Developing film yourself

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Sandman, May 10, 2012.

  1. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.

    I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.

    Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.

    But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).

    Do you have any "developing film for dummies" links to share? The
    basics, the tools and the process. I've found some through google, but
    I'm curious to see if you may know of any better ones :)



    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, May 10, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Sandman

    Martin Brown Guest

    On 10/05/2012 12:24, Sandman wrote:
    > I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    > - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    > Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.
    >
    > I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    > and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    > of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.
    >
    > Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    > developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    > which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.
    >
    > But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    > to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    > MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    > photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).
    >
    > Do you have any "developing film for dummies" links to share? The
    > basics, the tools and the process. I've found some through google, but
    > I'm curious to see if you may know of any better ones :)


    Developing black & white silver halide film is easy enough at home
    provided you can construct a truly dark darkroom. It just requires
    paying a bit of attention to temperature control, making up solutions
    and learning to load a developing spiral and tank in total darkness.

    Colour is generally too much like hard work with much tighter
    temperature control needed and altogether nastier chemistry.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown
    Martin Brown, May 10, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <KSNqr.3781$>,
    Martin Brown <|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    > On 10/05/2012 12:24, Sandman wrote:
    > > I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    > > - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    > > Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.
    > >
    > > I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    > > and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    > > of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.
    > >
    > > Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    > > developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    > > which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.
    > >
    > > But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    > > to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    > > MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    > > photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).
    > >
    > > Do you have any "developing film for dummies" links to share? The
    > > basics, the tools and the process. I've found some through google, but
    > > I'm curious to see if you may know of any better ones :)

    >
    > Developing black & white silver halide film is easy enough at home
    > provided you can construct a truly dark darkroom. It just requires
    > paying a bit of attention to temperature control, making up solutions
    > and learning to load a developing spiral and tank in total darkness.
    >
    > Colour is generally too much like hard work with much tighter
    > temperature control needed and altogether nastier chemistry.


    Oh, I didn't realize there was a difference, so you would recommend
    that color film should be developed in a dedicated company?


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, May 10, 2012
    #3
  4. Sandman

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > In article <KSNqr.3781$>,
    > Martin Brown <|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    > > On 10/05/2012 12:24, Sandman wrote:
    > > > I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    > > > - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    > > > Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.
    > > >
    > > > I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    > > > and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    > > > of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.
    > > >
    > > > Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    > > > developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    > > > which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.
    > > >
    > > > But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    > > > to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    > > > MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    > > > photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).
    > > >
    > > > Do you have any "developing film for dummies" links to share? The
    > > > basics, the tools and the process. I've found some through google, but
    > > > I'm curious to see if you may know of any better ones :)

    > >
    > > Developing black & white silver halide film is easy enough at home
    > > provided you can construct a truly dark darkroom. It just requires
    > > paying a bit of attention to temperature control, making up solutions
    > > and learning to load a developing spiral and tank in total darkness.
    > >
    > > Colour is generally too much like hard work with much tighter
    > > temperature control needed and altogether nastier chemistry.

    >
    > Oh, I didn't realize there was a difference, so you would recommend
    > that color film should be developed in a dedicated company?


    Generally yes, although once you're set up for blacka and white, you can
    get a Tetenal C-41 chemistry kit for about 20 bucks, so you might want
    to give it a try and see if you like it.
    J. Clarke, May 10, 2012
    #4
  5. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <>,
    "J. Clarke" <> wrote:

    > > > Colour is generally too much like hard work with much tighter
    > > > temperature control needed and altogether nastier chemistry.

    > >
    > > Oh, I didn't realize there was a difference, so you would recommend
    > > that color film should be developed in a dedicated company?

    >
    > Generally yes, although once you're set up for blacka and white, you can
    > get a Tetenal C-41 chemistry kit for about 20 bucks, so you might want
    > to give it a try and see if you like it.


    Gotcha! Thanks for the input :)


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, May 10, 2012
    #5
  6. Sandman <> writes:

    > I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    > - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    > Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.
    >
    > I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    > and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    > of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.
    >
    > Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    > developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    > which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.
    >
    > But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    > to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    > MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    > photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).


