cameras
    > >that would fit into a purse more easily, but older hands can have trouble
    > >handling them.
    > >
    > >The pictures can be downloaded with a USB cable or a card reader. If
    > >grandma isn't taking a lot of pictures, long-life lithium batteries might
    > >suit her better than NiMH batteries that need ot be recharged regularly,
    > >even if the camera hasn't been used.

    >
    > The Olympus was also recommended by a friend. We went to the local
    > photo store and got talked into the Minolta G500.


    The G500 is the best option in an ultra-compact. It's actually the Konica
    Revio 510z, which is highly rated in Europe and Asia, but due to Minolta's
    reputation in the U.S., goes for a bargain price. I've seen it as low as
    $315,
    though most stores charge $400 for it. The only downside is the fact that
    it uses SD rather than Compact Flash.

    Personally, I would get a camera with a dock for her. Not only for the lack
    of cabling to deal with, but because it recharges in the dock as well. The
    Kodak DX 6440 would be good. But the G500 is better if she's comfortable
    with the USB cable and the charger cable. I just think of all the calls I
    get
    now for technical support from my mother, and would want to get her
    something very easy to use.

    Steve
    http://nordicgroup.us/digicam/
    Digital Camera Short List
     
    Steven M. Scharf, Nov 13, 2003
    #7
  8. Top Spin

    Top Spin Guest

    On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 06:37:12 GMT, "Steven M. Scharf"
    <> wrote:

    >The G500 is the best option in an ultra-compact. It's actually the Konica
    >Revio 510z, which is highly rated in Europe and Asia, but due to Minolta's
    >reputation in the U.S., goes for a bargain price. I've seen it as low as
    >$315,
    >though most stores charge $400 for it. The only downside is the fact that
    >it uses SD rather than Compact Flash.


    How is that a downside?

    >Personally, I would get a camera with a dock for her. Not only for the lack
    >of cabling to deal with, but because it recharges in the dock as well. The
    >Kodak DX 6440 would be good. But the G500 is better if she's comfortable
    >with the USB cable and the charger cable. I just think of all the calls I
    >get
    >now for technical support from my mother, and would want to get her
    >something very easy to use.


    I think she will be OK with the USB cable. We'll have a week over
    Thanksgiving to train her and she has some techie grandkids close by
    if there are any problems.

    --
    Using an Olympus C-700 UZ
    Running Win2K SR-1
     
    Top Spin, Nov 13, 2003
    #8
  9. Top Spin

    Ben Haas Guest

    Friends don't let friends buy HP JUNK !!!! I replaced my HP with a D
    560 Olympus and it is a great little camera..
    Top Spin <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > I'd like to get my mom a digital camera for Christmas. She's 80. She
    > is fairly comfortable with technology. She has a laptop that she uses
    > to write letters and she loves to look at the digital photos we upload
    > to Ofoto. Nonetheless, the camera will need to be fairly simple to
    > use.
    >
    > Here are the requirements we think will work:
    >
    > * Simplicity -- probably pretty much point and shoot
    > * Small enough to carry in a purse
    > * Good viewing window for framing the photo
    > * Easy link to upload to her PC
    >
    > Cost is not a major consideration.
    >
    > All recommendations appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks
     
    Ben Haas, Nov 13, 2003
    #9
  10. "Top Spin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 06:37:12 GMT, "Steven M. Scharf"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >The G500 is the best option in an ultra-compact. It's actually the Konica
    > >Revio 510z, which is highly rated in Europe and Asia, but due to

    Minolta's
    > >reputation in the U.S., goes for a bargain price. I've seen it as low as
    > >$315,
    > >though most stores charge $400 for it. The only downside is the fact that
    > >it uses SD rather than Compact Flash.

    >
    > How is that a downside?


    SD is more expensive, and doesn't come in as high a capacity as CF. But it's
    a minor issue. A 256MB SD card is $70 at Costco, and that should be more
    than enough.
     
    Steven M. Scharf, Nov 13, 2003
    #10
  11. Top Spin

    Michael Guest

    I think getting someone who's 80 years old a digital camera is nuts.
    The pictures take too much fiddling with, the technology is never
    easy, no matter what anyone says. I'd recommend a nice APS with some
    gift certificates to Ofoto or somewhere. Give her a break. Hell,
    even for folks who are used to using technology, the digiphoto thing
    is still a hassle. It's just too much to ask for someone to have
    their own darkroom -- which is basically what you ahve to do -- when
    all they want to do it take some photos.

