DHCP AND STATIC IP's through a router

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Colin Mckechnie, Jun 20, 2005.

  1. Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home

    I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for DHCP i
    want to put something else on the network but it will only work using a
    static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP and the other 3 DHCP?
    the router is a linksys 4 port cable router BFRS41 or something along those
    lines?
    Colin Mckechnie, Jun 20, 2005
    #1
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  2. Colin Mckechnie

    Vanguard Guest

    "Colin Mckechnie" <> wrote in message
    news:AWDte.27663$...
    > Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >
    > I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for
    > DHCP i want to put something else on the network but it will only work
    > using a static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP and the
    > other 3 DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router BFRS41 or
    > something along those lines?
    >



    Unlike the D-Link that I had, the Linksys BEFSR41 does not allow
    assigning static IP addresses to specific hosts based on their MAC
    address. This was handy in that all hosts could simply be left in the
    default TCP configuration of using DHCP and the D-Link router would
    always assign the same IP address to a host based on its MAC address.
    This allowed one central spot to manage your intranetwork's IP
    addresses. With the Linksys BEFSR41, you have to go to the host where
    you want a static IP address and define it that way in its TCP
    properties. Instead of using DHCP, you specify what IP address that
    host will always use. That means you now have to manage the static IP
    addresses of all your hosts (by going to each one to [re]configure it).

    Use a different range of IP addresses to avoid hitting one that your
    router happens to assign using its DHCP server. The router has a range
    you can specify within which it is allowed to assign dynamic IP
    addresses. I believe the default for the Linksys is 192.168.1.100 to
    192.168.1.149 (for a total of 50 IP addresses). So use a different
    range for your IP addresses, like 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.254. The
    the router's DHCP server will never happen to assign a dynamic address
    within the range you have set aside for static IP addresses. But you'll
    have to wander over to each host to manually configure it to specify a
    static IP address instead of using DHCP.
    Vanguard, Jun 20, 2005
    #2
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  3. Colin Mckechnie

    why? Guest

    On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 18:29:52 GMT, Colin Mckechnie wrote:

    >Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >
    >I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for DHCP i
    >want to put something else on the network but it will only work using a
    >static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP and the other 3 DHCP?


    Not perhaps in the way you think. Normally that type of router (read the
    manual) has a pool of DHCP addresses, say 192.168.1 to 192.168.200 (you
    should be able to alter the start / end / size of the pool.

    All you need to simply do is set the 1 PC to a manually assigned
    address, for the example above say 192.168.0.210 , if the pool is ver
    large simply shrink it and use a address past the end of the new pool
    range.

    >the router is a linksys 4 port cable router BFRS41 or something along those
    >lines?
    >


    If you then want to make the Pc with the static IP have a visible
    external service, say mail or www there is another step you need. Again
    read the manual and look for port forwarding also see
    http://www.portforward.com/

    The way this works is taking the public IP ( address from your post
    headers ) 62.253.181.155 and if you are running a webserver on port 80 ,
    you configure port forwarding to take those external public values and
    forward them to the internal 192.168.0.210 port 80, PC.


    Next search 24HSHD
    http://groups-beta.google.com/group/24hoursupport.helpdesk?
    and look for the many bits of advice and URLs to home networking sites
    that are often posted.

    Other routers have a DMZ port for doing things like this, but you have
    to be very careful your system is secure. Again search 24HSHD and try
    www.google.com



    Me
    why?, Jun 20, 2005
    #3
  4. Colin Mckechnie

    pcbutts1 Guest

    Yes you can.

    --


    The best live web video on the internet http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com



    "Colin Mckechnie" <> wrote in message
    news:AWDte.27663$...
    > Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >
    > I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for DHCP i
    > want to put something else on the network but it will only work using a
    > static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP and the other 3
    > DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router BFRS41 or something
    > along those lines?
    >
    pcbutts1, Jun 20, 2005
    #4
  5. Colin Mckechnie

    PJB Guest

    "Colin Mckechnie" <> wrote in message
    news:AWDte.27663$...
    > Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >
    > I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for DHCP i
    > want to put something else on the network but it will only work using a
    > static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP and the other 3

    DHCP?
    > the router is a linksys 4 port cable router BFRS41 or something along

    those
    > lines?
    >
    >


    You can't normally specify which ports the DHCP server in your router uses,
    but you don't need to. Give the "something else" a static address, but use
    one outside of the range normally allocated by DHCP.

    P.
    PJB, Jun 20, 2005
    #5
  6. Colin Mckechnie

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Colin Mckechnie wrote:

    > Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >
    > I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for DHCP i
    > want to put something else on the network but it will only work using a
    > static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP and the other 3
    > DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router BFRS41 or something
    > along those lines?


    A static IP is any IP on the router that is not under the control of the
    DHCP Server on the Linksys router.

    Linksys DHCP IP(s) usually start at 192.168.1.100 for whatever the DHCP
    count is like 50. So the DHCP IP(s) are 192,168.1.100 to 192.168.1.151.

    Any IP(s) not in that range are static IP(s).

    So you would configure the NIC on the machine to NOT *Obtain an IP
    Automatically*.

