determining the reason for slow network speed in office

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by g_1, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of
    22000kbps(I know it is high, but the college has some gigabit network
    which provides such high speed). We are connected through a backbone
    (which has a speed of 21000kbps) and have a Fiber Ethernet Adapter in
    our machines. I don't know much on how to trace the reason for slow
    speed. We have a IT support department in our college, but they are
    least worried about our slow speed. We have told them 7 times in past
    2 months, but no response from them.

    I guess, a Fiber Ethernet Adapter(Allied Telesyn AT-2701FX PCI 100Mb
    Fiber Ethernet Adapter) can support speeds lot more than we are
    getting.

    The backbone is something we don't control. So, when I am told it
    provides speed of 21000kbps I have to just believe it. Is there a way
    to measure it?

    The switches in the office are under lock and key in a shelf where the
    key is with the IT department for college.

    The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is
    no adware, spyware or unwanted programs which are causing the slow
    speed or using the network bandwidth. The machines have no virus. They
    run a virus scanner whose definitions are updated daily. They run
    Windows XP, have a speed of 2.79GHz and 1GB of RAM.

    Question is, could the switches be the cause of slow speed? How can I
    verify they are the cause and not something else? Can I run some tests
    for that without having physical access to it?

    Can someone please clarify?

    Thanks a lot.
    g_1, Oct 29, 2009
    #1
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  2. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    On Oct 28, 10:04 pm, g_1 <> wrote:
    > Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    > 269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of
    > 22000kbps(I know it is high, but the college has some gigabit network
    > which provides such high speed). We are connected through a backbone
    > (which has a speed of 21000kbps) and have a Fiber Ethernet Adapter in
    > our machines. I don't know much on how to trace the reason for slow
    > speed. We have a IT support department in our college, but they are
    > least worried about our slow speed. We have told them 7 times in past
    > 2 months, but no response from them.
    >
    > I guess, a Fiber Ethernet Adapter(Allied Telesyn AT-2701FX PCI 100Mb
    > Fiber Ethernet Adapter) can support speeds lot more than we are
    > getting.
    >
    > The backbone is something we don't control. So, when I am told it
    > provides speed of 21000kbps I have to just believe it. Is there a way
    > to measure it?
    >
    > The switches in the office are under lock and key in a shelf where the
    > key is with the IT department for college.
    >
    > The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is
    > no adware, spyware or unwanted programs which are causing the slow
    > speed or using the network bandwidth. The machines have no virus. They
    > run a virus scanner whose definitions are updated daily. They run
    > Windows XP, have a speed of 2.79GHz and 1GB of RAM.
    >
    > Question is, could the switches be the cause of slow speed? How can I
    > verify they are the cause and not something else? Can I run some tests
    > for that without having physical access to it?
    >
    > Can someone please clarify?
    >
    > Thanks a lot.


    And, yes this slow speed was a problem since past two years. We did
    not do
    something to the network to cause any disruption.
    g_1, Oct 29, 2009
    #2
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  3. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    On Oct 28, 10:06 pm, g_1 <> wrote:
    > On Oct 28, 10:04 pm, g_1 <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    > > 269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of
    > > 22000kbps(I know it is high, but the college has some gigabit network
    > > which provides such high speed). We are connected through a backbone
    > > (which has a speed of 21000kbps) and have a Fiber Ethernet Adapter in
    > > our machines. I don't know much on how to trace the reason for slow
    > > speed. We have a IT support department in our college, but they are
    > > least worried about our slow speed. We have told them 7 times in past
    > > 2 months, but no response from them.

    >
    > > I guess, a Fiber Ethernet Adapter(Allied Telesyn AT-2701FX PCI 100Mb
    > > Fiber Ethernet Adapter) can support speeds lot more than we are
    > > getting.

    >
    > > The backbone is something we don't control. So, when I am told it
    > > provides speed of 21000kbps I have to just believe it. Is there a way
    > > to measure it?

    >
    > > The switches in the office are under lock and key in a shelf where the
    > > key is with the IT department for college.

    >
    > > The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is
    > > no adware, spyware or unwanted programs which are causing the slow
    > > speed or using the network bandwidth. The machines have no virus. They
    > > run a virus scanner whose definitions are updated daily. They run
    > > Windows XP, have a speed of 2.79GHz and 1GB of RAM.

    >
    > > Question is, could the switches be the cause of slow speed? How can I
    > > verify they are the cause and not something else? Can I run some tests
    > > for that without having physical access to it?

    >
    > > Can someone please clarify?

    >
    > > Thanks a lot.

    >
    > And, yes this slow speed was a problem since past two years. We did
    > not do
    > something to the network to cause any disruption.


