Desktop Linux? Who cares?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Corrie, Oct 23, 2005.

  1. Corrie

    Corrie Guest

    HP has "HP Reccomends Windows XP" on every page including the ones that
    offer Linux as an alternative OS.

    IBM has the same thing.

    HP offers Mandrake 9.2 Linux which is a very old version.

    OpenOffice 2.0 install is easy for Windows users but a mess for Linux
    users.

    Hardware gets released every single day and assuming it is for an
    Intel/AMD system, includes Windows drivers right inside the box.

    Linux?
    Better hope the hardware manufacturer has pity on Linux users or that some
    pimple faced geek decides to reverse engineer a driver.

    We have been hearing for years that this year "insert year here" is the
    year of desktop Linux and still it hasn't happened.

    Microsoft has screwed up left and right with one security problem after
    another but yet it is still #1 and Linux isn't even on the radar screen
    despite Linux being free.

    So why?

    Answer: Linux sucks for a desktop system for anyone other than a
    vi/emacs/LaTex worshipping geek.

    It's obvious.
    A free product that has no market share?
    Conclusion: it sucks.
     
    Corrie, Oct 23, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Corrie <> writes:

    > HP has "HP Reccomends Windows XP" on every page including the ones that
    > offer Linux as an alternative OS.
    >
    > IBM has the same thing.
    >
    > HP offers Mandrake 9.2 Linux which is a very old version.
    >
    > OpenOffice 2.0 install is easy for Windows users but a mess for Linux
    > users.
    >
    > Hardware gets released every single day and assuming it is for an
    > Intel/AMD system, includes Windows drivers right inside the box.
    >
    > Linux?
    > Better hope the hardware manufacturer has pity on Linux users or that some
    > pimple faced geek decides to reverse engineer a driver.
    >
    > We have been hearing for years that this year "insert year here" is the
    > year of desktop Linux and still it hasn't happened.
    >
    > Microsoft has screwed up left and right with one security problem after
    > another but yet it is still #1 and Linux isn't even on the radar screen
    > despite Linux being free.
    >
    > So why?
    >
    > Answer: Linux sucks for a desktop system for anyone other than a
    > vi/emacs/LaTex worshipping geek.
    >
    > It's obvious.
    > A free product that has no market share?
    > Conclusion: it sucks.
    >


    One of these days, Flatty's gonna run out of names.
     
    George Ellison, Oct 23, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. George Ellison wrote:

    > Corrie <> writes:
    >
    >> HP has "HP Reccomends Windows XP" on every page including the ones that
    >> offer Linux as an alternative OS.
    >>
    >> IBM has the same thing.
    >>
    >> HP offers Mandrake 9.2 Linux which is a very old version.
    >>
    >> OpenOffice 2.0 install is easy for Windows users but a mess for Linux
    >> users.
    >>
    >> Hardware gets released every single day and assuming it is for an
    >> Intel/AMD system, includes Windows drivers right inside the box.
    >>
    >> Linux?
    >> Better hope the hardware manufacturer has pity on Linux users or that
    >> some pimple faced geek decides to reverse engineer a driver.
    >>
    >> We have been hearing for years that this year "insert year here" is the
    >> year of desktop Linux and still it hasn't happened.
    >>
    >> Microsoft has screwed up left and right with one security problem after
    >> another but yet it is still #1 and Linux isn't even on the radar screen
    >> despite Linux being free.
    >>
    >> So why?
    >>
    >> Answer: Linux sucks for a desktop system for anyone other than a
    >> vi/emacs/LaTex worshipping geek.
    >>
    >> It's obvious.
    >> A free product that has no market share?
    >> Conclusion: it sucks.
    >>

    >
    > One of these days, Flatty's gonna run out of names.


    I'd like to <plonk> him...but I can't do that twice.

    --
    Tom Wootten, Trinity Hall.
    oof.trinhall.cam.ac.uk
    There was only ever one valid use for the notorious <blink> tag:
    Schrodinger's cat is <blink>not</blink> dead.
     
    Thomas Wootten, Oct 23, 2005
    #3
  4. Today Corrie spoke these views with conviction for everyone's
    edification:

    > Hardware gets released every single day and assuming it is
    > for an Intel/AMD system, includes Windows drivers right
    > inside the box.
    >
    > Linux?
    > Better hope the hardware manufacturer has pity on Linux
    > users or that some pimple faced geek decides to reverse
    > engineer a driver.
    >
    > We have been hearing for years that this year "insert year
    > here" is the year of desktop Linux and still it hasn't
    > happened.