    Top Spin <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > I'd like to get my mom a digital camera for Christmas. She's 80. She
    > is fairly comfortable with technology. She has a laptop that she uses
    > to write letters and she loves to look at the digital photos we upload
    > to Ofoto. Nonetheless, the camera will need to be fairly simple to
    > use.
    >
    > Here are the requirements we think will work:
    >
    > * Simplicity -- probably pretty much point and shoot
    > * Small enough to carry in a purse
    > * Good viewing window for framing the photo
    > * Easy link to upload to her PC
    >
    > Cost is not a major consideration.
    >
    > All recommendations appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks
     
    Michael, Nov 13, 2003
    #11
  12. I have a friend who bought her first digital camera in her eighties, is now
    on her third! Don't make any assumptions about what older people can or
    can't do. Some resist digital technology; others love it. My friend loves
    it.
    --
    Catherine Jo Morgan
    Iron & mixed media vessel sculptures
    online artist journal: http://radio.weblogs.com/0120691/

    "Michael" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I think getting someone who's 80 years old a digital camera is nuts.
    > The pictures take too much fiddling with, the technology is never
    > easy, no matter what anyone says.
     
    Catherine Jo Morgan, Nov 14, 2003
    #12
  13. Top Spin

    FredBillie Guest

    << From: (Michael)
    Date: Thu, Nov 13, 2003 11:59 AM
    Message-id: <>

    I think getting someone who's 80 years old a digital camera is nuts.
    The pictures take too much fiddling with, the technology is never
    easy, no matter what anyone says. I'd recommend a nice APS with some
    gift certificates to Ofoto or somewhere. Give her a break. Hell,
    even for folks who are used to using technology, the digiphoto thing
    is still a hassle. It's just too much to ask for someone to have
    their own darkroom -- which is basically what you ahve to do -- when
    all they want to do it take some photos.

    Top Spin <> wrote in message
    news:<>...
    > I'd like to get my mom a digital camera for Christmas. She's 80. She
    > is fairly comfortable with technology. She has a laptop that she uses
    > to write letters and she loves to look at the digital photos we upload
    > to Ofoto. Nonetheless, the camera will need to be fairly simple to
    > use.
    >
    > Here are the requirements we think will work:
    >
    > * Simplicity -- probably pretty much point and shoot
    > * Small enough to carry in a purse
    > * Good viewing window for framing the photo
    > * Easy link to upload to her PC
    >
    > Cost is not a major consideration.
    >
    > All recommendations appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks
    >><BR><BR>

    BullCorn.
     
    FredBillie, Nov 14, 2003
    #13
  14. "FredBillie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > << From: (Michael)
    > Date: Thu, Nov 13, 2003 11:59 AM
    > Message-id: <>
    >
    > I think getting someone who's 80 years old a digital camera is nuts.
    > The pictures take too much fiddling with, the technology is never
    > easy, no matter what anyone says. I'd recommend a nice APS with some
    > gift certificates to Ofoto or somewhere. Give her a break. Hell,
    > even for folks who are used to using technology, the digiphoto thing
    > is still a hassle. It's just too much to ask for someone to have
    > their own darkroom -- which is basically what you ahve to do -- when
    > all they want to do it take some photos.


    Not really true. All photos are essentially digital these days. Film is
    developed then scanned then enhanced before printing. Digital just
    leaves out the developing and scanning steps when a mini-lab prints
    the digital photos.
     
    Steven M. Scharf, Nov 14, 2003
    #14
  15. Top Spin

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Catherine Jo Morgan wrote:

    > I have a friend who bought her first digital camera in her eighties, is now
    > on her third! Don't make any assumptions about what older people can or
    > can't do. Some resist digital technology; others love it. My friend loves
    > it.
    > --
    > Catherine Jo Morgan
    > Iron & mixed media vessel sculptures
    > online artist journal: http://radio.weblogs.com/0120691/
    >
    > "Michael" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>I think getting someone who's 80 years old a digital camera is nuts.
    >>The pictures take too much fiddling with, the technology is never
    >>easy, no matter what anyone says.

    >
    >
    >

    I suspect Michael bought the wrong camera and wants others to be as
    dissatisfied as he is.
     
    Ron Hunter, Nov 14, 2003
    #15
  16. Top Spin

    Ron Hunter Guest

    FredBillie wrote:

    > << From: (Michael)
    > Date: Thu, Nov 13, 2003 11:59 AM
    > Message-id: <>
    >
    > I think getting someone who's 80 years old a digital camera is nuts.
    > The pictures take too much fiddling with, the technology is never
    > easy, no matter what anyone says. I'd recommend a nice APS with some
    > gift certificates to Ofoto or somewhere. Give her a break. Hell,
    > even for folks who are used to using technology, the digiphoto thing
    > is still a hassle. It's just too much to ask for someone to have
    > their own darkroom -- which is basically what you ahve to do -- when
    > all they want to do it take some photos.
    >
    > Top Spin <> wrote in message
    > news:<>...
    >
    >>I'd like to get my mom a digital camera for Christmas. She's 80. She
    >>is fairly comfortable with technology. She has a laptop that she uses
    >>to write letters and she loves to look at the digital photos we upload
    >>to Ofoto. Nonetheless, the camera will need to be fairly simple to
    >>use.
    >>
    >>Here are the requirements we think will work:
    >>
    >>* Simplicity -- probably pretty much point and shoot
    >>* Small enough to carry in a purse
    >>* Good viewing window for framing the photo
    >>* Easy link to upload to her PC
    >>
    >>Cost is not a major consideration.
    >>
    >>All recommendations appreciated.
    >>
    >>Thanks

    >
    > >><BR><BR>

    > BullCorn.