    And you would enter the IP information manually:

    1) IP = 192.168.1.2 or something like 192.168.2.1
    2) Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0 --- the Linksys' Subnet Mask IP
    3) Gateway = 192.168.1.1 -- the Linksys' Device IP

    Use the following DNS server address:

    4) Those IP(s) will point the the ISP(s) DNS servers and there is an Admin
    screen on the Linksys router that shows the public IP and the DNS IP(s) the
    router is using and you'll use the two DNS IP(s) from that screen when
    entering that information for the DNS IP(s) the NIC will use.

    That's how you tell the NIC on the computer to use a static IP(s) on the
    router.

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Jun 20, 2005
    #6
  7. Colin Mckechnie

    doS Guest

    where did you learn to count?

    100-151 is how many?

    "Duane Arnold" <> wrote in message
    news:5YFte.72688$_o.64017@attbi_s71...
    > Colin Mckechnie wrote:
    >
    > > Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    > >
    > > I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for DHCP

    i
    > > want to put something else on the network but it will only work using a
    > > static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP and the other 3
    > > DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router BFRS41 or something
    > > along those lines?

    >
    > A static IP is any IP on the router that is not under the control of the
    > DHCP Server on the Linksys router.
    >
    > Linksys DHCP IP(s) usually start at 192.168.1.100 for whatever the DHCP
    > count is like 50. So the DHCP IP(s) are 192,168.1.100 to 192.168.1.151.
    >
    > Any IP(s) not in that range are static IP(s).
    >
    > So you would configure the NIC on the machine to NOT *Obtain an IP
    > Automatically*.
    >
    > And you would enter the IP information manually:
    >
    > 1) IP = 192.168.1.2 or something like 192.168.2.1
    > 2) Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0 --- the Linksys' Subnet Mask IP
    > 3) Gateway = 192.168.1.1 -- the Linksys' Device IP
    >
    > Use the following DNS server address:
    >
    > 4) Those IP(s) will point the the ISP(s) DNS servers and there is an Admin
    > screen on the Linksys router that shows the public IP and the DNS IP(s)

    the
    > router is using and you'll use the two DNS IP(s) from that screen when
    > entering that information for the DNS IP(s) the NIC will use.
    >
    > That's how you tell the NIC on the computer to use a static IP(s) on the
    > router.
    >
    > Duane :)
    >
    >
    >
    doS, Jun 20, 2005
    #7
  8. Colin Mckechnie

    Duane Arnold Guest

    doS wrote:

    > where did you learn to count?
    >
    > 100-151 is how many?


    Is this all you have to do in life is act an ass? ;-)

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Jun 21, 2005
    #8
  9. Colin Mckechnie

    Guest Guest


    >
    >
    >
    >

    "Duane Arnold" <> wrote in message
    news:8%Hte.73224$_o.17726@attbi_s71...
    > doS wrote:
    >
    > > where did you learn to count?
    > >
    > > 100-151 is how many?

    >
    > Is this all you have to do in life is act an ass? ;-)
    >
    > Duane :)
    Guest, Jun 21, 2005
    #9
  10. Colin Mckechnie

    Duane Arnold Guest

    doS wrote:

    > where did you learn to count?
    >
    > 100-151 is how many?
    >

    The next time why don't you apply some of your technical expertise, if
    that's possible <g>, instead of trying to bring up trouble that's going to
    start *clowns* posting to me. I expect the Queen to show soon. ;-)

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Jun 21, 2005
    #10
  11. Colin Mckechnie

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Vanguard wrote:
    > "Colin Mckechnie" <> wrote in message
    > news:AWDte.27663$...
    >
    >> Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >>
    >> I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for
    >> DHCP i want to put something else on the network but it will only work
    >> using a static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP and the
    >> other 3 DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router BFRS41 or
    >> something along those lines?
    >>

    >
    >
    > Unlike the D-Link that I had, the Linksys BEFSR41 does not allow
    > assigning static IP addresses to specific hosts based on their MAC
    > address.


    That is not the whole truth: Linsys BEFSR41 permits you to limit the
    DHCP assigment of IP addresses to a RANGE! All IP outside that range
    can be given as FIXED ip addresses.
    Rick Merrill, Jun 21, 2005
    #11
  12. Colin Mckechnie

    Vanguard Guest

    "Rick Merrill" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Vanguard wrote:
    >> "Colin Mckechnie" <> wrote in message
    >> news:AWDte.27663$...
    >>
    >>> Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >>>
    >>> I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for
    >>> DHCP i want to put something else on the network but it will only
    >>> work using a static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP
    >>> and the other 3 DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router
    >>> BFRS41 or something along those lines?

    >>
    >> Unlike the D-Link that I had, the Linksys BEFSR41 does not allow
    >> assigning static IP addresses to specific hosts based on their MAC
    >> address.

    >
    > That is not the whole truth: Linsys BEFSR41 permits you to limit the
    > DHCP assigment of IP addresses to a RANGE! All IP outside that range
    > can be given as FIXED ip addresses.



    .... which must be assigned at the *host*, not at the router! So the
    Linksys does nothing to regulate which IP address gets assigned if the
    host already has one assigned and is NOT using DHCP. The host could use
    a static IP address within the range specified for use by the router's
    DHCP server but there is a chance for conflict. If you configure the
    host's TCP properties to use a static IP address high up in the router's
    DHCP range, the router is unlikely to ever get that high unless you
    actually have that many hosts: the router's DHCP server starts assigning
    the dynamic IP addresses from the bottom of its allocated range. Unless
    you are super tight for intranetwork IP addresses, there is rarely any
    reason to overlap your static and dynamic IP ranges.