    By switches, I meant the network switches in above post
    g_1, Oct 29, 2009
    #3
  4. g_1

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    g_1 wrote:
    > Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    > 269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of
    > 22000kbps(I know it is high, but the college has some gigabit network
    > which provides such high speed). We are connected through a backbone
    > (which has a speed of 21000kbps) and have a Fiber Ethernet Adapter in
    > our machines. I don't know much on how to trace the reason for slow
    > speed. We have a IT support department in our college, but they are
    > least worried about our slow speed. We have told them 7 times in past
    > 2 months, but no response from them.
    >
    > I guess, a Fiber Ethernet Adapter(Allied Telesyn AT-2701FX PCI 100Mb
    > Fiber Ethernet Adapter) can support speeds lot more than we are
    > getting.
    >
    > The backbone is something we don't control. So, when I am told it
    > provides speed of 21000kbps I have to just believe it. Is there a way
    > to measure it?
    >
    > The switches in the office are under lock and key in a shelf where the
    > key is with the IT department for college.
    >
    > The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is
    > no adware, spyware or unwanted programs which are causing the slow
    > speed or using the network bandwidth. The machines have no virus. They
    > run a virus scanner whose definitions are updated daily. They run
    > Windows XP, have a speed of 2.79GHz and 1GB of RAM.
    >
    > Question is, could the switches be the cause of slow speed? How can I
    > verify they are the cause and not something else? Can I run some tests
    > for that without having physical access to it?
    >
    > Can someone please clarify?


    Your bandwidth could be throttled by the switches or something further
    up the chain. Either way it will be controlled by the IT department and
    there will be very little you can do about it. If it is having a
    detrimental effect on your productivity then I'd suggest getting your
    head of department to talk to the head of the IT department and get it
    sorted out.

    On the other hand, if you are just a bunch of whinging moaners who don't
    need the bandwidth to do your job and keep complaining to the IT
    department, you might find that it gets slower and slower. Try taking
    chocolate biscuits to the IT team and making friends with them.
    Desk Rabbit, Oct 29, 2009
    #4
  5. Desk Rabbit wrote:
    > g_1 wrote:
    >> Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    >> 269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of
    >> 22000kbps(I know it is high, but the college has some gigabit network
    >> which provides such high speed). We are connected through a backbone
    >> (which has a speed of 21000kbps) and have a Fiber Ethernet Adapter in
    >> our machines. I don't know much on how to trace the reason for slow
    >> speed. We have a IT support department in our college, but they are
    >> least worried about our slow speed. We have told them 7 times in past
    >> 2 months, but no response from them.
    >>
    >> I guess, a Fiber Ethernet Adapter(Allied Telesyn AT-2701FX PCI 100Mb
    >> Fiber Ethernet Adapter) can support speeds lot more than we are
    >> getting.
    >>
    >> The backbone is something we don't control. So, when I am told it
    >> provides speed of 21000kbps I have to just believe it. Is there a way
    >> to measure it?
    >>
    >> The switches in the office are under lock and key in a shelf where the
    >> key is with the IT department for college.
    >>
    >> The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is
    >> no adware, spyware or unwanted programs which are causing the slow
    >> speed or using the network bandwidth. The machines have no virus. They
    >> run a virus scanner whose definitions are updated daily. They run
    >> Windows XP, have a speed of 2.79GHz and 1GB of RAM.
    >>
    >> Question is, could the switches be the cause of slow speed? How can I
    >> verify they are the cause and not something else? Can I run some tests
    >> for that without having physical access to it?
    >>
    >> Can someone please clarify?

    >
    > Your bandwidth could be throttled by the switches or something further
    > up the chain. Either way it will be controlled by the IT department and
    > there will be very little you can do about it. If it is having a
    > detrimental effect on your productivity then I'd suggest getting your
    > head of department to talk to the head of the IT department and get it
    > sorted out.
    >
    > On the other hand, if you are just a bunch of whinging moaners who don't
    > need the bandwidth to do your job and keep complaining to the IT
    > department, you might find that it gets slower and slower. Try taking
    > chocolate biscuits to the IT team and making friends with them.


    I'd suggest a shotgun. Much more persuasive ;)

    <snicker>

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    §ñühw¤£f, Oct 29, 2009
    #5
  6. g_1

    why? Guest

    On Wed, 28 Oct 2009 20:04:32 -0700 (PDT), g_1 wrote:

    >Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    >269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of


    You got this figure how?
    [0.269Mbps]

    Of course you don't say how far away from you the 'download server' is.

    >22000kbps(I know it is high, but the college has some gigabit network

    [22Mbps]

    [Gigabit 1000000kbps, 1000Mbps, 1Gbps]

    So the 22 is way lower.

    >which provides such high speed). We are connected through a backbone
    >(which has a speed of 21000kbps) and have a Fiber Ethernet Adapter in


    That backbone is 1000kbps slower then above :) doesn't sound right.

    >our machines. I don't know much on how to trace the reason for slow


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traceroute
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ping

    >speed. We have a IT support department in our college, but they are
    >least worried about our slow speed. We have told them 7 times in past


    Ha, my users say this as well (since I am the IT guy) when the %usage of
    a GigEth link is 3-12% for a month, mostly less then 5% it's usually
    something else causing the issue. Hence the heavy use of MRTG to graph
    bandwidth on all the backbone links.

    >2 months, but no response from them.


    Only they can really check this out.

    >I guess, a Fiber Ethernet Adapter(Allied Telesyn AT-2701FX PCI 100Mb
    >Fiber Ethernet Adapter) can support speeds lot more than we are
    >getting.


    Yes, 100Mbps is 100000kbps

    Of course the 1000Mbps, 100Mbps are all best performance max values
    usually not obtainable by 1 download.

    >The backbone is something we don't control. So, when I am told it


    Sounds like a good idea :)

    >provides speed of 21000kbps I have to just believe it. Is there a way
    >to measure it?