    The big divide is B&W vs. color.

    There are strong arguments for developing B&W films yourself. The range
    of developers available gives you lots of options, and varying
    developing procedures gives you useful control over what you're doing.

    The arguments for developing color films yourself are much much much
    smaller. The color processes are designed for automated equipment, and
    depend on rather precise temperature control. And there isn't nearly as
    much flexibility and variety, there's less benefit available.

    B&W is simple; you need a tank and reels, some measuring graduates of
    suitable size, a dishpan for the water bath (not strictly necessary, but
    some temp control is quite desirable), chemicals, and a place to hang
    the film to dry.

    Plan to expend at least two rolls of film in practicing loading the tank
    *before risking a real roll*. Do it in the light until you understand
    it, then do it in the dark until you're comfortable with it in the dark.

    Oh, the big religious choice in tank and reel systems is "plastic
    vs. stainless steel". The good plastic tanks and reels work fine, and
    are easier to load if everything goes well. It is *absolutely
    essential* that the reels be *absolutely* dry when you load them, or the
    film will bind and you'll be stuck. For low-volume recreational use
    this isn't much of a problem (if you're doing multiple batches in a day,
    it IS).

    When I was doing B&W as my main film and processing it all myself, it
    was a *serious* problem, and I learned to load onto stainless steel
    reels. That was quicker, once learned, and also didn't have the abrupt
    failure conditions with a drop of water left on the metal. I didn't
    have a fully dark room (dark enough for printing, but not dark enough
    for film), so I loaded tanks in a "changing bag"; which meant that on a
    hot day my hands got sweaty, and I could have the "film gets damp and
    sticky" problems even if my reels were dry when I started. For
    occasional recreational use, a changing bag is nearly certainly the best
    approach for you, too. Getting a room "film dark" is HARD.

    Also the modern, good, plastic tanks and reels hadn't been invented when
    I started doing darkroom work.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
    David Dyer-Bennet, May 10, 2012
    #6
  7. Sandman

    nospam Guest

    In article <KSNqr.3781$>, Martin Brown
    <|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    > > Do you have any "developing film for dummies" links to share? The
    > > basics, the tools and the process. I've found some through google, but
    > > I'm curious to see if you may know of any better ones :)

    >
    > Developing black & white silver halide film is easy enough at home
    > provided you can construct a truly dark darkroom. It just requires
    > paying a bit of attention to temperature control, making up solutions
    > and learning to load a developing spiral and tank in total darkness.


    a darkroom is not needed for film developing. all that's needed is a
    changing bag and a developing tank.

    put the film and tank into the changing bag, insert your arms, then
    load the tank and cover it. once that's done, the rest can be done in
    ordinary room light.

    > Colour is generally too much like hard work with much tighter
    > temperature control needed and altogether nastier chemistry.


    definitely.
    nospam, May 10, 2012
    #7
  8. Sandman

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Sandman
    <> wrote:

    > > Colour is generally too much like hard work with much tighter
    > > temperature control needed and altogether nastier chemistry.

    >
    > Oh, I didn't realize there was a difference, so you would recommend
    > that color film should be developed in a dedicated company?


    absolutely.

    don't even think about colour film developing until you're comfortable
    with b/w film developing.
    nospam, May 10, 2012
    #8
  9. Sandman

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>, says...
    >
    > Sandman <> writes:
    >
    > > I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    > > - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    > > Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.
    > >
    > > I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    > > and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    > > of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.
    > >
    > > Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    > > developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    > > which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.
    > >
    > > But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    > > to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    > > MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    > > photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).