    I follow the trends somewhat, as my computer guru nephew is in
    love with Linux as well as all versions of Windoze. But, even
    though he knows what he's doing and has all the "open" apps,
    he still says that Linux is a ways off on the desktop. He
    cites lack of drivers for new hardware as well as some lack of
    drivers for older, legacy HW, such as scanners and printers.

    > Microsoft has screwed up left and right with one security
    > problem after another but yet it is still #1 and Linux
    > isn't even on the radar screen despite Linux being free.


    Well, Linux /is/ making headway, including - so I've heard -
    DOD, who allegedly went/is going to it because so few nasti-
    ware is evident. My cynical take on Linux's lack of credible
    threats has a lot more to do with so many people who hate Bill
    the Gates and take delight in finding new holes to exploit
    after the daily "critical updates"/"security patches" we're
    all familiar with, than any inherent ability to resist
    attacks.

    > So why?
    >
    > Answer: Linux sucks for a desktop system for anyone other
    > than a vi/emacs/LaTex worshipping geek.
    >
    > It's obvious.
    > A free product that has no market share?
    > Conclusion: it sucks.


    Agreed, but as the advertising industry used to say "nobody
    gets it until everybody wants it", meaning that Linux is in an
    infinite loop/circular proof where no one will write
    commercial apps or drivers for it until it is a viable O/S,
    yet it will never become viable without apps and drivers...

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry
     
    All Things Mopar, Oct 23, 2005
    #4
  5. Corrie

    Rick Guest

    On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 20:22:20 -0400, Corrie wrote:

    (snip)...

    ... a really lousy troll attempt.

    --
    Rick
     
    Rick, Oct 23, 2005
    #5
  6. Corrie

    flatfish Guest

    On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 21:33:16 -0400, flatfish wrote:

    > On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 01:30:11 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    >
    >> Corrie blithely blithered
    >>> HP has "HP Reccomends Windows XP" on every page including the ones that
    >>> offer Linux as an alternative OS.

    >
    >>> OpenOffice 2.0 install is easy for Windows users but a mess for Linux
    >>> users.

    >>
    >> eh?
    >>
    >> ~# for a in *rpm; do rpm2tgz $a; done; rm *.rpm; installpkg *tgz
    >>
    >> Do that with a wizard.

    >
    > Thanks for the laugh!!!!!
    >
    > www.openoffice.org--->click on download--->click on setup.exe...
    > done.....
    >
    > You must be kidding?



    Oh I forgot to mention that this is a key reason why Linux is going
    nowhere on the desktop.

    That command you pulled from your inner bowels, how is Joe supposed to
    know that?

    You boobs in COLA are so far out of touch with the real world you might as
    well be living on Mars.
     
    flatfish, Oct 23, 2005
    #6
  7. Corrie

    Skeets Guest

    Re: Desktop Linux? Who cares?

    >>I follow the trends somewhat, as my computer guru nephew is in
    love with Linux as well as all versions of Windoze. But, even
    though he knows what he's doing and has all the "open" apps,
    he still says that Linux is a ways off on the desktop. He
    cites lack of drivers for new hardware as well as some lack of
    drivers for older, legacy HW, such as scanners and printers.<<

    as someone going through the first steps of setting up a linux box, it
    does appear that linux installs take some forethought, as opposed to
    blindly buying an old combination of hardware.

    i'd suggest that MS only shops buy win / linux capable HW starting NOW
    so that they have options. options is what keeps you from bending over
    and saying thank you after being assaulted. you *can* fight back.
    unfortunately, not many folks value IT (thanks to MS???) to see it as
    something critical to the underlying business. they need education. i
    do my best.

    >>Well, Linux /is/ making headway, including - so I've heard -

    DOD, who allegedly went/is going to it because so few nasti-
    ware is evident. My cynical take on Linux's lack of credible
    threats has a lot more to do with so many people who hate Bill
    the Gates and take delight in finding new holes to exploit
    after the daily "critical updates"/"security patches" we're
    all familiar with, than any inherent ability to resist
    attacks.<<

    this is partially true... but can you imagine the *fame* of shutting
    down linux worldwide? such a person would GRAND PUHBAH HACKMEISTER for
    a long time and be written in the logs of history. some crackpot is
    out there trying it... they have to be.

    from what i understand, the turn off for linux virus' is that they
    don't spread easily in the wild due to proper security implementation.
    sure, you can screw over a single computer... but how do you then take
    over that computer and multiply your efforts?

    that is only easy on microsoft... no hacker wants to waste time
    thrashing one machine unless it is personal, of course. but they will
    put the effort in if it can shut down hundreds of thousands of
    computers and pile egg on bill gates' face.