    2 PCs in the appropriate place on the link and, well there are lots of
    speed tests. Generally you have to know how and where things like
    servers are. This way you can pick points where the traffic has to go
    over the backbone.

    >The switches in the office are under lock and key in a shelf where the
    >key is with the IT department for college.


    Another good idea, I do this to them as well ;-)

    >The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is
    >no adware, spyware or unwanted programs which are causing the slow


    Again how?

    >speed or using the network bandwidth. The machines have no virus. They


    Again how?

    >run a virus scanner whose definitions are updated daily. They run
    >Windows XP, have a speed of 2.79GHz and 1GB of RAM.
    >
    >Question is, could the switches be the cause of slow speed? How can I


    Perhaps, but less likely since it's fiber, but even then there may be
    mismatches on link settings at either end (NIC adapter settings).

    >verify they are the cause and not something else? Can I run some tests
    >for that without having physical access to it?


    If you have 2 PCs in the same room you can time a file transfer between
    them. Then PCs in different rooms. perhaps that would be across 2
    switches over a short bit of the backbone.

    >Can someone please clarify?


    Not really, you left out a lot of info.

    There could be QoS throttling?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_of_service
    could be bandwidth maxed out, routing , faulty bit of fiber, failing
    laser in an uplink adapter.

    >Thanks a lot.


    Me
    why?, Oct 29, 2009
    #6
  7. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    On Oct 29, 1:23 am, No Spam <> wrote:
    > In article
    > <>
    >
    >
    >
    > g_1 <> wrote:
    > >On Oct 28, 10:06 pm, g_1 <> wrote:
    > >> On Oct 28, 10:04 pm, g_1 <> wrote:

    >
    > >> > Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    > >> > 269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of
    > >> > 22000kbps(I know it is high, but the college has some gigabit network
    > >> > which provides such high speed). We are connected through a backbone
    > >> > (which has a speed of 21000kbps) and have a Fiber Ethernet Adapter in
    > >> > our machines. I don't know much on how to trace the reason for slow
    > >> > speed. We have a IT support department in our college, but they are
    > >> > least worried about our slow speed. We have told them 7 times in past
    > >> > 2 months, but no response from them.

    >
    > >> > I guess, a Fiber Ethernet Adapter(Allied Telesyn AT-2701FX PCI 100Mb
    > >> > Fiber Ethernet Adapter) can support speeds lot more than we are
    > >> > getting.

    >
    > >> > The backbone is something we don't control. So, when I am told it
    > >> > provides speed of 21000kbps I have to just believe it. Is there a way
    > >> > to measure it?

    >
    > >> > The switches in the office are under lock and key in a shelf where the
    > >> > key is with the IT department for college.

    >
    > >> > The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is
    > >> > no adware, spyware or unwanted programs which are causing the slow
    > >> > speed or using the network bandwidth. The machines have no virus. They
    > >> > run a virus scanner whose definitions are updated daily. They run
    > >> > Windows XP, have a speed of 2.79GHz and 1GB of RAM.

    >
    > >> > Question is, could the switches be the cause of slow speed? How can I
    > >> > verify they are the cause and not something else? Can I run some tests
    > >> > for that without having physical access to it?

    >
    > >> > Can someone please clarify?

    >
    > >> > Thanks a lot.

    >
    > >> And, yes this slow speed was a problem since past two years. We did
    > >> not do
    > >> something to the network to cause any disruption.

    >
    > >By switches, I meant the network switches in above post

    >
    > Do a tracerout from one of the workstations to your gateway.
    >
    > Do you have Linux installed somewhere?
    > If so, use mtr.
    > For documentation about mtr, see here.
    >
    > http://man.he.net/man8/mtr
    >
    > On Windows, here is a port of mtr.
    >
    > http://winmtr.sourceforge.net0
    >

    Thanks, this is what a traceroute to Yahoo.com shows

    |------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    | WinMTR
    statistics |
    | Host - % | Sent | Recv | Best
    | Avrg | Wrst | Last |
    |------------------------------------------------|------|------|------|------|------|------|
    | MyIPaddress - 0 | 119 | 119 | 0 |
    0 | 16 | 0 |
    | CollegeIPSubnet - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0
    | 0 | 16 | 0 |
    | MyIPaddress - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0 |
    0 | 16 | 0 |
    | MyIPaddress - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0 |
    0 | 16 | 0 |
    |tlh-flrcore-7609-1-gi13-v1927-1.net.flrnet.org - 0 | 118 | 118
    | 0 | 2 | 62 | 0 |
    |tpa-flrcore-7609-1-te23-1.net.flrnet.org - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0
    | 20 | 78 | 47 |
    |mia-flrcore-7609-1-gi12-1.net.flrnet.org - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0
    | 28 | 218 | 78 |
    | nota.bas2.dce.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0
    | 16 | 78 | 16 |
    | so-1-1-0.pat1.dce.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 31
    | 45 | 141 | 31 |
    | ae2-p150.msr2.re1.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 31
    | 46 | 141 | 31 |
    | te-8-1.bas-a1.re1.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 31
    | 43 | 63 | 32 |
    | f1.www.vip.re1.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 31
    | 42 | 62 | 31 |
    |________________________________________________|______|______|______|
    ______|______|______|

    I have replaced my IP address with "MyIPaddress". Hope it will not
    matter in analyzing the problem.
    g_1, Oct 29, 2009
    #7
  8. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    On Oct 29, 7:55 am, Desk Rabbit <> wrote:

    > Your bandwidth could be throttled by the switches or something further
    > up the chain. Either way it will be controlled by the IT department and
    > there will be very little you can do about it. If it is having a
    > detrimental effect on your productivity then I'd suggest getting your
    > head of department to talk to the head of the IT department and get it
    > sorted out.