    So, to be correct, the host can still assign to itself in its TCP
    properties a static IP address that is within the allocated range for
    the router's DHCP server. However, that is not recommended. If the
    router's DHCP server isn't managing the IP address used by a host, it
    doesn't necessarily have a conflict with a host using an IP address
    within the DHCP's server allocated IP range. You avoid the *possible*
    conflict by using a static IP address that the router's DHCP server is
    unlikely to use (i.e., high static IP addresses while the DHCP server
    assigns low dynamic IP addresses for a few hosts). You make it
    impossible for a conflict by using a static IP address that is outside
    the DHCP server's allocation range. The second method is safer but the
    first method is still possible.

    It still comes back to the Linksys not not having the feature to manage
    IP addresses by MAC address. By having the router's DHCP server manage
    who got a fixed IP address based on their MAC address, I could also
    regulate which intranetwork hosts got to talk to each other. Sure, in
    the Linksys, I could regulate by IP address but since they were dynamic
    then there was no surity which host that I was regulating. Just because
    I'm on a home network doesn't meant that trust all hosts in my home
    since many are not under my control (and I refuse to be everyone's
    freebie onsite PC guru). I lost several nice management features when
    my D-Link died and got a Linksys as its replacement (and at twice the
    price for less features). The firewall rules in the Linksys are less
    capable than in the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no
    rules. For example, I cannot define that a particular host can only
    connect to the Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain
    time periods. I cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN side)
    to be the same as ANY host connected to it but instead can only clone
    the MAC address of the particular host that has its admin web page
    opened (i.e., I have to go to the host and connect from there to the
    Linksys' web server to clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN side).
    Other features in the D-Link were missing from the Linksys, and the
    D-Link cost half as much, but we were in a hurry and had to get an
    immediate replacement that morning which meant heading off to the store
    instead of making an online order.

    I should've pushed for buying a D-Link replacement. Live and burn.
    Vanguard, Jun 21, 2005
    #12
  13. Colin Mckechnie

    pcbutts1 Guest

    "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    The firewall rules in the Linksys are less
    > capable than in the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no
    > rules. For example, I cannot define that a particular host can only
    > connect to the Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain time
    > periods. I cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN side) to be
    > the same as ANY host connected to it but instead can only clone the MAC
    > address of the particular host that has its admin web page opened (i.e., I
    > have to go to the host and connect from there to the Linksys' web server
    > to clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN side).



    Maybe you should upgrade your routers firmware. My linksys does all that.

    --


    The best live web video on the internet http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com



    "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Rick Merrill" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Vanguard wrote:
    >>> "Colin Mckechnie" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:AWDte.27663$...
    >>>
    >>>> Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >>>>
    >>>> I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for DHCP
    >>>> i want to put something else on the network but it will only work using
    >>>> a static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP and the other 3
    >>>> DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router BFRS41 or something
    >>>> along those lines?
    >>>
    >>> Unlike the D-Link that I had, the Linksys BEFSR41 does not allow
    >>> assigning static IP addresses to specific hosts based on their MAC
    >>> address.

    >>
    >> That is not the whole truth: Linsys BEFSR41 permits you to limit the DHCP
    >> assigment of IP addresses to a RANGE! All IP outside that range can be
    >> given as FIXED ip addresses.

    >
    >
    > ... which must be assigned at the *host*, not at the router! So the
    > Linksys does nothing to regulate which IP address gets assigned if the
    > host already has one assigned and is NOT using DHCP. The host could use a
    > static IP address within the range specified for use by the router's DHCP
    > server but there is a chance for conflict. If you configure the host's
    > TCP properties to use a static IP address high up in the router's DHCP
    > range, the router is unlikely to ever get that high unless you actually
    > have that many hosts: the router's DHCP server starts assigning the
    > dynamic IP addresses from the bottom of its allocated range. Unless you
    > are super tight for intranetwork IP addresses, there is rarely any reason
    > to overlap your static and dynamic IP ranges.
    >
    > So, to be correct, the host can still assign to itself in its TCP
    > properties a static IP address that is within the allocated range for the
    > router's DHCP server. However, that is not recommended. If the router's
    > DHCP server isn't managing the IP address used by a host, it doesn't
    > necessarily have a conflict with a host using an IP address within the
    > DHCP's server allocated IP range. You avoid the *possible* conflict by
    > using a static IP address that the router's DHCP server is unlikely to use
    > (i.e., high static IP addresses while the DHCP server assigns low dynamic
    > IP addresses for a few hosts). You make it impossible for a conflict by
    > using a static IP address that is outside the DHCP server's allocation
    > range. The second method is safer but the first method is still possible.
    >
    > It still comes back to the Linksys not not having the feature to manage IP
    > addresses by MAC address. By having the router's DHCP server manage who
    > got a fixed IP address based on their MAC address, I could also regulate
    > which intranetwork hosts got to talk to each other. Sure, in the Linksys,
    > I could regulate by IP address but since they were dynamic then there was
    > no surity which host that I was regulating. Just because I'm on a home
    > network doesn't meant that trust all hosts in my home since many are not
    > under my control (and I refuse to be everyone's freebie onsite PC guru).
    > I lost several nice management features when my D-Link died and got a
    > Linksys as its replacement (and at twice the price for less features).
    > The firewall rules in the Linksys are less capable than in the D-Link,
    > too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no rules. For example, I cannot
    > define that a particular host can only connect to the Internet or to other
    > intranetwork hosts during certain time periods. I cannot clone the
    > Linksys' IP address (on its WAN side) to be the same as ANY host connected
    > to it but instead can only clone the MAC address of the particular host
    > that has its admin web page opened (i.e., I have to go to the host and
    > connect from there to the Linksys' web server to clone its MAC address for
    > the Linksys' WAN side). Other features in the D-Link were missing from the
    > Linksys, and the D-Link cost half as much, but we were in a hurry and had
    > to get an immediate replacement that morning which meant heading off to
    > the store instead of making an online order.
    >
    > I should've pushed for buying a D-Link replacement. Live and burn.
    pcbutts1, Jun 21, 2005
    #13
  14. Colin Mckechnie

