Diagnose this??!

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by fran_beta@hotmail.com, Mar 15, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Last year I bought a 128MB "thumb drive" (AStone). I've used it for
    nearly a year without problems.

    Based on this I ordered a bunch for my students this year so that they
    could move files between work and school, and have a work around
    solution for when their profiles weren't being recognised by the server
    and they wanted to save something. (Don't laugh)

    Anyhow, two of the students approached me and saifd that although the
    machines in the library were recognising the devices, the drives
    appeared to be empty, despite the fact that they'd saved stuff onto
    them elsewhere in the school.

    All machines are ghosted from the same image.

    I inserted my identical piece of hardware into a library machine (using
    a student profile), and it both recognised my device AND the files on
    it.

    I reason that if the machine itself was faulty, or the software not up
    to the job (eg it had become corrupted since ghosting), it should not
    have read files on my drive. If the students' hardware was faulty, the
    drives should not have bean writeable anyplace else.

    Have I overlooked something obvious?

    Any ideas treated gratefully.

    Fran
    , Mar 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. «BONEHEAD>> Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Last year I bought a 128MB "thumb drive" (AStone). I've used it for
    > nearly a year without problems.
    >
    > Based on this I ordered a bunch for my students this year so that they
    > could move files between work and school, and have a work around
    > solution for when their profiles weren't being recognised by the server
    > and they wanted to save something. (Don't laugh)
    >
    > Anyhow, two of the students approached me and saifd that although the
    > machines in the library were recognising the devices, the drives
    > appeared to be empty, despite the fact that they'd saved stuff onto
    > them elsewhere in the school.
    >
    > All machines are ghosted from the same image.
    >
    > I inserted my identical piece of hardware into a library machine (using
    > a student profile), and it both recognised my device AND the files on
    > it.
    >
    > I reason that if the machine itself was faulty, or the software not up
    > to the job (eg it had become corrupted since ghosting), it should not
    > have read files on my drive. If the students' hardware was faulty, the
    > drives should not have bean writeable anyplace else.
    >
    > Have I overlooked something obvious?
    >
    > Any ideas treated gratefully.
    >

    And your using What OS???
    Your students machines at home are using what OS???
    What Kind of thumb drive.???

    As a diagnosis I'd say at this point you have Liver cancer...
    That is based on info provided...

    --
    <B0N3H3@D>
    "I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious." Albert Einstein
    «BONEHEAD>>, Mar 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. Spammy Sammy Guest

    "«BONEHEAD>>" <> wrote in message
    news:%VAZd.20627$...
    > ...As a diagnosis I'd say at this point you have Liver cancer...
    > That is based on info provided...


    bit strong mate!
    Spammy Sammy, Mar 15, 2005
    #3
  4. Spammy Sammy Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > snip


    Thumb drives have caused me problems in the past. In one instance the drive
    was reported empty on insertion into a new machine even though files were
    present on the thumb. Sounds similar to your problem, but in my case the
    contents of the thumb were erased on first insertion.

    A get around was to backup the thumb contents onto a good pc, insert the
    thumb and let the PC reformat or erase or whatever it did (we still don't
    know why by the way), then write the files back onto the thumb. Each time we
    have done this the thumb has had no problems since. Something to do with the
    PC itself writing the files rather than reading those already on.

    Also don't forget that your thumb is older so therefore may have a different
    chip inside it than those your students have.

    Dunno if this is any use to you though.
    Spammy Sammy, Mar 15, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    Spammy Sammy wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > snip

    >
    > Thumb drives have caused me problems in the past. In one instance the

    drive
    > was reported empty on insertion into a new machine even though files

    were
    > present on the thumb. Sounds similar to your problem, but in my case

    the
    > contents of the thumb were erased on first insertion.
    >
    > A get around was to backup the thumb contents onto a good pc, insert

    the
    > thumb and let the PC reformat or erase or whatever it did (we still

    don't
    > know why by the way), then write the files back onto the thumb. Each

    time we
    > have done this the thumb has had no problems since. Something to do

    with the
    > PC itself writing the files rather than reading those already on.
    >
    > Also don't forget that your thumb is older so therefore may have a

    different
    > chip inside it than those your students have.
    >
    > Dunno if this is any use to you though.


    Thanks very much for your thoughts. I'll give this a try.

    Another odd thing is that a handful of the PC's in the school either
    refuse to recognise the thumbs at all, (including mine) or start up the
    "Found New Hardware" wizard and start asking for drivers.