    Bandwidth should not be throttled as it is not some
    ISP who is trying to limit the speed of its users.
    The head of IT department does not have time for our office and for
    such matters. So, it is
    upto me to analyze as much as I can and then go to the IT
    department pointing that we are suffering due to so and so reasons.

    > On the other hand, if you are just a bunch of whinging moaners who don't
    > need the bandwidth to do your job and keep complaining to the IT
    > department, you might find that it gets slower and slower. Try taking
    > chocolate biscuits to the IT team and making friends with them.


    No, we are not moaners nor did we alienate the IT team
    , but a speed of 269kbps is not something
    to be proud of when other offices in campus have 22Mbps speed
    g_1, Oct 29, 2009
    #8
  9. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    On Oct 29, 12:13 pm, why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote:

    > >Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    > >269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of

    >
    > You got this figure how?
    > [0.269Mbps]

    Through internet bandwidth speed tests like speedmatters.org and
    speakeasy.net(while
    using this I chose the nearest server from my location for the
    test).

    > Of course you don't say how far away from you the 'download server' is.

    Well, if I can download a file on other offices in campus in 2 mins
    which takes
    some 25mins in our office for the same file from the server, I guess
    it
    does not matter much how far we are from the
    'download server' as the problem is not with the download server
    distance, but
    our network.
    > >22000kbps(I know it is high, but the college has some gigabit network

    >
    > [22Mbps]
    >
    > [Gigabit 1000000kbps, 1000Mbps, 1Gbps]
    >
    > So the 22 is way lower.

    Well, when I run the above mentioned internet bandwidth speeds on
    other
    offices of campus which have 'proper network' that is what I get
    22Mbs

    > >which provides such high speed). We are connected through a backbone
    > >(which has a speed of 21000kbps) and have a Fiber Ethernet Adapter in

    >
    > That backbone is 1000kbps slower then above :) doesn't sound right.

    My mistake. The backbone is at the same speed as the main
    campus server. So, it is also gigabit network.

    Another point I left out was the upload speed shown by
    the bandwidth tests shows 6000kbps. Now, the medium is same
    for uploading and downloading which is the same fiber optic
    meaning if lot of packets can be uploaded(or upload speed is high)
    why can't a lot of packets be downloaded quickly or why
    is our download speed so low?

    > >our machines. I don't know much on how to trace the reason for slow

    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traceroutehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ping


    I tried running WinMtr http://sourceforge.net/projects/winmtr/ to
    www.yahoo.com
    and below are the results

    |------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    | WinMTR
    statistics |
    | Host - % | Sent | Recv | Best
    | Avrg | Wrst | Last |
    |------------------------------------------------|------|------|------|------|------|------|
    | MyIPaddress - 0 | 119 | 119 | 0 |
    0 | 16 | 0 |
    | CollegeIPSubnet - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0
    | 0 | 16 | 0 |
    | MyIPaddress - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0 |
    0 | 16 | 0 |
    | MyIPaddress - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0 |
    0 | 16 | 0 |
    |tlh-flrcore-7609-1-gi13-v1927-1.net.flrnet.org - 0 | 118 | 118
    | 0 | 2 | 62 | 0 |
    |tpa-flrcore-7609-1-te23-1.net.flrnet.org - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0
    | 20 | 78 | 47 |
    |mia-flrcore-7609-1-gi12-1.net.flrnet.org - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0
    | 28 | 218 | 78 |
    | nota.bas2.dce.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0
    | 16 | 78 | 16 |
    | so-1-1-0.pat1.dce.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 31
    | 45 | 141 | 31 |
    | ae2-p150.msr2.re1.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 31
    | 46 | 141 | 31 |
    | te-8-1.bas-a1.re1.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 31
    | 43 | 63 | 32 |
    | f1.www.vip.re1.yahoo.com - 0 | 118 | 118 | 31
    | 42 | 62 | 31 |
    |________________________________________________|______|______|______|
    ______|______|______|

    I replaced the IP address with the text "MyIPaddress". Hope it won't
    matter
    for analysis purposes.

    > >speed. We have a IT support department in our college, but they are
    > >least worried about our slow speed. We have told them 7 times in past

    >
    > >2 months, but no response from them.

    >
    > Only they can really check this out.


    Yes, but they need to be told that the fault
    is not ours and we have done our research.
    Then, only we have a chance of convincing them.


    > >I guess, a Fiber Ethernet Adapter(Allied Telesyn AT-2701FX PCI 100Mb
    > >Fiber Ethernet Adapter) can support speeds lot more than we are
    > >getting.

    >
    > Yes, 100Mbps is 100000kbps
    >
    > Of course the 1000Mbps, 100Mbps are all best performance max values
    > usually not obtainable by 1 download.


    Indeed, but my question is why are we not getting the
    22Mbps speed which other offices on campus are
    getting.