    Vanguard Guest

    "pcbutts1" <> wrote in message
    news:rVWte.699$...
    > "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > The firewall rules in the Linksys are less
    >> capable than in the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no
    >> rules. For example, I cannot define that a particular host can only
    >> connect to the Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain
    >> time periods. I cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN
    >> side) to be the same as ANY host connected to it but instead can only
    >> clone the MAC address of the particular host that has its admin web
    >> page opened (i.e., I have to go to the host and connect from there to
    >> the Linksys' web server to clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN
    >> side).

    >
    >
    > Maybe you should upgrade your routers firmware. My linksys does all
    > that.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > The best live web video on the internet
    > http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    > Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com
    >
    >
    >
    > "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> "Rick Merrill" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Vanguard wrote:
    >>>> "Colin Mckechnie" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:AWDte.27663$...
    >>>>
    >>>>> Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for
    >>>>> DHCP i want to put something else on the network but it will only
    >>>>> work using a static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP
    >>>>> and the other 3 DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router
    >>>>> BFRS41 or something along those lines?
    >>>>
    >>>> Unlike the D-Link that I had, the Linksys BEFSR41 does not allow
    >>>> assigning static IP addresses to specific hosts based on their MAC
    >>>> address.
    >>>
    >>> That is not the whole truth: Linsys BEFSR41 permits you to limit the
    >>> DHCP assigment of IP addresses to a RANGE! All IP outside that
    >>> range can be given as FIXED ip addresses.

    >>
    >>
    >> ... which must be assigned at the *host*, not at the router! So the
    >> Linksys does nothing to regulate which IP address gets assigned if
    >> the host already has one assigned and is NOT using DHCP. The host
    >> could use a static IP address within the range specified for use by
    >> the router's DHCP server but there is a chance for conflict. If you
    >> configure the host's TCP properties to use a static IP address high
    >> up in the router's DHCP range, the router is unlikely to ever get
    >> that high unless you actually have that many hosts: the router's DHCP
    >> server starts assigning the dynamic IP addresses from the bottom of
    >> its allocated range. Unless you are super tight for intranetwork IP
    >> addresses, there is rarely any reason to overlap your static and
    >> dynamic IP ranges.
    >>
    >> So, to be correct, the host can still assign to itself in its TCP
    >> properties a static IP address that is within the allocated range for
    >> the router's DHCP server. However, that is not recommended. If the
    >> router's DHCP server isn't managing the IP address used by a host, it
    >> doesn't necessarily have a conflict with a host using an IP address
    >> within the DHCP's server allocated IP range. You avoid the
    >> *possible* conflict by using a static IP address that the router's
    >> DHCP server is unlikely to use (i.e., high static IP addresses while
    >> the DHCP server assigns low dynamic IP addresses for a few hosts).
    >> You make it impossible for a conflict by using a static IP address
    >> that is outside the DHCP server's allocation range. The second
    >> method is safer but the first method is still possible.
    >>
    >> It still comes back to the Linksys not not having the feature to
    >> manage IP addresses by MAC address. By having the router's DHCP
    >> server manage who got a fixed IP address based on their MAC address,
    >> I could also regulate which intranetwork hosts got to talk to each
    >> other. Sure, in the Linksys, I could regulate by IP address but
    >> since they were dynamic then there was no surity which host that I
    >> was regulating. Just because I'm on a home network doesn't meant
    >> that trust all hosts in my home since many are not under my control
    >> (and I refuse to be everyone's freebie onsite PC guru). I lost
    >> several nice management features when my D-Link died and got a
    >> Linksys as its replacement (and at twice the price for less
    >> features). The firewall rules in the Linksys are less capable than in
    >> the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no rules. For
    >> example, I cannot define that a particular host can only connect to
    >> the Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain time
    >> periods. I cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN side) to
    >> be the same as ANY host connected to it but instead can only clone
    >> the MAC address of the particular host that has its admin web page
    >> opened (i.e., I have to go to the host and connect from there to the
    >> Linksys' web server to clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN
    >> side). Other features in the D-Link were missing from the Linksys,
    >> and the D-Link cost half as much, but we were in a hurry and had to
    >> get an immediate replacement that morning which meant heading off to
    >> the store instead of making an online order.
    >>
    >> I should've pushed for buying a D-Link replacement. Live and burn.