    I think you must have bought a camera much to complex and hard to use
    for you needs, and now are soured on what is really a simple and easy
    technology. My camera is a simple point and shoot and 99% of my shots
    require no post-processing at all. There is no 'fiddling', just push
    the button, and if I want prints, I take the card to Wal-Mart (or Sam's)
    and stick it in the machine, and push a few buttons, and I get the same
    prints, from the same machine as the guys who have 35 mm film. Now what
    is difficult about it?
     
    Ron Hunter, Nov 14, 2003
    #16
  17. Top Spin

    Top Spin Guest

    On 13 Nov 2003 09:59:53 -0800, (Michael)
    wrote:

    >I think getting someone who's 80 years old a digital camera is nuts.
    >The pictures take too much fiddling with, the technology is never
    >easy, no matter what anyone says. I'd recommend a nice APS with some
    >gift certificates to Ofoto or somewhere. Give her a break. Hell,
    >even for folks who are used to using technology, the digiphoto thing
    >is still a hassle. It's just too much to ask for someone to have
    >their own darkroom -- which is basically what you ahve to do -- when
    >all they want to do it take some photos.


    I guess my mom is smarter than yours. Are you related to yours?

    --
    Using an Olympus C-700 UZ
    Running Win2K SR-1
     
    Top Spin, Nov 14, 2003
    #17
  18. Top Spin

    SD Guest

    Michael wrote:

    > I think getting someone who's 80 years old a digital camera is nuts.
    > The pictures take too much fiddling with, the technology is never
    > easy, no matter what anyone says. I'd recommend a nice APS with some
    > gift certificates to Ofoto or somewhere. Give her a break. Hell,
    > even for folks who are used to using technology, the digiphoto thing
    > is still a hassle. It's just too much to ask for someone to have
    > their own darkroom -- which is basically what you ahve to do -- when
    > all they want to do it take some photos.
    >


    I have never had as good photos with a point n shoot film as compared to
    a digital. I almost never do any editing to digital photos. and I can
    click them by the 100s and print whichever ones I want at Walmart/SAMS.
    I can also email them without any effort to scan them.

    What hassel are you talking about exactly? Film is way more hassel. I
    cant see the photos immediately. I have to go develop them. It costs
    money to develop all the time. And the OP mentioned that the camera user
    has a laptop. All you do is plugin the camera and voila you can see and
    backup all the pictures.

    Also with film I cant click 100s of pictures like I can with the
    digital.. I can easily carry an almost unlimited supply of memory as
    compared to film.. plus I got myself a cruzer in which I can put SD
    memory and stick it to the side of the laptop without any drivers/cables
    or power.
     
    SD, Nov 19, 2003
    #18
  19. Top Spin

    BillS Guest

    To get the most out of a digital camera, she would probably need to
    work the photos herself. Unless she is on her computer all the time,
    I would suggest going with a film camera.

    Bill
    ---------------------------------------------
    www.bestbuyflowers.com – finding you the best buys on flowers

    Ron Hunter <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > Catherine Jo Morgan wrote:
    >
    > > I have a friend who bought her first digital camera in her eighties, is now
    > > on her third! Don't make any assumptions about what older people can or
    > > can't do. Some resist digital technology; others love it. My friend loves
    > > it.
    > > --
    > > Catherine Jo Morgan
    > > Iron & mixed media vessel sculptures
    > > online artist journal: http://radio.weblogs.com/0120691/
    > >
    > > "Michael" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >
    > >>I think getting someone who's 80 years old a digital camera is nuts.
    > >>The pictures take too much fiddling with, the technology is never
    > >>easy, no matter what anyone says.

    > >
    > >
    > >

    > I suspect Michael bought the wrong camera and wants others to be as
    > dissatisfied as he is.
     
    BillS, Nov 20, 2003
    #19
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Peter
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    424
    Peter
    Jul 19, 2003
  2. Steve

    Small, simple digital camera recommendation

    Steve, Oct 13, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    507
  3. Carlos Cid

    Recommendation for 1st digital camera

    Carlos Cid, Feb 2, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    437
  4. Bob Flaminio

    Digital Camera for Kids Recommendation

    Bob Flaminio, Feb 4, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    7,181
    Bob Flaminio
    Feb 9, 2004
  5. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,055
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page