    > >The backbone is something we don't control. So, when I am told it

    >
    > Sounds like a good idea :)


    Yes to some extent. But, bad when you want to trace things like
    now.

    > >provides speed of 21000kbps I have to just believe it. Is there a way
    > >to measure it?

    >
    > 2 PCs in the appropriate place on the link and, well there are lots of
    > speed tests. Generally you have to know how and where things like
    > servers are. This way you can pick points where the traffic has to go
    > over the backbone.


    > >The switches in the office are under lock and key in a shelf where the
    > >key is with the IT department for college.

    >
    > Another good idea, I do this to them as well ;-)


    Yes, but we cannot reboot the network switches.
    Cannot determine if something else is disrupting them.
    More dependency on IT department

    > >The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is
    > >no adware, spyware or unwanted programs which are causing the slow

    >
    > Again how?

    I tested all 10 office machines using the internet bandwidth tests
    speedmatters.org
    and speakeasy.net and got low speeds of 200 something kpbs only.
    I used Ad-Aware, Spybot Search and Destroy, Hijackthis to determine
    if anything weird was running and did not find any. The start up does
    not
    have any strange programs. I checked the registry to see if
    something strange was present, but the programs appeared legitimate.

    > >speed or using the network bandwidth. The machines have no virus. They

    >
    > Again how?

    We use McAfee 8.5 Enterprise Version whose real time scanning
    should keep the machines free from viruses. It also updates its
    definitions daily.

    > >run a virus scanner whose definitions are updated daily. They run
    > >Windows XP, have a speed of 2.79GHz and 1GB of RAM.

    >
    > >Question is, could the switches be the cause of slow speed? How can I

    >
    > Perhaps, but less likely since it's fiber, but even then there may be
    > mismatches on link settings at either end (NIC adapter settings).


    How do I determine this?

    > >verify they are the cause and not something else? Can I run some tests
    > >for that without having physical access to it?

    >
    > If you have 2 PCs in the same room you can time a file transfer between
    > them. Then PCs in different rooms. perhaps that would be across 2
    > switches over a short bit of the backbone.


    > >Can someone please clarify?

    >
    > Not really, you left out a lot of info.

    What more do I need to provide?


    > There could be QoS throttling?http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_of_service


    Unlikely, why would we be throttled, when other offices on
    campus are not?

    > could be bandwidth maxed out

    With the speed we are getting?

    >, routing , faulty bit of fiber, failing
    > laser in an uplink adapter.

    How do I determine this?

    > Me

    Thanks a lot for your help and time.
    g_1, Oct 29, 2009
    #9
  10. g_1

    g_1 Guest


    > If you have 2 PCs in the same room you can time a file transfer between
    > them. Then PCs in different rooms. perhaps that would be across 2
    > switches over a short bit of the backbone.


    Don't have two PC's in the same room at present. But, a file transfer
    between
    two PC's in different rooms took some 20mins for a 55MB file.

    Thanks.
    g_1, Oct 30, 2009
    #10
  11. g_1

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    g_1 wrote:
    > On Oct 29, 7:55 am, Desk Rabbit <> wrote:
    >
    >> Your bandwidth could be throttled by the switches or something further
    >> up the chain. Either way it will be controlled by the IT department and
    >> there will be very little you can do about it. If it is having a
    >> detrimental effect on your productivity then I'd suggest getting your
    >> head of department to talk to the head of the IT department and get it
    >> sorted out.

    > Bandwidth should not be throttled as it is not some
    > ISP who is trying to limit the speed of its users.


    Why ever not? There is a finite amount of bandwidth even on a high speed
    network. It makes absolute sense to apportion it so that those that need
    it for critical work get it.

    > The head of IT department does not have time for our office and for
    > such matters. So, it is


    Sounds like you are well down the pecking list for bandwidth.

    > upto me to analyze as much as I can and then go to the IT
    > department pointing that we are suffering due to so and so reasons.


    What does your head of department have to say about you spending your
    time doing the work of the IT department?

    >
    >> On the other hand, if you are just a bunch of whinging moaners who don't
    >> need the bandwidth to do your job and keep complaining to the IT
    >> department, you might find that it gets slower and slower. Try taking
    >> chocolate biscuits to the IT team and making friends with them.

    >
    > No, we are not moaners nor did we alienate the IT team
    > , but a speed of 269kbps is not something
    > to be proud of when other offices in campus have 22Mbps speed


    This is sounding less and less like a technical issue.
    Desk Rabbit, Oct 30, 2009
    #11
  12. g_1

    why? Guest

    On Thu, 29 Oct 2009 10:18:11 -0700, Evan Platt wrote:

    >On Thu, 29 Oct 2009 17:13:57 GMT, why?
    ><fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote:
    >
    >>Not really, you left out a lot of info.

    >
    >References:
    ><>
    >
    >Serious?
    >
    >IT using GG?


    I will admit to using Google to search :) solves lots of Windows update
    issues.

    >If I owned a company, and found out my IT manager used GG, he / she'd
    >be canned..


    Especially since it's not a remote resolution issue. Although too much
    wasn't given away.