    >
    >



    Version 4 of the Linksys BEFSR41 has no firmware updates. I even called
    Linksys to find out if there were firmware updates for it just to be
    sure. Their web site lists updates but they cannot be used with version
    4 (latest) for this product. I'm screwed.
    Vanguard, Jun 21, 2005
    #14
  15. Colin Mckechnie

    Vanguard Guest

    "pcbutts1" <> wrote in message
    news:rVWte.699$...
    > "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > The firewall rules in the Linksys are less
    >> capable than in the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no
    >> rules. For example, I cannot define that a particular host can only
    >> connect to the Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain
    >> time periods. I cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN
    >> side) to be the same as ANY host connected to it but instead can only
    >> clone the MAC address of the particular host that has its admin web
    >> page opened (i.e., I have to go to the host and connect from there to
    >> the Linksys' web server to clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN
    >> side).

    >
    >
    > Maybe you should upgrade your routers firmware. My linksys does all
    > that.


    By listing the navigation through the web pages of the Linksys BEFSR41
    router, show me how to do the following:

    1. Clone the router's MAC address (on its WAN side) to be the MAC
    address of *any* powered-on host currently connected to the router. If
    there are 4 hosts connected and powered on, the Linksys lets me clone
    the MAC address of *only* the host from which I run the browser to
    connect to the Linksys' web server.

    2. Where in the Linksys router does it let me schedule when a host can
    and cannot have any connections, and whether that restriction is
    LAN-side, WAN-side, or both?

    3. Where in the Linksys' DHCP setup does it show the MAC addresses so I
    can assign a fixed IP address to that host? The host remains configured
    to use DHCP but the DHCP server in the router always assigns the same IP
    address to that particular host.

    4. Where in the Linksys can I configure that only certain hosts, by
    their IP address (which has been fixed in the router's DHCP server), can
    communicate with only certain other hosts or none of the other
    intranetwork hosts? I may want to let them all have Internet
    connectivity but none of them can communicate with each other, or I
    might want a "zone" of IP addresses that can communicate with each other
    but no other hosts can communicate with them but they all get Internet
    connectivity. I can't do that unless I can assign fixed IP addresses
    based on the MAC address of the host, and I don't want to wander around
    reconfiguring everyone's host to change its TCP properties to use static
    IP addressing, especially since they may wipe their Windows install and
    do a fresh install which defaults to dynamic addressing and I'd have to
    reconfigure them again with a static IP address. The Linksys lets me
    configure which hosts have Internet connectivity (i.e., to the WAN-side
    of the router) but it does not let me configure WHEN they get that
    connectivity nor does it let me control which local hosts can connect to
    each other or when they can connect to each other.

    5. Where in the Linksys can I configure that a certain host can only
    recieve UDP packets and not TCP packets, and do so for all ports or just
    for some ports?

    6. Where in the Linksys is the feature to perform URL filtering (i.e., I
    can block or allow based on a string in the URL)? Or to do domain
    filtering (i.e., where the URL filtering is performed only on the domain
    portion of the URL)? In the D-Link, URL and domain filtering also
    permitted wildcarding. Even the simplistic numeric-only IP address
    filtering (to block/allow external hosts) isn't available in the
    Linksys.

    My buddy has an older Linksys BEFSR41. When he got it, it did not have
    the static IP addressing which I already experienced with the D-Link
    DI-604. Later he got a firmware update to gave him this feature (but I
    don't know about any of the other features, like scheduling when a host
    can connect to other hosts or to the Internet). His was an older
    version of that unit and that was just over 2 years ago. When I bought
    this replacement unit a couple months back, it is a version 4, and there
    are no available firmware updates for it. However, you would think that
    after 2 years that a later version of their model would already have
    incorporated the features available through firmware updates to the
    older versions of the same unit.

    Go to
    http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=34&scid=29&prid=561.
    Click on the "Firmware" link. Notice it is only for version 3 of that
    model. I called to ask if that firmware update could be applied to the
    version 4 of that model. Linksys said "No".

    Firmware update available:
    BEFSR41 model version: 3
    Firmware version: 1.05.00
    Datestamp: 4/1/2004

    My router:
    BEFSR41 model version: 4
    Firmware version: 1.04.00
    Datestamp: 11/22/2004

    The datestamp for my firmware version is after the datestamp for the
    downloadable firmware update. However, my firmware version is lower
    than the downloadable firmware version and that is why I called Linksys
    to see if 1.05.00 listed for the model version 3 could be used on a
    model version 4. They said there were no firmware updates available for
    the model version 4. So my buddy that has an older model version with a
    firmware update has more features than a later model version purchased 2
    years later. Since my buddy had the fixed IP address feature after
    getting a firmware update, and since 2 years had passed, I figured that
    feature would also be available 2 years later and that's why I opted to
    get a Linksys instead of a D-Link.
    Vanguard, Jun 21, 2005
    #15
  16. Colin Mckechnie

    pcbutts1 Guest

    Oh ok it must be a hardware thing. That is one of their oldest models. Mine
    is a WRT549 the latest firmware added a bunch of shi.......stuff and
    features.

    --


    The best live web video on the internet http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com



    "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "pcbutts1" <> wrote in message
    > news:rVWte.699$...
    >> "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> The firewall rules in the Linksys are less
    >>> capable than in the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no
    >>> rules. For example, I cannot define that a particular host can only
    >>> connect to the Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain
    >>> time periods. I cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN side)
    >>> to be the same as ANY host connected to it but instead can only clone
    >>> the MAC address of the particular host that has its admin web page
    >>> opened (i.e., I have to go to the host and connect from there to the
    >>> Linksys' web server to clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN side).