    >>Agreed, but as the advertising industry used to say "nobody

    gets it until everybody wants it", meaning that Linux is in an
    infinite loop/circular proof where no one will write
    commercial apps or drivers for it until it is a viable O/S,
    yet it will never become viable without apps and drivers...<<

    i think you are usa-centric. i don't see the usa will lead the charge
    on linux - we are too fat and happy at the driver's wheel. however,
    when brazil, germany, china, korea, etc have tens of millions, moving
    toward hundreds of millions, of fertile linux desktops waiting for
    applications and drivers...

    they will be created... and microsoft will be spending billions to
    manipulate smaller and smaller territory.

    i do expect the usa will be ahold out in this revolution for some
    time... then again, given the fact the federal government is bankrupt,
    the states are bankrupt and the cities are almost all bankrupt... at
    some point someone will bring up the cost issue... even if it is as
    they tied to a stake as the general public lights the fire.
     
    Skeets, Oct 23, 2005
    #7
  8. Corrie

    ray Guest


    > Answer: Linux sucks for a desktop system for anyone other than a
    > vi/emacs/LaTex worshipping geek.
    >
    > It's obvious.
    > A free product that has no market share?
    > Conclusion: it sucks.


    I don't agree with your assertions or your conclusion, and you have
    several facts wrong - other than that, a great post!.

    I've installed Mandrake 10.1 on the public access internet computers at
    the local library and the patrons are having no difficulty adapting to it.
    A customer satisfaction survey conducted after six months of use found NO
    complaints.

    Most computer experts concede that Linux passed MAC for total number of
    desktop installs sometime in 2004 - estimates of the market share run,
    generally, between 7 and 10 percent.
     
    ray, Oct 23, 2005
    #8
  9. All Things Mopar wrote:

    > Today Corrie spoke these views with conviction for everyone's
    > edification:
    >
    >> Hardware gets released every single day and assuming it is
    >> for an Intel/AMD system, includes Windows drivers right
    >> inside the box.
    >>
    >> Linux?
    >> Better hope the hardware manufacturer has pity on Linux
    >> users or that some pimple faced geek decides to reverse
    >> engineer a driver.
    >>
    >> We have been hearing for years that this year "insert year
    >> here" is the year of desktop Linux and still it hasn't
    >> happened.

    >
    > I follow the trends somewhat, as my computer guru nephew is in
    > love with Linux as well as all versions of Windoze. But, even
    > though he knows what he's doing and has all the "open" apps,
    > he still says that Linux is a ways off on the desktop. He
    > cites lack of drivers for new hardware as well as some lack of
    > drivers for older, legacy HW, such as scanners and printers.
    >
    >> Microsoft has screwed up left and right with one security
    >> problem after another but yet it is still #1 and Linux isn't
    >> even on the radar screen despite Linux being free.

    >
    > Well, Linux /is/ making headway, including - so I've heard -


    YHBT. Feed less; bin more.

    --
    Blinky
    Killing all Google Groups posts.
    http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
     
    Blinky the Shark, Oct 23, 2005
    #9
  10. Corrie

    mose Guest

    "ray" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    >
    >> Answer: Linux sucks for a desktop system for anyone other than a
    >> vi/emacs/LaTex worshipping geek.
    >>
    >> It's obvious.
    >> A free product that has no market share?
    >> Conclusion: it sucks.

    >
    > I don't agree with your assertions or your conclusion, and you have
    > several facts wrong - other than that, a great post!.
    >
    > I've installed Mandrake 10.1 on the public access internet computers at
    > the local library and the patrons are having no difficulty adapting to it.
    > A customer satisfaction survey conducted after six months of use found NO
    > complaints.
    >
    > Most computer experts concede that Linux passed MAC for total number of
    > desktop installs sometime in 2004 - estimates of the market share run,
    > generally, between 7 and 10 percent.



    >I've installed Mandrake 10.1 on the public access internet computers at

    the local library and the patrons are having no difficulty adapting to it.
    A customer satisfaction survey conducted after six months of use found NO
    complaints.