    >
    > The big divide is B&W vs. color.
    >
    > There are strong arguments for developing B&W films yourself. The range
    > of developers available gives you lots of options, and varying
    > developing procedures gives you useful control over what you're doing.
    >
    > The arguments for developing color films yourself are much much much
    > smaller. The color processes are designed for automated equipment, and
    > depend on rather precise temperature control. And there isn't nearly as
    > much flexibility and variety, there's less benefit available.
    >
    > B&W is simple; you need a tank and reels, some measuring graduates of
    > suitable size, a dishpan for the water bath (not strictly necessary, but
    > some temp control is quite desirable), chemicals, and a place to hang
    > the film to dry.
    >
    > Plan to expend at least two rolls of film in practicing loading the tank
    > *before risking a real roll*. Do it in the light until you understand
    > it, then do it in the dark until you're comfortable with it in the dark.
    >
    > Oh, the big religious choice in tank and reel systems is "plastic
    > vs. stainless steel". The good plastic tanks and reels work fine, and
    > are easier to load if everything goes well. It is *absolutely
    > essential* that the reels be *absolutely* dry when you load them, or the
    > film will bind and you'll be stuck. For low-volume recreational use
    > this isn't much of a problem (if you're doing multiple batches in a day,
    > it IS).
    >
    > When I was doing B&W as my main film and processing it all myself, it
    > was a *serious* problem, and I learned to load onto stainless steel
    > reels. That was quicker, once learned, and also didn't have the abrupt
    > failure conditions with a drop of water left on the metal. I didn't
    > have a fully dark room (dark enough for printing, but not dark enough
    > for film), so I loaded tanks in a "changing bag"; which meant that on a
    > hot day my hands got sweaty, and I could have the "film gets damp and
    > sticky" problems even if my reels were dry when I started. For
    > occasional recreational use, a changing bag is nearly certainly the best
    > approach for you, too. Getting a room "film dark" is HARD.


    Depends on where you're located. I didn't have any problem when I was
    teenager. Lived way out in the country--turn all the lights out at 11
    PM on a moonless night and it was dark enough.
    J. Clarke, May 10, 2012
    #9
  10. George Kerby <> writes:

    > On 5/10/12 9:57 AM, in article , "David
    > Dyer-Bennet" <> wrote:


    >> I didn't have a fully dark room (dark enough for printing, but not
    >> dark enough for film), so I loaded tanks in a "changing bag"; which
    >> meant that on a hot day my hands got sweaty, and I could have the
    >> "film gets damp and sticky" problems even if my reels were dry when I
    >> started. For occasional recreational use, a changing bag is nearly
    >> certainly the best approach for you, too. Getting a room "film dark"
    >> is HARD.

    >
    > You want problems? Try loading and unloading 8" x 10" film holders in one of
    > those changing bags. Not THAT'S a fun thing to do without making "moons" (
    > an artifact caused by flexing and bending a small area in the sheet when
    > removing or loading it in the holder).


    Ouch. I never went up to 8x10. I've loaded 4x5 holders fairly
    recently, but those are easy, the film base is stiff enough it's easy to
    avoid kinking it (I'm more familiar with the problem from handling large
    prints, but of course the same thing happens to film).
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
    David Dyer-Bennet, May 10, 2012
    #10
  11. On 5/10/2012 5:20 PM, Alan Browne wrote:
    > On 2012-05-10 07:24 , Sandman wrote:
    >> I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    >> - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    >> Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.
    >>
    >> I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    >> and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    >> of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.
    >>
    >> Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    >> developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    >> which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.
    >>
    >> But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    >> to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    >> MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    >> photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).
    >>
    >> Do you have any "developing film for dummies" links to share? The
    >> basics, the tools and the process. I've found some through google, but
    >> I'm curious to see if you may know of any better ones :)

    >
    > The ones you found with Google are probably okay - read several and
    > write your own procedure based on your equipment. When I develop I first
    > write down all my key timings. For B&W, the developer is really the only
    > thing that is time critical. Fixer should be done per instructions but
    > no harm if under/over done by some amount.
    >
    > The stop bath can be off either way by a large margin (and you can use
    > water and white vinegar instead - just to show how little importance
    > there is (some people just use a lot of water an no stop bath at all)).
    >
    > Also sparing amounts of photo flo helps for clean clear negatives. (I
    > use half the Kodak recommended when diluting).
    >
    > B&W is pretty easy. No darkroom needed (changing bag or a dark room to
    > load the reel and plunk it in the can is all you need).
    >
    > For E-6, if you go that route, the main thing to focus on is chemistry
    > temperature: it must be consistent and accurate: 38°C ± 0.5°C. A water
    > 'bath' to hold all the chemical bottles so their temperature is right is
    > the main thing. An accurate thermometer is a necessity.
    >
    > (In B&W temperatures should be close to 20°C but you can compensate for
    > temperature difference with a change in development time. No such
    > compensation is mentioned in E-6 processes (that I know of)).
    >
    > As to scanning, make sure your film dries flat. This is hard to do.
    > Scanning film that is not flat is horrible. Anti Newton ring glass is a
    > two edged sword (it softens the image) and if the film is not nearly
    > flat you'll get Newton rings in any case (fewer, fainter, but still there).
    >