    Me
    why?, Oct 30, 2009
    #12
  13. g_1

    why? Guest

    On Thu, 29 Oct 2009 15:46:52 -0700 (PDT), g_1 wrote:

    >On Oct 29, 1:23 am, No Spam <> wrote:
    >> In article
    >> <>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> g_1 <> wrote:
    >> >On Oct 28, 10:06 pm, g_1 <> wrote:
    >> >> On Oct 28, 10:04 pm, g_1 <> wrote:

    >>
    >> >> > Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    >> >> > 269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of

    <snip>

    >> On Windows, here is a port of mtr.
    >>
    >> http://winmtr.sourceforge.net0
    >>

    >Thanks, this is what a traceroute to Yahoo.com shows


    Sometimes it really good to play nice and reformat tables to make it
    easier to read.

    >|------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    >| WinMTR
    >statistics |
    >| Host - % | Sent | Recv | Best
    >| Avrg | Wrst | Last |
    >|------------------------------------------------|------|------|------|------|------|------|
    >| MyIPaddress - 0 | 119 | 119 | 0 |
    >0 | 16 | 0 |
    >| CollegeIPSubnet - 0 | 118 | 118 | 0
    >| 0 | 16 | 0 |

    <snip>

    Me
    why?, Oct 30, 2009
    #13
  14. g_1

    why? Guest

    On Thu, 29 Oct 2009 15:51:30 -0700 (PDT), g_1 wrote:

    >On Oct 29, 7:55 am, Desk Rabbit <> wrote:
    >
    >> Your bandwidth could be throttled by the switches or something further
    >> up the chain. Either way it will be controlled by the IT department and
    >> there will be very little you can do about it. If it is having a
    >> detrimental effect on your productivity then I'd suggest getting your
    >> head of department to talk to the head of the IT department and get it
    >> sorted out.

    >Bandwidth should not be throttled as it is not some
    >ISP who is trying to limit the speed of its users.


    Except for anything the college is paying for externally or renting, or
    limiting the max everyone has for a narrower pipe upstream.

    >The head of IT department does not have time for our office and for
    >such matters. So, it is
    >upto me to analyze as much as I can and then go to the IT
    >department pointing that we are suffering due to so and so reasons.


    Then go above IT and report it.

    >> On the other hand, if you are just a bunch of whinging moaners who don't
    >> need the bandwidth to do your job and keep complaining to the IT
    >> department, you might find that it gets slower and slower. Try taking
    >> chocolate biscuits to the IT team and making friends with them.

    >
    >No, we are not moaners nor did we alienate the IT team


    So how do you not alienate the IT team? Out lot are experts at it...

    The last idiot guessed an IP address, it was detected and logged by
    Windows Event viewer. No we don't scan the event logs, they used the IP
    address of my LAN monitoring PC.

    <snip>

    Me
    why?, Oct 30, 2009
    #14
  15. g_1

    why? Guest

    On Thu, 29 Oct 2009 16:28:02 -0700 (PDT), g_1 wrote:

    >On Oct 29, 12:13 pm, why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote:
    >
    >> >Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    >> >269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of

    >>
    >> You got this figure how?
    >> [0.269Mbps]

    >Through internet bandwidth speed tests like speedmatters.org and
    >speakeasy.net(while
    >using this I chose the nearest server from my location for the
    >test).
    >

    <large snip>
    >
    >> >The switches in the office are under lock and key in a shelf where the
    >> >key is with the IT department for college.

    >>
    >> Another good idea, I do this to them as well ;-)

    >
    >Yes, but we cannot reboot the network switches.


    Didn't suggest trying it? :)

    >Cannot determine if something else is disrupting them.
    >More dependency on IT department


    That's what they are there for.

    >> >The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is


    We have a situation like that. 6 PCs upgraded to Win XP 64bit. Some apps
    64bit, some not. Users report thier primary app still 32bit is 5x slower
    after the OS upgrade. So they reason it's a network fault.

    >> >no adware, spyware or unwanted programs which are causing the slow

    >>
    >> Again how?

    >I tested all 10 office machines using the internet bandwidth tests
    >speedmatters.org


    So that all goes externally, you need to perfom a similar test
    internally to see if it's inside the LAN. Hence the PC/PC same room,
    different room and perhaps 2 rooms reasonably far apart. Of course you
    have to know the LAN layout to know what links / devices are in between.

    >and speakeasy.net and got low speeds of 200 something kpbs only.


    Somebody missed a few 000 on the configuration for your bandwidth
    allocation.

    <snip>

    >> Perhaps, but less likely since it's fiber, but even then there may be
    >> mismatches on link settings at either end (NIC adapter settings).

    >
    >How do I determine this?


    Your end of the settings for the NIC, well you know how to get to those
    in XP configuration settings. The IT dept should confirm what they
    should be.

    >> >verify they are the cause and not something else? Can I run some tests
    >> >for that without having physical access to it?

    >>

    <snip>
    >
    >>, routing , faulty bit of fiber, failing
    >> laser in an uplink adapter.


    Use a new / different adapter?

    Unplug all PCs and run tests with only 1 connected at a time, again
    looking at faulty adapters / upstream links. Something locally could be
    cauing a problems on the upstream switch.

    >How do I determine this?


    Move a slow PC to another office rerun test. Ditto move fast PC where
    slow PC is. Of course you have to move systems by what ever official
    process you have.

    If slow PC is faster, then it's NIC is okay and new fiber is okay.
    If fast PC is slower, you know it's NIC was okay, so it's slow on that 1
    link.

