Dial-up, 2 computer, printer and wifi help

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by bighead, Oct 21, 2007.

  1. bighead

    bighead Guest

    My in-laws refuse to get DSL since they want to keep AOL dial up.
    However they want to network their 2 computers, share internet, share
    files and share the printer. I've done this a lot with broadband
    connections...but the dial-up seems to be a curve ball I don't
    understand.

    Here's what we have
    1 Desktop computer, XP Home, Wired Ethernet, 56K modem
    1 Laptop computer, XP Home, 802.11g wifi card
    1 D-link router/switch/11g access point
    1 printer


    The setup wizard on the D-link router gives us fits since it insinsts
    that something is broken since it can't "find the internet." The
    router seems to need a connection on the WAN port.

    Here's how I think I should set it up...

    Desktop wired (Cat5) to D-link.
    Desktop wired (USB) to the printer
    Desktop wired (RJ11) to the telephone line
    Laptop wifi to D-link

    How do I tell the Desktop to act as a NAT router and provide DHCP
    service to the laptop?
    Will I somehow have 2 IP addresses on the deskop (1 facing the
    internet and 1 private IP facing the inside network)?


    There must be a tutorial on this somewhere...I just couldn't it.


    Thank you.
     
    bighead, Oct 21, 2007
    #1
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  2. bighead

    Mr. Arnold Guest

    "bighead" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My in-laws refuse to get DSL since they want to keep AOL dial up.
    > However they want to network their 2 computers, share internet, share
    > files and share the printer. I've done this a lot with broadband
    > connections...but the dial-up seems to be a curve ball I don't
    > understand.
    >
    > Here's what we have
    > 1 Desktop computer, XP Home, Wired Ethernet, 56K modem
    > 1 Laptop computer, XP Home, 802.11g wifi card
    > 1 D-link router/switch/11g access point
    > 1 printer
    >
    >
    > The setup wizard on the D-link router gives us fits since it insinsts
    > that something is broken since it can't "find the internet." The
    > router seems to need a connection on the WAN port.
    >
    > Here's how I think I should set it up...
    >
    > Desktop wired (Cat5) to D-link.
    > Desktop wired (USB) to the printer
    > Desktop wired (RJ11) to the telephone line
    > Laptop wifi to D-link
    >
    > How do I tell the Desktop to act as a NAT router and provide DHCP
    > service to the laptop?
    > Will I somehow have 2 IP addresses on the deskop (1 facing the
    > internet and 1 private IP facing the inside network)?
    >
    >
    > There must be a tutorial on this somewhere...I just couldn't it.
    >
    >


    Doesn't AOL have a BB connection too? EarthLink and I know with Netzero one
    can connect via dial-up or BB for the same price, using the same services
    and features between the two types of connections. Once a user-id and
    password is given by the ISP, it doesn't matter how one connects.

    I suspect it's that way with AOL too, with EL and Netzero being national and
    global in a sense. AOL should be too. I can get to EL anyway I choose to
    connect, as long as I pay the bill, which I do it both ways dial-up and
    wireless via BB when I am in a hotel with wireless or in a cafe. When I can
    only use a dial-up then, I am using that.

    Testing a family member's machine from my BB connected network at the time,
    I was able to to connect to Netzero with her account using the machine,
    while she is able to connect on a dial-up with the same account same price.

    I am not paying any more money. The price for my account is the same with EL
    no matter how I connect.

    So, dump the dial-up, use the NAT router properly with all machines going
    through the router wired or wireless with the router acting as the gateway
    and the DHCP server for the LAN and be done with it. There is no need for
    complications if it's not warranted.

    You can can also get an Ethernet print server, plug the printer into it,
    and plug the print server into a LAN port on the router. All machines using
    the router wired or wireless will be able to use the printer without the
    need of a computer hosting the printer.
     
    Mr. Arnold, Oct 21, 2007
    #2
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  3. bighead

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2007-10-21, bighead <> wrote:
    > My in-laws refuse to get DSL since they want to keep AOL dial up.


    Is that because DSL is not available where they are, or because it costs
    significantly more than they think they are paying for dialup, or because
    they don't want to 'learn something new'? If the latter, then try
    explaining that using a DSL connection with an off-the-shelf home-user
    router/modem involves a lot less 'learning something new' than trying to
    set up a LAN with a dialup internet connection.