    Yet the entire scool is on Windows 2000 (NT)

    Fran
    , Mar 15, 2005
    #5
  6. Guest

    «BONEHEAD>> wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Last year I bought a 128MB "thumb drive" (AStone). I've used it for
    > > nearly a year without problems.
    > >
    > > Based on this I ordered a bunch for my students this year so that

    they
    > > could move files between work and school, and have a work around
    > > solution for when their profiles weren't being recognised by the

    server
    > > and they wanted to save something. (Don't laugh)
    > >
    > > Anyhow, two of the students approached me and saifd that although

    the
    > > machines in the library were recognising the devices, the drives
    > > appeared to be empty, despite the fact that they'd saved stuff onto
    > > them elsewhere in the school.
    > >
    > > All machines are ghosted from the same image.
    > >
    > > I inserted my identical piece of hardware into a library machine

    (using
    > > a student profile), and it both recognised my device AND the files

    on
    > > it.
    > >
    > > I reason that if the machine itself was faulty, or the software not

    up
    > > to the job (eg it had become corrupted since ghosting), it should

    not
    > > have read files on my drive. If the students' hardware was faulty,

    the
    > > drives should not have bean writeable anyplace else.
    > >
    > > Have I overlooked something obvious?
    > >
    > > Any ideas treated gratefully.
    > >

    > And your using What OS???



    The entire school is on Windows 2000 (NT)


    > Your students machines at home are using what OS???



    I'll ask.

    > What Kind of thumb drive.???
    >


    AStone 128 MB

    > As a diagnosis I'd say at this point you have Liver cancer...
    > That is based on info provided...
    >



    Let me know if this info helps.

    FRan
    , Mar 15, 2005
    #6
  7. On 15 Mar 2005 11:09:23 -0800, wrote:

    >
    >«BONEHEAD>> wrote:
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Last year I bought a 128MB "thumb drive" (AStone). I've used it for
    >> > nearly a year without problems.
    >> >
    >> > Based on this I ordered a bunch for my students this year so that

    >they
    >> > could move files between work and school, and have a work around
    >> > solution for when their profiles weren't being recognised by the

    >server
    >> > and they wanted to save something. (Don't laugh)
    >> >
    >> > Anyhow, two of the students approached me and saifd that although

    >the
    >> > machines in the library were recognising the devices, the drives
    >> > appeared to be empty, despite the fact that they'd saved stuff onto
    >> > them elsewhere in the school.
    >> >
    >> > All machines are ghosted from the same image.
    >> >
    >> > I inserted my identical piece of hardware into a library machine

    >(using
    >> > a student profile), and it both recognised my device AND the files

    >on
    >> > it.
    >> >
    >> > I reason that if the machine itself was faulty, or the software not

    >up
    >> > to the job (eg it had become corrupted since ghosting), it should

    >not
    >> > have read files on my drive. If the students' hardware was faulty,

    >the
    >> > drives should not have bean writeable anyplace else.
    >> >
    >> > Have I overlooked something obvious?
    >> >
    >> > Any ideas treated gratefully.
    >> >

    >> And your using What OS???

    >
    >
    >The entire school is on Windows 2000 (NT)
    >
    >
    >> Your students machines at home are using what OS???

    >
    >
    >I'll ask.
    >
    >> What Kind of thumb drive.???
    >>

    >
    >AStone 128 MB


    As was in the original post... :)

    >
    >> As a diagnosis I'd say at this point you have Liver cancer...
    >> That is based on info provided...
    >>

    >
    >
    >Let me know if this info helps.


    Nice restraint.

    Tom

    >
    >FRan
    Tom MacIntyre, Mar 15, 2005
    #7
  8. Guest

    Rightard Whitey wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > Last year I bought a 128MB "thumb drive" (AStone). I've used it for
    > > nearly a year without problems.
    > >
    > > Based on this I ordered a bunch for my students this year so that

    they
    > > could move files between work and school, and have a work around
    > > solution for when their profiles weren't being recognised by the

    server
    > > and they wanted to save something. (Don't laugh)
    > >
    > > Anyhow, two of the students approached me and saifd that although

    the
    > > machines in the library were recognising the devices, the drives
    > > appeared to be empty, despite the fact that they'd saved stuff onto
    > > them elsewhere in the school.
    > >
    > > All machines are ghosted from the same image.
    > >
    > > I inserted my identical piece of hardware into a library machine

    (using
    > > a student profile), and it both recognised my device AND the files

    on
    > > it.
    > >
    > > I reason that if the machine itself was faulty, or the software not

    up
    > > to the job (eg it had become corrupted since ghosting), it should

    not
    > > have read files on my drive. If the students' hardware was faulty,

    the
    > > drives should not have bean writeable anyplace else.
    > >
    > > Have I overlooked something obvious?
    > >
    > > Any ideas treated gratefully.
    > >
    > > Fran
    > >
    > >

    > Did you check the USB flash drives on other PCs?


    Good point. I only have their word for it that the devices worked on
    other school machines. I'll check that first opportunity.

    > Did you try other USB
    > ports on the library machines?


    No ... both my drive and those of the kids were inserted into the front
    port only.