    >>
    >>
    >> Maybe you should upgrade your routers firmware. My linksys does all that.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >>
    >> The best live web video on the internet http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    >> Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> "Rick Merrill" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Vanguard wrote:
    >>>>> "Colin Mckechnie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:AWDte.27663$...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for
    >>>>>> DHCP i want to put something else on the network but it will only
    >>>>>> work using a static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP
    >>>>>> and the other 3 DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router
    >>>>>> BFRS41 or something along those lines?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Unlike the D-Link that I had, the Linksys BEFSR41 does not allow
    >>>>> assigning static IP addresses to specific hosts based on their MAC
    >>>>> address.
    >>>>
    >>>> That is not the whole truth: Linsys BEFSR41 permits you to limit the
    >>>> DHCP assigment of IP addresses to a RANGE! All IP outside that range
    >>>> can be given as FIXED ip addresses.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ... which must be assigned at the *host*, not at the router! So the
    >>> Linksys does nothing to regulate which IP address gets assigned if the
    >>> host already has one assigned and is NOT using DHCP. The host could use
    >>> a static IP address within the range specified for use by the router's
    >>> DHCP server but there is a chance for conflict. If you configure the
    >>> host's TCP properties to use a static IP address high up in the router's
    >>> DHCP range, the router is unlikely to ever get that high unless you
    >>> actually have that many hosts: the router's DHCP server starts assigning
    >>> the dynamic IP addresses from the bottom of its allocated range. Unless
    >>> you are super tight for intranetwork IP addresses, there is rarely any
    >>> reason to overlap your static and dynamic IP ranges.
    >>>
    >>> So, to be correct, the host can still assign to itself in its TCP
    >>> properties a static IP address that is within the allocated range for
    >>> the router's DHCP server. However, that is not recommended. If the
    >>> router's DHCP server isn't managing the IP address used by a host, it
    >>> doesn't necessarily have a conflict with a host using an IP address
    >>> within the DHCP's server allocated IP range. You avoid the *possible*
    >>> conflict by using a static IP address that the router's DHCP server is
    >>> unlikely to use (i.e., high static IP addresses while the DHCP server
    >>> assigns low dynamic IP addresses for a few hosts). You make it
    >>> impossible for a conflict by using a static IP address that is outside
    >>> the DHCP server's allocation range. The second method is safer but the
    >>> first method is still possible.
    >>>
    >>> It still comes back to the Linksys not not having the feature to manage
    >>> IP addresses by MAC address. By having the router's DHCP server manage
    >>> who got a fixed IP address based on their MAC address, I could also
    >>> regulate which intranetwork hosts got to talk to each other. Sure, in
    >>> the Linksys, I could regulate by IP address but since they were dynamic
    >>> then there was no surity which host that I was regulating. Just because
    >>> I'm on a home network doesn't meant that trust all hosts in my home
    >>> since many are not under my control (and I refuse to be everyone's
    >>> freebie onsite PC guru). I lost several nice management features when my
    >>> D-Link died and got a Linksys as its replacement (and at twice the price
    >>> for less features). The firewall rules in the Linksys are less capable
    >>> than in the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no rules. For
    >>> example, I cannot define that a particular host can only connect to the
    >>> Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain time periods. I
    >>> cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN side) to be the same as
    >>> ANY host connected to it but instead can only clone the MAC address of
    >>> the particular host that has its admin web page opened (i.e., I have to
    >>> go to the host and connect from there to the Linksys' web server to
    >>> clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN side). Other features in the
    >>> D-Link were missing from the Linksys, and the D-Link cost half as much,
    >>> but we were in a hurry and had to get an immediate replacement that
    >>> morning which meant heading off to the store instead of making an online
    >>> order.
    >>>
    >>> I should've pushed for buying a D-Link replacement. Live and burn.

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Version 4 of the Linksys BEFSR41 has no firmware updates. I even called
    > Linksys to find out if there were firmware updates for it just to be sure.
    > Their web site lists updates but they cannot be used with version 4
    > (latest) for this product. I'm screwed.
    pcbutts1, Jun 21, 2005
    #16
  17. Colin Mckechnie

    pcbutts1 Guest

    That should be WRT54G.

    --


    The best live web video on the internet http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com