    > However they want to network their 2 computers, share internet, share
    > files and share the printer. I've done this a lot with broadband
    > connections...but the dial-up seems to be a curve ball I don't
    > understand.
    >
    > Here's what we have
    > 1 Desktop computer, XP Home, Wired Ethernet, 56K modem
    > 1 Laptop computer, XP Home, 802.11g wifi card
    > 1 D-link router/switch/11g access point
    > 1 printer
    >
    >
    > The setup wizard on the D-link router gives us fits since it insinsts
    > that something is broken since it can't "find the internet." The
    > router seems to need a connection on the WAN port.


    Home-user DSL routers are mostly built to assume that there is an 'always
    on' internet connection.

    > Here's how I think I should set it up...
    >
    > Desktop wired (Cat5) to D-link.
    > Desktop wired (USB) to the printer
    > Desktop wired (RJ11) to the telephone line
    > Laptop wifi to D-link
    >
    > How do I tell the Desktop to act as a NAT router and provide DHCP
    > service to the laptop?
    > Will I somehow have 2 IP addresses on the deskop (1 facing the
    > internet and 1 private IP facing the inside network)?


    Yes (although Microsoft Windows has some peculiar ways of operating that
    make this less than transparent sometimes). You will have a WAN (Wide
    Area Network, ie Internet, public) IP number allocated by the ISP to your
    internet connection each time you connect - that might well change each
    time, on a dialup connection. Your own LAN (Local Area Network) will have
    a purely local block of IP numbers so that the local computers can
    identify each other.

    >
    > There must be a tutorial on this somewhere...I just couldn't it.
    >
    >
    > Thank you.


    Does <http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp_ics/> look helpful?
    Or go straight to the horse's mouth
    <http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/expert/crawford_02july01.mspx>

    I'm sure that Windows XP has a way of sharing the internet connection of
    'this' computer with others. If 'this' computer can always be running
    whenever the 'other' wants to connect to the internet then things should
    work without needing a seperate router at all, as long as 'this' computer
    has a WiFi card (or wired ethernet card) to make the connection with the
    'other' computer.

    I think a more convenient arrangement would be to get a 'dialup router',
    ie one that can connect to the internet using either a seperate dialup
    modem or its own built-in one. The Multi-Tech RF102S doesn't have its own
    WiFi but the WiFlyer does. I don't know if either of those will work with
    AOL in the USA. There are other models - but they are scarce, thanks to
    the growth of DSL and Cable broadband. A web search for

    dialup router

    should get you useful suggestions for your part of the world.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Oct 21, 2007
    #3
  4. bighead

    bighead Guest

    > Is that because DSL is not available where they are, or because it costs
    > significantly more than they think they are paying for dialup, or because
    > they don't want to 'learn something new'?


    They are just wacky. They feel tethered to their AOL and don't
    understand that AOL is available for free if you have broadband. To
    them AOL "IS" the internet. They also travel about 30% of the year
    and they can grasp that any phone line equals they can get to AOL.

    They do have DSL, Cable and Fiber available at the house. I think
    they could have home DSL and a Verizon EVDO laptop card for just a
    little more than they currently pay for AOL. Yeah, it's nuts...but we
    love 'em.


    > Does <http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp_ics/> look helpful?
    > Or go straight to the horse's mouth
    > <http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/expert/crawford_0...>


    These are good thanks...

    > I'm sure that Windows XP has a way of sharing the internet connection of
    > 'this' computer with others. If 'this' computer can always be running
    > whenever the 'other' wants to connect to the internet then things should
    > work without needing a seperate router at all, as long as 'this' computer
    > has a WiFi card (or wired ethernet card) to make the connection with the
    > 'other' computer.


    The more I think about it I don't the the internet sharing feature
    through XP is realistic for them. The technology exists, but the in-
    laws still power off their computer every time they are done with it.
    That doesn't really support an "always on" dial up.


    > I think a more convenient arrangement would be to get a 'dialup router',
    > ie one that can connect to the internet using either a seperate dialup
    > modem or its own built-in one. The Multi-Tech RF102S doesn't have its own
    > WiFi but the WiFlyer does. I don't know if either of those will work with
    > AOL in the USA. There are other models - but they are scarce, thanks to
    > the growth of DSL and Cable broadband.


    WiFlyer looks like what they need. It just don't think they'll spend
    the money.
     
    bighead, Oct 21, 2007
    #4
  5. bighead

    w_tom Guest

    On Oct 21, 8:51 am, bighead <> wrote:
    > The more I think about it I don't the the internet sharing feature
    > through XP is realistic for them. The technology exists, but the in-
    > laws still power off their computer every time they are done with it.
    > That doesn't really support an "always on" dial up.