    Of course it soulds like the (knowing the LAN layout) it's the chunk of
    the infrastructure you are on.


    >> Me

    >Thanks a lot for your help and time.


    Me
    why?, Oct 30, 2009
    #15
  16. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    On Oct 30, 5:28 am, Desk Rabbit <> wrote:
    > > Bandwidth should not be throttled as it is not some
    > > ISP who is trying to limit the speed of its users.

    >
    > Why ever not? There is a finite amount of bandwidth even on a high speed
    > network. It makes absolute sense to apportion it so that those that need
    > it for critical work get it.


    Well, other offices on campus can get 22Mbps why can't we get atleast
    7Mbps?
    So, throttling is not the case with us.

    > > upto me to analyze as much as I can and then go to the IT
    > > department pointing that we are suffering due to so and so reasons.

    >
    > What does your head of department have to say about you spending your
    > time doing the work of the IT department?


    They want me to fix the office network. How I do it is not they are
    worried.
    They want results(fast office network)
    >
    >
    > >> On the other hand, if you are just a bunch of whinging moaners who don't
    > >> need the bandwidth to do your job and keep complaining to the IT
    > >> department, you might find that it gets slower and slower. Try taking
    > >> chocolate biscuits to the IT team and making friends with them.

    >
    > > No, we are not moaners nor did we alienate the IT team
    > > , but a speed of 269kbps is not something
    > > to be proud of when other offices in campus have 22Mbps speed

    >
    > This is sounding less and less like a technical issue.


    What does it sound like? If your machine is running slow despite its
    powerful configuration what would you think it is? Similarly, though
    other offices can get speeds of 22Mbps whereas we cannot having the
    proper NIC card what could it be?
    g_1, Oct 30, 2009
    #16
  17. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    On Oct 30, 10:21 am, why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote:
    > On Thu, 29 Oct 2009 15:46:52 -0700 (PDT), g_1 wrote:
    > >On Oct 29, 1:23 am, No Spam <> wrote:
    > >> In article
    > >> <>

    >
    > >> g_1 <> wrote:
    > >> >On Oct 28, 10:06 pm, g_1 <> wrote:
    > >> >> On Oct 28, 10:04 pm, g_1 <> wrote:

    >
    > >> >> > Our office has a very slow network with the download speed about
    > >> >> > 269kbps. We are part of a college where other offices have speed of

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > >> On Windows, here is a port of mtr.

    >
    > >>http://winmtr.sourceforge.net0

    >
    > >Thanks, this is what a traceroute to Yahoo.com shows

    >
    > Sometimes it really good to play nice and reformat tables to make it
    > easier to read.


    Yes, Google groups did not format it. I should have known.

    Thanks for pointing it out. I will be careful in future.
    >
    > >|------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    > >|                                      WinMTR
    > >statistics                                   |
    > >|                       Host              -   %  | Sent | Recv | Best
    > >| Avrg | Wrst | Last |
    > >|------------------------------------------------|------|------|------|------|------|------|
    > >|                         MyIPaddress -    0 |  119 |  119 |    0 |
    > >0 |   16 |    0 |
    > >|                         CollegeIPSubnet -    0 |  118 |  118 |    0
    > >|    0 |   16 |    0 |

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > Me
    g_1, Oct 30, 2009
    #17
  18. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    On Oct 30, 10:29 am, why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote:
    > >> Your bandwidth could be throttled by the switches or something further
    > >> up the chain. Either way it will be controlled by the IT department and
    > >> there will be very little you can do about it. If it is having a
    > >> detrimental effect on your productivity then I'd suggest getting your
    > >> head of department to talk to the head of the IT department and get it
    > >> sorted out.

    > >Bandwidth should not be throttled as it is not some
    > >ISP who is trying to limit the speed of its users.

    >
    > Except for anything the college is paying for externally or renting, or
    > limiting the max everyone has for a narrower pipe upstream.

    Well, I meant if other offices on campus have speeds of 22Mbps, our
    speed
    cannot be throttled to 200 something kpbs

    > >The head of IT department does not have time for our office and for
    > >such matters. So, it is
    > >upto me to analyze as much as I can and then go to the IT
    > >department pointing that we are suffering due to so and so reasons.

    >
    > Then go above IT and report it.

    I do not have the authority to do it.

    > >> On the other hand, if you are just a bunch of whinging moaners who don't
    > >> need the bandwidth to do your job and keep complaining to the IT
    > >> department, you might find that it gets slower and slower. Try taking
    > >> chocolate biscuits to the IT team and making friends with them.

    >
    > >No, we are not moaners nor did we alienate the IT team

    >
    > So how do you not alienate the IT team? Out lot are experts at it...


    Well, I started recently and did not hear that our department
    had alienated the IT department before I came.

    > The last idiot guessed an IP address, it was detected and logged by
    > Windows Event viewer. No we don't scan the event logs, they used the IP
    > address of my LAN monitoring PC.
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > Me
    g_1, Oct 30, 2009
    #18
  19. g_1

    why? Guest

    On Fri, 30 Oct 2009 12:17:02 -0700 (PDT), g_1 wrote:

    >On Oct 30, 10:29 am, why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote:
    >> >> Your bandwidth could be throttled by the switches or something further
    >> >> up the chain. Either way it will be controlled by the IT department and
    >> >> there will be very little you can do about it. If it is having a
    >> >> detrimental effect on your productivity then I'd suggest getting your
    >> >> head of department to talk to the head of the IT department and get it
    >> >> sorted out.
    >> >Bandwidth should not be throttled as it is not some
    >> >ISP who is trying to limit the speed of its users.