    "pcbutts1" <> wrote in message
    news:7cYte.728$...
    > Oh ok it must be a hardware thing. That is one of their oldest models.
    > Mine is a WRT549 the latest firmware added a bunch of shi.......stuff and
    > features.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > The best live web video on the internet http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    > Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com
    >
    >
    >
    > "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> "pcbutts1" <> wrote in message
    >> news:rVWte.699$...
    >>> "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>> The firewall rules in the Linksys are less
    >>>> capable than in the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no
    >>>> rules. For example, I cannot define that a particular host can only
    >>>> connect to the Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain
    >>>> time periods. I cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN side)
    >>>> to be the same as ANY host connected to it but instead can only clone
    >>>> the MAC address of the particular host that has its admin web page
    >>>> opened (i.e., I have to go to the host and connect from there to the
    >>>> Linksys' web server to clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN
    >>>> side).
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Maybe you should upgrade your routers firmware. My linksys does all
    >>> that.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> The best live web video on the internet
    >>> http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    >>> Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> "Rick Merrill" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> Vanguard wrote:
    >>>>>> "Colin Mckechnie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:AWDte.27663$...
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Ok i have a wee problem connecting a network at home
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I have 2 pc's and xbox connecting fine through a router set up for
    >>>>>>> DHCP i want to put something else on the network but it will only
    >>>>>>> work using a static IP can i set 1 of my ports to have a static IP
    >>>>>>> and the other 3 DHCP? the router is a linksys 4 port cable router
    >>>>>>> BFRS41 or something along those lines?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Unlike the D-Link that I had, the Linksys BEFSR41 does not allow
    >>>>>> assigning static IP addresses to specific hosts based on their MAC
    >>>>>> address.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That is not the whole truth: Linsys BEFSR41 permits you to limit the
    >>>>> DHCP assigment of IP addresses to a RANGE! All IP outside that range
    >>>>> can be given as FIXED ip addresses.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> ... which must be assigned at the *host*, not at the router! So the
    >>>> Linksys does nothing to regulate which IP address gets assigned if the
    >>>> host already has one assigned and is NOT using DHCP. The host could
    >>>> use a static IP address within the range specified for use by the
    >>>> router's DHCP server but there is a chance for conflict. If you
    >>>> configure the host's TCP properties to use a static IP address high up
    >>>> in the router's DHCP range, the router is unlikely to ever get that
    >>>> high unless you actually have that many hosts: the router's DHCP server
    >>>> starts assigning the dynamic IP addresses from the bottom of its
    >>>> allocated range. Unless you are super tight for intranetwork IP
    >>>> addresses, there is rarely any reason to overlap your static and
    >>>> dynamic IP ranges.
    >>>>
    >>>> So, to be correct, the host can still assign to itself in its TCP
    >>>> properties a static IP address that is within the allocated range for
    >>>> the router's DHCP server. However, that is not recommended. If the
    >>>> router's DHCP server isn't managing the IP address used by a host, it
    >>>> doesn't necessarily have a conflict with a host using an IP address
    >>>> within the DHCP's server allocated IP range. You avoid the *possible*
    >>>> conflict by using a static IP address that the router's DHCP server is
    >>>> unlikely to use (i.e., high static IP addresses while the DHCP server
    >>>> assigns low dynamic IP addresses for a few hosts). You make it
    >>>> impossible for a conflict by using a static IP address that is outside
    >>>> the DHCP server's allocation range. The second method is safer but the
    >>>> first method is still possible.
    >>>>
    >>>> It still comes back to the Linksys not not having the feature to manage
    >>>> IP addresses by MAC address. By having the router's DHCP server manage
    >>>> who got a fixed IP address based on their MAC address, I could also
    >>>> regulate which intranetwork hosts got to talk to each other. Sure, in
    >>>> the Linksys, I could regulate by IP address but since they were dynamic
    >>>> then there was no surity which host that I was regulating. Just
    >>>> because I'm on a home network doesn't meant that trust all hosts in my
    >>>> home since many are not under my control (and I refuse to be everyone's
    >>>> freebie onsite PC guru). I lost several nice management features when
    >>>> my D-Link died and got a Linksys as its replacement (and at twice the
    >>>> price for less features). The firewall rules in the Linksys are less
    >>>> capable than in the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no
    >>>> rules. For example, I cannot define that a particular host can only
    >>>> connect to the Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain
    >>>> time periods. I cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN side)
    >>>> to be the same as ANY host connected to it but instead can only clone
    >>>> the MAC address of the particular host that has its admin web page
    >>>> opened (i.e., I have to go to the host and connect from there to the
    >>>> Linksys' web server to clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN
    >>>> side). Other features in the D-Link were missing from the Linksys, and
    >>>> the D-Link cost half as much, but we were in a hurry and had to get an
    >>>> immediate replacement that morning which meant heading off to the store
    >>>> instead of making an online order.
    >>>>
    >>>> I should've pushed for buying a D-Link replacement. Live and burn.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Version 4 of the Linksys BEFSR41 has no firmware updates. I even called
    >> Linksys to find out if there were firmware updates for it just to be
    >> sure. Their web site lists updates but they cannot be used with version 4
    >> (latest) for this product. I'm screwed.

    >
    >
    pcbutts1, Jun 21, 2005
    #17
  18. Colin Mckechnie

    Duane Arnold Guest

    May I suggest that you discontinue use of the Linksys VPN solution and go
    get your D-Link. You can turn the Linksys into a *switch* and extend the
    network. :)

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Jun 21, 2005
    #18
  19. Colin Mckechnie

    pcbutts1 Guest

    I put screenshots here. You may have to save the image for a better picture.

    http://www.pcbutts1.com/downloads/links/access.jpg
    http://www.pcbutts1.com/downloads/links/access1.jpg
    http://www.pcbutts1.com/downloads/links/mac.jpg

    --


    The best live web video on the internet http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com



    "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > "pcbutts1" <> wrote in message
    > news:rVWte.699$...
    >> "Vanguard" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> The firewall rules in the Linksys are less
    >>> capable than in the D-Link, too. Fact is, the Linksys has almost no
    >>> rules. For example, I cannot define that a particular host can only
    >>> connect to the Internet or to other intranetwork hosts during certain
    >>> time periods. I cannot clone the Linksys' IP address (on its WAN side)
    >>> to be the same as ANY host connected to it but instead can only clone
    >>> the MAC address of the particular host that has its admin web page
    >>> opened (i.e., I have to go to the host and connect from there to the
    >>> Linksys' web server to clone its MAC address for the Linksys' WAN side).