    Thanks

    Fran
    , Mar 15, 2005
    #8
  9. Guest

    Tom MacIntyre wrote:
    > On 15 Mar 2005 11:09:23 -0800, wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >«BONEHEAD>> wrote:
    > >> <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> > Last year I bought a 128MB "thumb drive" (AStone). I've used it

    for
    > >> > nearly a year without problems.
    > >> >
    > >> > Based on this I ordered a bunch for my students this year so

    that
    > >they
    > >> > could move files between work and school, and have a work around
    > >> > solution for when their profiles weren't being recognised by the

    > >server
    > >> > and they wanted to save something. (Don't laugh)
    > >> >
    > >> > Anyhow, two of the students approached me and saifd that

    although
    > >the
    > >> > machines in the library were recognising the devices, the drives
    > >> > appeared to be empty, despite the fact that they'd saved stuff

    onto
    > >> > them elsewhere in the school.
    > >> >
    > >> > All machines are ghosted from the same image.
    > >> >
    > >> > I inserted my identical piece of hardware into a library machine

    > >(using
    > >> > a student profile), and it both recognised my device AND the

    files
    > >on
    > >> > it.
    > >> >
    > >> > I reason that if the machine itself was faulty, or the software

    not
    > >up
    > >> > to the job (eg it had become corrupted since ghosting), it

    should
    > >not
    > >> > have read files on my drive. If the students' hardware was

    faulty,
    > >the
    > >> > drives should not have bean writeable anyplace else.
    > >> >
    > >> > Have I overlooked something obvious?
    > >> >
    > >> > Any ideas treated gratefully.
    > >> >
    > >> And your using What OS???

    > >
    > >
    > >The entire school is on Windows 2000 (NT)
    > >
    > >
    > >> Your students machines at home are using what OS???

    > >
    > >
    > >I'll ask.
    > >
    > >> What Kind of thumb drive.???
    > >>

    > >
    > >AStone 128 MB

    >
    > As was in the original post... :)
    >
    > >
    > >> As a diagnosis I'd say at this point you have Liver cancer...
    > >> That is based on info provided...
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >Let me know if this info helps.

    >
    > Nice restraint.
    >
    > Tom
    >


    Good manners cost nothing, and are highly advisable when you come as a
    supplicant.

    For the record one of the kids now says it's working in the library,
    after he took the Windows '98 driver cd and installed it on his home
    PC.

    "Oh, so you're running Win'98" I asked.

    "No, XP ..."

    Hmmm...

    Curiouser and curiouser

    Fran
    , Mar 16, 2005
    #9
  10. «BONEHEAD>> Guest

    Good manners cost nothing, and are highly advisable when you come as a
    supplicant.

    For the record one of the kids now says it's working in the library,
    after he took the Windows '98 driver cd and installed it on his home
    PC.

    "Oh, so you're running Win'98" I asked.

    "No, XP ..."

    Hmmm...

    Curiouser and curiouser

    I was just trying to make light of the fact that you didn't provide much
    info...
    Some people don't have a sense of humor and are easily offended...
    I am glad you are not one of them and used it as an incentive to
    be a little more thorough in your description of the situation....

    For the record, I can be a smart ass, but when I have good info,
    I provide good answers... But then again sometimes I don't have
    enough time to post a complete answer, and being a smart ass is quicker :)


    --
    <B0N3H3@D>
    "I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious." Albert Einstein
    «BONEHEAD>>, Mar 16, 2005
    #10
  11. Guest

    «BONEHEAD>> wrote:
    > Good manners cost nothing, and are highly advisable when you come as

    a
    > supplicant.
    >
    > For the record one of the kids now says it's working in the library,
    > after he took the Windows '98 driver cd and installed it on his home
    > PC.
    >
    > "Oh, so you're running Win'98" I asked.
    >
    > "No, XP ..."
    >
    > Hmmm...
    >
    > Curiouser and curiouser
    >
    > I was just trying to make light of the fact that you didn't provide

    much
    > info...
    > Some people don't have a sense of humor and are easily offended...
    > I am glad you are not one of them and used it as an incentive to
    > be a little more thorough in your description of the situation....
    >
    > For the record, I can be a smart ass, but when I have good info,
    > I provide good answers... But then again sometimes I don't have
    > enough time to post a complete answer, and being a smart ass is

    quicker :)
    >
    >



    Fair enough ... No offence was taken by me.

    Cheers


    Fran
    , Mar 16, 2005
    #11
  12. Guest

    There is a issues called "write delay" or somthing like that.

    Basically if you save somthing to a usb drive and yank it out of the
    port immeadiatly, whatever you saved won't be there. I always make
    sure I wait 1 minute after saving before I pull the drive out.

    I have also seen issues where my drive won't appear to be immeadiatly
    reckonized, You have to go into the disk management console and change
    the drive letter, or some times even "import forign disk"

    Good luck
    , Mar 19, 2005
    #12
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