Digital 8 to DVD

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Bryan Berguson, Oct 6, 2004.

  1. I have a bunch of digital 8 tapes that I'd like to burn to DVD. What would
    be the preferred method for getting this done? Would you create a file on a
    pc and burn it from there or would I have better luck purchasing DVD
    recorder and playing back through the TV and capturing it that way? I'm
    looking for good quality, ease of use and as fast as I can get it done.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Bryan
    Bryan Berguson, Oct 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. In article <>,
    "Bryan Berguson" <> writes:
    > I have a bunch of digital 8 tapes that I'd like to burn to DVD. What would
    > be the preferred method for getting this done? Would you create a file on a
    > pc and burn it from there or would I have better luck purchasing DVD
    > recorder and playing back through the TV and capturing it that way? I'm
    > looking for good quality, ease of use and as fast as I can get it done.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
    >
    > Bryan


    The simplest method is to get a DVD recorder with a digital input for
    Digital-8 and miniDV camcorders like my Toshiba. I also suggest you
    get one with a hard disk as it is much easier to edit before making
    the DVD.
    David E. Bath, Oct 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. Bryan Berguson

    unclejr Guest

    "Bryan Berguson" <> wrote...
    > I have a bunch of digital 8 tapes that I'd like to burn to DVD. What would
    > be the preferred method for getting this done? Would you create a file on a
    > pc and burn it from there


    No. You would capture in either the AVI or HuffYuv codec, then encode
    to MPEG-2. I've seen the results of on-the-fly MPEG-2 encoding direct
    from the capture, but I was unimpressed by all of the motion
    artifacts.

    > or would I have better luck purchasing DVD
    > recorder and playing back through the TV and capturing it that way?


    That's certainly the easiest way. The DVD recorder will make its own
    menu, which is very basic but functional, and you have your final
    product. You have choices of a variety of constant bitrates, where
    you can fit anywhere from 1 hour to 6 hours (I think that this is the
    upper limit) on a single DVDR.

    > I'm looking for good quality, ease of use and as fast as I can get it done.


    Good quality -- encode to MPEG-2 from a PC capture using variable
    bitrate. Depending upon your experience, this can be a slow process,
    because you will also have to author the DVD with an authoring
    program.

    Ease of use -- the set top DVD recorder. Plug it in and record. Very
    fast process. Quality is actually pretty good for a 2-hour or less
    recording onto a DVDR.

    > Any help would be appreciated.


    Go to:

    http://www.videohelp.com

    After you have mastered that site, then go to:

    http://www.doom9.org

    HTH,

    -Junior
    unclejr, Oct 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Bryan Berguson

    Jan B Guest

    On 6 Oct 2004 17:47:55 -0700, (unclejr) wrote:

    >"Bryan Berguson" <> wrote...
    >> I have a bunch of digital 8 tapes that I'd like to burn to DVD.

    ....
    >> or would I have better luck purchasing DVD
    >> recorder

    ....
    >.... You have choices of a variety of constant bitrates


    Most (at least meny) recorders use varible bit rate (VBR), aiming to
    fit the selected recording time.

    > where
    >you can fit anywhere from 1 hour to 6 hours (I think that this is the
    >upper limit) on a single DVDR.


    Some can even store in worse quality up to 8 hours... Bryan doesn't
    want that anyway. I would stay at 2 hours.

    >> I'm looking for good quality, ease of use and as fast as I can get it done.


    Then, go for a recorder with a suitable input for your camera
    (S-video, or digital?).

    To make some editing possible, either choose a DVD+RW recorder without
    a HDD, or a DVD-R with a HDD.
    Both gives the possibility to trim the recordings (start, end,
    hide/remove some parts etc.)

    With the "-R" system you need the HDD to do the editing.
    With the "+RW" system you need to use +RW discs to have the DVD:s play
    according to the edits on another DVD player.
    Also check the editing features on the model you consider as it
    varies.