    >>
    >> Except for anything the college is paying for externally or renting, or
    >> limiting the max everyone has for a narrower pipe upstream.

    >Well, I meant if other offices on campus have speeds of 22Mbps, our
    >speed
    >cannot be throttled to 200 something kpbs
    >
    >> >The head of IT department does not have time for our office and for
    >> >such matters. So, it is
    >> >upto me to analyze as much as I can and then go to the IT
    >> >department pointing that we are suffering due to so and so reasons.

    >>
    >> Then go above IT and report it.

    >I do not have the authority to do it.


    Someone has to do it.

    Despite what I say to my users, it is the IT dept job to fix issues like
    this. Then again I have something like 100 MRTG graphs collecting data,
    2 years of ping tables, kit on site and all over our WAN. The WAN is
    also monitored at a traffic, response & application level.

    If I don't do something, the customer reports it to thier manager, thier
    IT management, then my service manager, my line manager then me. It
    should be the same for anybody.

    <large snip>

    We have hand only 2 LAN faults in the past year or so, failed PSU in a
    switch and dodgy laser (ocassional loss of links to switch stack) in a
    GBIC transceiver and 1 capacity issue the WAN was upgraded from 31 to 51
    Mbps. Generally I prove it's NOT a LAN issue Ha Ha.


    Me
    why?, Oct 30, 2009
    #19
  20. g_1

    g_1 Guest

    On Oct 30, 10:51 am, why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote:

    > >> >The slow speed is occurring on all 10 machines in an office. There is

    >
    > We have a situation like that. 6 PCs upgraded to Win XP 64bit. Some apps
    > 64bit, some not. Users report thier primary app still 32bit is 5x slower
    > after the OS upgrade. So they reason it's a network fault.
    >


    > So that all goes externally, you need to perfom a similar test
    > internally to see if it's inside the LAN. Hence the PC/PC same room,
    > different room and perhaps 2 rooms reasonably far apart. Of course you
    > have to know the LAN layout to know what links / devices are in between.


    How do I determine the LAN layout and links/device in between. Can
    tools like
    MS network monitor help?

    > >> Perhaps, but less likely since it's fiber, but even then there may be
    > >> mismatches on link settings at either end (NIC adapter settings).

    >
    > >How do I determine this?

    >
    > Your end of the settings for the NIC, well you know how to get to those
    > in XP configuration settings. The IT dept should confirm what they
    > should be.

    They look proper to me.

    > Use a new / different adapter?

    How much would that cost? And, what type of adapter do
    we need?

    > Unplug all PCs and run tests with only 1 connected at a time, again
    > looking at faulty adapters / upstream links. Something locally could be
    > cauing a problems on the upstream switch.

    Did that and still slow speed. At night 9pm, I can reach a speed of
    700 something kpbs
    but not more than that.

    > >How do I determine this?

    >
    > Move a slow PC to another office rerun test. Ditto move fast PC where
    > slow PC is. Of course you have to move systems by what ever official
    > process you have.


    > If slow PC is faster, then it's NIC is okay and new fiber is okay.
    > If fast PC is slower, you know it's NIC was okay, so it's slow on that 1
    > link.

    This, I did not understand. All PC's in our office have slow speed
    so how can moving them help? I cannot move PC's outside the
    office to other departments where the speed is high.

    I looked at the switch and see some amber lights flashing whereas the
    other lights are steady green which means some packet collision is
    occurring on those ports. Now, I need to identify to which machines
    those ports correspond to after all people leave the office. But, I
    thought that should affect only those two machines and not all
    machines. Or, do such collisions hamper the whole network?

    Also, the upload speed from the bandwidth tests speedmatters.org comes
    to be 7Mbps, but the download is a meagre 200-300kpbs. Now, how come
    upload speed is so high compared to download as the medium for sending/
    receiving is the same?

    I also got a suggestion from one staff who thinks because we have low
    RAM we have low network speed. Excluding two, all machines have 1GB
    RAM and are running Windows XP. MS outlook is running all the time
    when the machines are on, alongwith Mcafee virus scanner, but can 1GB
    RAM be a reason for slow network speed. I had speeds of 10Mbps on 512M
    RAM on a Win 2k machine. To investigate further, I chose a machine
    which had XP and 1GB RAM. I started it and ensured no additional
    programs(outlook, word) were running and conducted bandwidth tests
    which show speed of 200kbps. When I tried them at 9 in the night they
    go upto 600-700kpbs, but still I think it is low when other offices on
    campus have lot more than that during the day.

    The two machines which have 2GB RAM have Vista which consumes more
    resources so I did not think RAM could be a reason for the slow speed.

    Could low RAM be a reason for the slow bandwidth for a case like
    ours?

    > Of course it soulds like the (knowing the LAN layout) it's the chunk of
    > the infrastructure you are on.
    >


    How do you determine the LAN layout of your office? Is there some
    app I can use for that?
    >
    > Me


    Thanks a lot for your help and time.
    g_1, Oct 30, 2009
    #20
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