    I developed color transparency (120) film exactly once when some
    graduate student friends bought the necessary chemicals in bulk for the
    Belgian Gevacolor. It was successful but a tedious process and I only
    developed black and white film after that. Once you got the hang of
    loading the stainless steel reel in the dark, it was not difficult.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
    James Silverton, May 10, 2012
    #11
  12. Sandman

    PeterN Guest

    On 5/10/2012 7:24 AM, Sandman wrote:
    > I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    > - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    > Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.
    >
    > I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    > and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    > of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.
    >
    > Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    > developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    > which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.
    >
    > But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    > to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    > MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    > photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).
    >
    > Do you have any "developing film for dummies" links to share? The
    > basics, the tools and the process. I've found some through google, but
    > I'm curious to see if you may know of any better ones :)
    >
    >
    >


    I used to develop both color and BW. I cannot find my old notes, but
    IIRC I could vary the contrast and speed of BW film, within limits, by
    varying the chemical composition of my developer and temperature.
    Yes, I often made my own developer from scratch, and would vary the
    basic formulas as found in my Chemical Rubber Handbook, (35ht edition.)
    However, I used pre-mixed chemicals for color.

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, May 11, 2012
    #12
  13. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <>,
    David Dyer-Bennet <> wrote:

    > Sandman <> writes:
    >
    > > I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    > > - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    > > Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.
    > >
    > > I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    > > and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    > > of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.
    > >
    > > Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    > > developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    > > which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.
    > >
    > > But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    > > to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    > > MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    > > photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).

    >
    > The big divide is B&W vs. color.
    >
    > There are strong arguments for developing B&W films yourself. The range
    > of developers available gives you lots of options, and varying
    > developing procedures gives you useful control over what you're doing.
    >
    > The arguments for developing color films yourself are much much much
    > smaller. The color processes are designed for automated equipment, and
    > depend on rather precise temperature control. And there isn't nearly as
    > much flexibility and variety, there's less benefit available.
    >
    > B&W is simple; you need a tank and reels, some measuring graduates of
    > suitable size, a dishpan for the water bath (not strictly necessary, but
    > some temp control is quite desirable), chemicals, and a place to hang
    > the film to dry.
    >
    > Plan to expend at least two rolls of film in practicing loading the tank
    > *before risking a real roll*. Do it in the light until you understand
    > it, then do it in the dark until you're comfortable with it in the dark.
    >
    > Oh, the big religious choice in tank and reel systems is "plastic
    > vs. stainless steel". The good plastic tanks and reels work fine, and
    > are easier to load if everything goes well. It is *absolutely
    > essential* that the reels be *absolutely* dry when you load them, or the
    > film will bind and you'll be stuck. For low-volume recreational use
    > this isn't much of a problem (if you're doing multiple batches in a day,
    > it IS).
    >
    > When I was doing B&W as my main film and processing it all myself, it
    > was a *serious* problem, and I learned to load onto stainless steel
    > reels. That was quicker, once learned, and also didn't have the abrupt
    > failure conditions with a drop of water left on the metal. I didn't
    > have a fully dark room (dark enough for printing, but not dark enough
    > for film), so I loaded tanks in a "changing bag"; which meant that on a
    > hot day my hands got sweaty, and I could have the "film gets damp and
    > sticky" problems even if my reels were dry when I started. For
    > occasional recreational use, a changing bag is nearly certainly the best
    > approach for you, too. Getting a room "film dark" is HARD.
    >
    > Also the modern, good, plastic tanks and reels hadn't been invented when
    > I started doing darkroom work.