    Internet sharing can work if the one computer has the ethernet card
    enabled to wake up. Setup the router; enable a local network. Setup
    the internet sharing feature on one computer. Now they have
    everything necessary to upgrade to DSL. A local network is required
    anyway even if using DSL. Eventually the difficulty with using
    Internet Sharing (waiting for that computer to wake up and waiting for
    it to automatically dial AOL) will become tedious.

    Some ISPs (ie United Online) will block Internet Sharing. Don't
    know if that is true with AOL.
     
    w_tom, Oct 21, 2007
    #5
  6. bighead

    bighead Guest

    On Oct 21, 1:51 am, "Mr. Arnold" <MR. > wrote:
    > Doesn't AOL have a BB connection too? EarthLink and I know with Netzero one
    > can connect via dial-up or BB for the same price, using the same services
    > and features between the two types of connections. Once a user-id and
    > password is given by the ISP, it doesn't matter how one connects.
    >
    > I suspect it's that way with AOL too, with EL and Netzero being national and
    > global in a sense. AOL should be too. I can get to EL anyway I choose to
    > connect, as long as I pay the bill, which I do it both ways dial-up and
    > wireless via BB when I am in a hotel with wireless or in a cafe. When I can
    > only use a dial-up then, I am using that.
    >
    > Testing a family member's machine from my BB connected network at the time,
    > I was able to to connect to Netzero with her account using the machine,
    > while she is able to connect on a dial-up with the same account same price.
    >
    > I am not paying any more money. The price for my account is the same with EL
    > no matter how I connect.


    I hear you...the in-laws are just not rational about technology. They
    fretted for 6 months about buying a $200 emachines PC...like I
    said...we love 'em.
     
    bighead, Oct 21, 2007
    #6
  7. bighead

    Bill Guest

    "bighead" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My in-laws refuse to get DSL since they want to keep AOL dial up.
    > However they want to network their 2 computers, share internet, share
    > files and share the printer.



    Years ago, before DSL was availiable to me, I did this with a proxy server
    running on the main machine/gateway. The IP of the gateway must always be
    the same/fixed.

    Sorry, but I can't recall the one I used.

    Bill
     
    Bill, Oct 22, 2007
    #7
  8. bighead wrote:
    > My in-laws refuse to get DSL since they want to keep AOL dial up.
    > However they want to network their 2 computers, share internet, share
    > files and share the printer. I've done this a lot with broadband
    > connections...but the dial-up seems to be a curve ball I don't
    > understand.
    >
    > Here's what we have
    > 1 Desktop computer, XP Home, Wired Ethernet, 56K modem
    > 1 Laptop computer, XP Home, 802.11g wifi card
    > 1 D-link router/switch/11g access point
    > 1 printer
    >
    >
    > The setup wizard on the D-link router gives us fits since it insinsts
    > that something is broken since it can't "find the internet." The
    > router seems to need a connection on the WAN port.
    >
    > Here's how I think I should set it up...
    >
    > Desktop wired (Cat5) to D-link.
    > Desktop wired (USB) to the printer
    > Desktop wired (RJ11) to the telephone line
    > Laptop wifi to D-link
    >
    > How do I tell the Desktop to act as a NAT router and provide DHCP
    > service to the laptop?
    > Will I somehow have 2 IP addresses on the deskop (1 facing the
    > internet and 1 private IP facing the inside network)?
    >
    >
    > There must be a tutorial on this somewhere...I just couldn't it.
    >
    >
    > Thank you.
    >

    GOOGLE IS YOUR FRIEND DUMBASS.
     
    Paige D'Winter, Oct 23, 2007
    #8
  9. bighead

    Phat Sam Guest

    On Tue, 23 Oct 2007 14:28:19 -0700, Paige D'Winter
    <> wrote:

    >> There must be a tutorial on this somewhere...I just couldn't it.

    There's 2 basic ways to do it. 1> Find a router that supports it, 2>
    Use the internet sharing wizard thingy and probably wire the desktop
    computer to the WAN connector on the router.... Though the far easiest
    way is just find a router that supports it. My Dlink DI-707
    (ancient, old modal) supported it and my Apple Air Port (first modal)
    supported it even using AOL dial-up! But the apple Airport must be
    configured with an Apple Computer of some sort first.... Once its
    configured, it'll provide WIFI and 1 eithernet port to any
    computer....
     
    Phat Sam, Oct 24, 2007
    #9
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