    /Jan
    Jan B, Oct 7, 2004
    #4

  5. >
    > The simplest method is to get a DVD recorder with a digital input for
    > Digital-8 and miniDV camcorders like my Toshiba. I also suggest you
    > get one with a hard disk as it is much easier to edit before making
    > the DVD.


    David,

    I wondered about this after I posted my first message. Just bypass the TV
    completely by going from the camera into the recorder. I'm going to check
    into this further. What model Toshiba do you have?

    Thanks to all for you suggestions. Bypassing the computer is what I was
    hoping to do so hopefully that works.

    Bryan
    Bryan Berguson, Oct 7, 2004
    #5
  6. Jan B wrote:

    > On 6 Oct 2004 17:47:55 -0700, (unclejr) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>"Bryan Berguson" <> wrote...
    >>
    >>>I have a bunch of digital 8 tapes that I'd like to burn to DVD.

    >
    > ...
    >
    >>>or would I have better luck purchasing DVD
    >>>recorder

    >
    > ...
    >
    >>.... You have choices of a variety of constant bitrates

    >
    >
    > Most (at least meny) recorders use varible bit rate (VBR), aiming to
    > fit the selected recording time.
    >
    >
    >>where
    >>you can fit anywhere from 1 hour to 6 hours (I think that this is the
    >>upper limit) on a single DVDR.

    >
    >
    > Some can even store in worse quality up to 8 hours... Bryan doesn't
    > want that anyway. I would stay at 2 hours.
    >
    >
    >>>I'm looking for good quality, ease of use and as fast as I can get it done.

    >
    >
    > Then, go for a recorder with a suitable input for your camera
    > (S-video, or digital?).
    >
    > To make some editing possible, either choose a DVD+RW recorder without
    > a HDD, or a DVD-R with a HDD.
    > Both gives the possibility to trim the recordings (start, end,
    > hide/remove some parts etc.)
    >
    > With the "-R" system you need the HDD to do the editing.
    > With the "+RW" system you need to use +RW discs to have the DVD:s play
    > according to the edits on another DVD player.
    > Also check the editing features on the model you consider as it
    > varies.
    >
    > /Jan

    but they are using a single pass manual variable bit rate setting which
    is in no way nearly as good as two pass variable bit rate encoding via
    the likes of TMPGenc.

    but capture, encode, author is a damn site more fiddly.
    Vincent Formosa, Oct 7, 2004
    #6
  7. In article <>,
    "Bryan Berguson" <> writes:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> The simplest method is to get a DVD recorder with a digital input for
    >> Digital-8 and miniDV camcorders like my Toshiba. I also suggest you
    >> get one with a hard disk as it is much easier to edit before making
    >> the DVD.

    >
    > David,
    >
    > I wondered about this after I posted my first message. Just bypass the TV
    > completely by going from the camera into the recorder. I'm going to check
    > into this further. What model Toshiba do you have?


    It's an RD XS32. Other manufacturers make similar models with the
    digital interfaces too. At the time I was shopping it was the least
    expensive one that had the digital and the hard disk.

    > Thanks to all for you suggestions. Bypassing the computer is what I was
    > hoping to do so hopefully that works.


    It works very well, I've copy about 25 tapes so far and made multiple
    DVDs from each so far. Most have been family and vacation videos.
    David E. Bath, Oct 8, 2004
    #7
  8. Bryan Berguson

    Lars Guest

    Use analogue copying :) Involing the PC will make you spend alot of time
    trying to figure things out :(

    "Bryan Berguson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have a bunch of digital 8 tapes that I'd like to burn to DVD. What

    would
    > be the preferred method for getting this done? Would you create a file on

    a
    > pc and burn it from there or would I have better luck purchasing DVD
    > recorder and playing back through the TV and capturing it that way? I'm
    > looking for good quality, ease of use and as fast as I can get it done.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
    >
    > Bryan
    >
    >
    Lars, Oct 13, 2004
    #8
  9. "Lars" <> wrote in message news:<FDfbd.2173$>...
    > Use analogue copying :) Involing the PC will make you spend alot of time
    > trying to figure things out :(
    >

    I can't imagine why you would suggest going analog.