    Thanks a lot for sharing your experience! Now I'm eager to try it out
    :)


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, May 11, 2012
    #13
  14. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <100520121526123778%>,
    nospam <> wrote:

    > In article <>, Sandman
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > > Colour is generally too much like hard work with much tighter
    > > > temperature control needed and altogether nastier chemistry.

    > >
    > > Oh, I didn't realize there was a difference, so you would recommend
    > > that color film should be developed in a dedicated company?

    >
    > absolutely.
    >
    > don't even think about colour film developing until you're comfortable
    > with b/w film developing.


    Gotcha, thanks


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, May 11, 2012
    #14
  15. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > On 2012-05-10 07:24 , Sandman wrote:
    > > I know, I know - lots of questions. And the same disclaimer as before
    > > - I'm a prosumer hobby photographer that just recently bought a used
    > > Mamiya 645 Pro TL medium format camera with a 120 film back piece.
    > >
    > > I have photographed analog in the past, but that was a long time ago,
    > > and I'm relearning most of it now, albeith I haven't yet had delivery
    > > of the actual film so I haven't been able to shoot any as of yet.
    > >
    > > Still, a thought that keeps popping up is the possibility of
    > > developing the film myself. My studio has a shower room adjacent to it
    > > which could hold temporary gear for developing film I gather.
    > >
    > > But, what exactly is it that I need? Considering that I may just want
    > > to develop the negatives for scanning them in a flatbed scanner with a
    > > MF 120-film insert (Epson V700 for instance) and not enlarge them unto
    > > photo paper (although, that may be interesting later on).
    > >
    > > Do you have any "developing film for dummies" links to share? The
    > > basics, the tools and the process. I've found some through google, but
    > > I'm curious to see if you may know of any better ones :)

    >
    > The ones you found with Google are probably okay - read several and
    > write your own procedure based on your equipment. When I develop I
    > first write down all my key timings. For B&W, the developer is really
    > the only thing that is time critical. Fixer should be done per
    > instructions but no harm if under/over done by some amount.
    >
    > The stop bath can be off either way by a large margin (and you can use
    > water and white vinegar instead - just to show how little importance
    > there is (some people just use a lot of water an no stop bath at all)).
    >
    > Also sparing amounts of photo flo helps for clean clear negatives. (I
    > use half the Kodak recommended when diluting).
    >
    > B&W is pretty easy. No darkroom needed (changing bag or a dark room to
    > load the reel and plunk it in the can is all you need).


    Oh, I didn't realize. So if I got this right, afetr having shoot a
    reel of B/W film, I could move it to a tank in a changing bag, and all
    other steps can take place in normal light? I think I had that process
    mixed up somewhat then.

    > As to scanning, make sure your film dries flat. This is hard to do.
    > Scanning film that is not flat is horrible. Anti Newton ring glass is a
    > two edged sword (it softens the image) and if the film is not nearly
    > flat you'll get Newton rings in any case (fewer, fainter, but still there).


    Right, that could be a problem of course. Someone recommended this:

    http://www.betterscanning.com/scanning/models/vseries.html

    As a means to make the negatives flat in the scanner. Those are
    inserts that fit the Epson V700 flatbed scanner (which itself has a
    120 film holder, but I gather these are better).

    Thanks for your input! Greatly appreciated!


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, May 11, 2012
    #15
  16. Sandman

    Joe Makowiec Guest

    On 11 May 2012 in rec.photo.digital, Sandman wrote:

    > Oh, I didn't realize. So if I got this right, afetr having shoot a
    > reel of B/W film, I could move it to a tank in a changing bag, and all
    > other steps can take place in normal light? I think I had that process
    > mixed up somewhat then.


    Yes. Most (all?) developing tanks are 'daylight' tanks - the top has
    light baffles which allow liquid through, but not light.