    >>
    >>
    >> Maybe you should upgrade your routers firmware. My linksys does all that.

    >
    > By listing the navigation through the web pages of the Linksys BEFSR41
    > router, show me how to do the following:
    >
    > 1. Clone the router's MAC address (on its WAN side) to be the MAC address
    > of *any* powered-on host currently connected to the router. If there are
    > 4 hosts connected and powered on, the Linksys lets me clone the MAC
    > address of *only* the host from which I run the browser to connect to the
    > Linksys' web server.
    >
    > 2. Where in the Linksys router does it let me schedule when a host can and
    > cannot have any connections, and whether that restriction is LAN-side,
    > WAN-side, or both?
    >
    > 3. Where in the Linksys' DHCP setup does it show the MAC addresses so I
    > can assign a fixed IP address to that host? The host remains configured
    > to use DHCP but the DHCP server in the router always assigns the same IP
    > address to that particular host.
    >
    > 4. Where in the Linksys can I configure that only certain hosts, by their
    > IP address (which has been fixed in the router's DHCP server), can
    > communicate with only certain other hosts or none of the other
    > intranetwork hosts? I may want to let them all have Internet connectivity
    > but none of them can communicate with each other, or I might want a "zone"
    > of IP addresses that can communicate with each other but no other hosts
    > can communicate with them but they all get Internet connectivity. I can't
    > do that unless I can assign fixed IP addresses based on the MAC address of
    > the host, and I don't want to wander around reconfiguring everyone's host
    > to change its TCP properties to use static IP addressing, especially since
    > they may wipe their Windows install and do a fresh install which defaults
    > to dynamic addressing and I'd have to reconfigure them again with a static
    > IP address. The Linksys lets me configure which hosts have Internet
    > connectivity (i.e., to the WAN-side of the router) but it does not let me
    > configure WHEN they get that connectivity nor does it let me control which
    > local hosts can connect to each other or when they can connect to each
    > other.
    >
    > 5. Where in the Linksys can I configure that a certain host can only
    > recieve UDP packets and not TCP packets, and do so for all ports or just
    > for some ports?
    >
    > 6. Where in the Linksys is the feature to perform URL filtering (i.e., I
    > can block or allow based on a string in the URL)? Or to do domain
    > filtering (i.e., where the URL filtering is performed only on the domain
    > portion of the URL)? In the D-Link, URL and domain filtering also
    > permitted wildcarding. Even the simplistic numeric-only IP address
    > filtering (to block/allow external hosts) isn't available in the Linksys.
    >
    > My buddy has an older Linksys BEFSR41. When he got it, it did not have
    > the static IP addressing which I already experienced with the D-Link
    > DI-604. Later he got a firmware update to gave him this feature (but I
    > don't know about any of the other features, like scheduling when a host
    > can connect to other hosts or to the Internet). His was an older version
    > of that unit and that was just over 2 years ago. When I bought this
    > replacement unit a couple months back, it is a version 4, and there are no
    > available firmware updates for it. However, you would think that after 2
    > years that a later version of their model would already have incorporated
    > the features available through firmware updates to the older versions of
    > the same unit.
    >
    > Go to
    > http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=34&scid=29&prid=561.
    > Click on the "Firmware" link. Notice it is only for version 3 of that
    > model. I called to ask if that firmware update could be applied to the
    > version 4 of that model. Linksys said "No".
    >
    > Firmware update available:
    > BEFSR41 model version: 3
    > Firmware version: 1.05.00
    > Datestamp: 4/1/2004
    >
    > My router:
    > BEFSR41 model version: 4
    > Firmware version: 1.04.00
    > Datestamp: 11/22/2004
    >
    > The datestamp for my firmware version is after the datestamp for the
    > downloadable firmware update. However, my firmware version is lower than
    > the downloadable firmware version and that is why I called Linksys to see
    > if 1.05.00 listed for the model version 3 could be used on a model version
    > 4. They said there were no firmware updates available for the model
    > version 4. So my buddy that has an older model version with a firmware
    > update has more features than a later model version purchased 2 years
    > later. Since my buddy had the fixed IP address feature after getting a
    > firmware update, and since 2 years had passed, I figured that feature
    > would also be available 2 years later and that's why I opted to get a
    > Linksys instead of a D-Link.
    pcbutts1, Jun 21, 2005
    #19
  20. Colin Mckechnie

    Vanguard Guest

    "pcbutts1" <> wrote in message
    news:7cYte.728$...
    > Oh ok it must be a hardware thing. That is one of their oldest models.
    > Mine is a WRT549 the latest firmware added a bunch of shi.......stuff
    > and features.



    Prices from http://www.newegg.com:

    $34.50 D-Link DI-604 wired ($24.50 after $10 rebate)
    $49.99 Linksys BEFSR41 wired ($39.99 after $10 rebate)
    $69.99 Linksys WRT54G wireless ($59.99 after $10 rebate)

    The D-Link DI-604 had more features than the 64% more expensive Linksys
    BEFSR41. The 145% more expensive WRT54G is wireless and we didn't want
    wireless because of the added expense of getting wireless cards in each
    host which already had onboard or daughtercard NICs.

    It is odd (i.e., STUPID) that a later model version of their product
    doesn't provide the same features as an older version with a firmware
    update. Often the older products are still offered but not maintained,
    especially after a buyout (Cisco acquired Linksys in March 2003).
    Vanguard, Jun 21, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

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