    I am researching my first DVR for three purposes:

    1. Copying family VHS tapes (4 to 20 years old) to DVD.
    2. Copying family Digital8 tapes (new to 4 years old) to DVD.
    3. Recording TV programs from analog cable.

    Given the above, I am restricting my options to boxes with
    both firewire (for dubbing the Digital 8) and time base
    correction (for best recovering the signals from the old VHS).
    I was hoping to stay in the ball park of $400. It
    seems I can satisfy all my criteria but one, with which one
    depending on my choice of model. Here are units I am
    considering:

    1. The JVC MV1S combination DVD burner and VHS deck. Firewire,
    TBC, good MPEG encoding, no hard drive, under $400.
    2. The Panasonic E100 or E95. No VCR, but has firewire, TBC,
    and a 120 Gb hard drive. $650.
    3. The JVC MV30U, DVD burner, VCR, 160Gb HD, $768.

    I have ruled out Toshiba because of the reported black level
    problems. (I am in the US. These don't exist everywhere.)

    I ruled out Pioneer because of reports that they do a poor
    job recording poor quality VHS output.

    Rick
    Rick Matthews, Oct 15, 2004
    #9
  10. Bryan Berguson

    Mike T Guest

    "Rick Matthews" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Lars" <> wrote in message

    news:<FDfbd.2173$>...
    > > Use analogue copying :) Involing the PC will make you spend alot of time
    > > trying to figure things out :(
    > >

    > I can't imagine why you would suggest going analog.
    >
    > I am researching my first DVR for three purposes:
    >
    > 1. Copying family VHS tapes (4 to 20 years old) to DVD.
    > 2. Copying family Digital8 tapes (new to 4 years old) to DVD.
    > 3. Recording TV programs from analog cable.
    >
    > Given the above, I am restricting my options to boxes with
    > both firewire (for dubbing the Digital 8) and time base
    > correction (for best recovering the signals from the old VHS).
    > I was hoping to stay in the ball park of $400. It
    > seems I can satisfy all my criteria but one, with which one
    > depending on my choice of model. Here are units I am
    > considering:
    >
    > 1. The JVC MV1S combination DVD burner and VHS deck. Firewire,
    > TBC, good MPEG encoding, no hard drive, under $400.
    > 2. The Panasonic E100 or E95. No VCR, but has firewire, TBC,
    > and a 120 Gb hard drive. $650.
    > 3. The JVC MV30U, DVD burner, VCR, 160Gb HD, $768.
    >
    > I have ruled out Toshiba because of the reported black level
    > problems. (I am in the US. These don't exist everywhere.)
    >
    > I ruled out Pioneer because of reports that they do a poor
    > job recording poor quality VHS output.
    >
    > Rick


    Any device that converts analog video to digital video does a TBC function,
    the differences in performance is how good a job they do at deriving sync
    information from the analog video signal. Analog video tape recordings
    suffer from drop-outs and sync compression and when they have been copied
    several times these problems are magnified greatly.

    Unfortunately few product reviews even know about these problems, so your
    best bet is to get a poor quality VHS tape and see if you can try it with
    different brands of DVD recorders to find out which ones have the better TBC
    functions.

    I use a Sony DV encoder and sometimes use an external TBC to fix really bad
    tapes that the Sony will not handle well. I then use my computer to clean
    up the video signal before I encode it into mpeg2 for DVD authoring. I have
    run tests using the same high quality video capture to make a DVD disk in my
    computer with software and also make a DVD using a friends Philips DVD
    recorder, I was trying to confirm whether a real time one pass hardware mpeg
    encoder was as good as a multiple pass software encoder. The answer was the
    hardware encoder in the Philips DVD recorder was OK, but not nearly as good
    as the software method, but it took me about 1 year to learn how to do the
    best DVD encoding from analog video sources, and the stand alone DVD
    recorders are definitely easier and faster to use.

    Mike T
    Mike T, Oct 16, 2004
    #10
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