    You may not even need the changing bag. I always found that if I had a
    closet large enough to fit into, that was sufficiently dark even for
    Tri-X (ISO 400). If you load the tank during daylight hours, you may
    want to block the bottom of the door with a towel.

    --
    Joe Makowiec
    http://makowiec.org/
    Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
    Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
    Joe Makowiec, May 11, 2012
    #16
  17. Joe Makowiec <> writes:

    > On 11 May 2012 in rec.photo.digital, Sandman wrote:
    >
    >> Oh, I didn't realize. So if I got this right, afetr having shoot a
    >> reel of B/W film, I could move it to a tank in a changing bag, and all
    >> other steps can take place in normal light? I think I had that process
    >> mixed up somewhat then.

    >
    > Yes. Most (all?) developing tanks are 'daylight' tanks - the top has
    > light baffles which allow liquid through, but not light.


    Yep. If you're developing sheet film, the daylight options are slimmer
    (no really good ones I know of).

    > You may not even need the changing bag. I always found that if I had a
    > closet large enough to fit into, that was sufficiently dark even for
    > Tri-X (ISO 400). If you load the tank during daylight hours, you may
    > want to block the bottom of the door with a towel.


    Yes, if you're willing to take advantage of night, and limit yourself to
    when the light cooperates, it gets much easier. But you really do need
    it *dark*; you need to sit there for 7 minutes or so and not be able to
    see any light at all to be fully safe (I often used very high-speed
    film, so my standards are perhaps extreme).
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
    David Dyer-Bennet, May 11, 2012
    #17
  18. On 5/11/2012 9:47 AM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > Joe Makowiec<> writes:
    >
    >> On 11 May 2012 in rec.photo.digital, Sandman wrote:
    >>
    >>> Oh, I didn't realize. So if I got this right, afetr having shoot a
    >>> reel of B/W film, I could move it to a tank in a changing bag, and all
    >>> other steps can take place in normal light? I think I had that process
    >>> mixed up somewhat then.

    >>
    >> Yes. Most (all?) developing tanks are 'daylight' tanks - the top has
    >> light baffles which allow liquid through, but not light.

    >
    > Yep. If you're developing sheet film, the daylight options are slimmer
    > (no really good ones I know of).
    >


    There are similar daylight developing tanks for sheet that work just fine.
    Some say they cause uneven development, but my tests showed otherwise.

    Doug McDonald
    Doug McDonald, May 12, 2012
    #18
  19. Sandman

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <jomjbb$fd9$>, says...
    >
    > On 5/11/2012 9:47 AM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > > Joe Makowiec<> writes:
    > >
    > >> On 11 May 2012 in rec.photo.digital, Sandman wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Oh, I didn't realize. So if I got this right, afetr having shoot a
    > >>> reel of B/W film, I could move it to a tank in a changing bag, and all
    > >>> other steps can take place in normal light? I think I had that process
    > >>> mixed up somewhat then.
    > >>
    > >> Yes. Most (all?) developing tanks are 'daylight' tanks - the top has
    > >> light baffles which allow liquid through, but not light.

    > >
    > > Yep. If you're developing sheet film, the daylight options are slimmer
    > > (no really good ones I know of).
    > >

    >
    > There are similar daylight developing tanks for sheet that work just fine.
    > Some say they cause uneven development, but my tests showed otherwise.


    My parents had a photo of me on a donkey taken in Tijuana with a Speed
    Graphic (or something of a like or similar nature--I was about 8, I
    remember it being a sheet film camera with a bellows but that's about
    all) and processed while we waited by a Mexican kid working on the cart
    behind the donkey. Last time I saw it, about 40 years later, it was
    still fine. Obviously the kid had adquate kit for the purpose.
    J. Clarke, May 12, 2012
    #19
  20. On 11.05.2012 06:49, Mxsmanic wrote:
    > The main ingredient of typical developers
    > (hydroquinone) is used by women in some parts of the world to lighten their
    > skin


    They ought to spend more time in the dark room instead. ;-)

    --
    One computer and three operating systems, not the other way round.
    One wife and many hotels, not the other way round ! ;-)
    Laszlo Lebrun, May 14, 2012
    #20
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