    Typical response of welfare pukes, using a service that taxpayers
    are providing. Don't complain about using a service that other's must
    pay for.
     
    mose, Oct 23, 2005
    #10
  11. Corrie

    peterwn Guest

    Re: Desktop Linux? Who cares?

    "HP has "HP Reccomends Windows XP" on every page including the ones
    that
    offer Linux as an alternative OS.

    IBM has the same thing."

    Yes, they get a nice little bit of payola from Bill for stating this.
    If however they misbehave like pushing Linux too hard on consumer
    computers or selling 'bare bones' consumer machines, that nice little
    payola may just dry up.

    Moreover the IRS, ATO, Commissioners of the Inland Revenue and other
    tax offices around the world may be interested in the transfer pricing
    tax implications of this payola.
     
    peterwn, Oct 23, 2005
    #11
  12. Corrie

    Seatoller Guest

    On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 21:15:48 -0700, mose wrote:

    >
    >> "ray" <> wrote in message
    >> news:p...


    >>I've installed Mandrake 10.1 on the public access internet computers at
    >> the local library and the patrons are having no difficulty adapting to
    >> it.
    >> A customer satisfaction survey conducted after six months of use found
    >> NO complaints.

    >
    > Typical response of welfare pukes, using a service that taxpayers are
    > providing. Don't complain about using a service that other's must pay
    > for.


    Who's complaining? Read it again.
     
    Seatoller, Oct 23, 2005
    #12
  13. Corrie

    Mitch Guest

    In article <djel3k$kau$>, Corrie
    <> wrote:


    > Microsoft has screwed up left and right with one security problem after
    > another but yet it is still #1 and Linux isn't even on the radar screen
    > despite Linux being free.


    > It's obvious.
    > A free product that has no market share?
    > Conclusion: it sucks.
    >


    That's the worst, most obvious error you could possibly make.

    Market share is NOT determined by a product being good or others being
    bad. Windows has NEVER been at the top of the lot in quality or
    ability. Most Windows users don't believe there are any good options.
    Most Windows users have a hard time even admitting there _might_ be
    another choice.
     
    Mitch, Oct 23, 2005
    #13
  14. Re: Desktop Linux? Who cares?

    Today Skeets spoke these views with conviction for everyone's
    edification:

    [snip]
    > i think you are usa-centric. i don't see the usa will lead
    > the charge on linux - we are too fat and happy at the
    > driver's wheel.


    Yep, I am - and damn proud of it! And, yes, the gooks can out-
    program us easily, if they want to. And for only $1/hour instead
    of $30+...

    BTW, is your shift key broken?

    [snip]

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry
     
    All Things Mopar, Oct 23, 2005
    #14
  15. Corrie

    Guest

    Re: Desktop Linux? Who cares?

    Corrie wrote:
    > HP has "HP Reccomends Windows XP" on every page including the ones that
    > offer Linux as an alternative OS.
    >
    > IBM has the same thing.


    Microsoft has an OEM license agreement, which makes the End User
    License Agreement (EULA) look simple.

    The OEMLA has clauses which cover advertizing, web pages, use of
    trademarks on everything from ads to packaging to the desktop. It
    allows Microsoft final approval authority over the content and
    placement of the trademarks. For example, if Microsoft doesn't want
    Dell computers being advertized as running Microsoft Windows when these
    ads are being placed in Linux today, Microsoft can demand that the ad
    containing Windows logos and trademarks be removed. Today, Dell will
    often place the ad anyway, without the Windows logo.

    Microsoft has also been hauled into court before Judge Kolar-Kotelly
    over this very issue. Microsoft's defense was "We want these OEMS to
    reccomend XP instead of Windows 2000, Windows 98, or Windows 95. This
    was a classic example of a diversionary tactic, telling the judge one
    thing while telling the OEMs something very different. Keep in mind
    that none of the contracts say "you will not advertize Windows and
    Linux on the same web page", but in practice, Microsoft will reject any
    ad which contains both the Windows logo/trademarks and the Linux
    logos/trademarks.

    > HP offers Mandrake 9.2 Linux which is a very old version.




    > OpenOffice 2.0 install is easy for Windows users but a mess for Linux
    > users.


    There isn't an RPM?

    On Windows, the application is responsible for installing all special
    libraries in addition to the application itself. On Linux, the package
    identifies which libraries are needed, and then allows the user to
    either find and load that library, or "force" the installation to use
    the libraries already installed.

    With Windows, you often MUST have the EXACT version of the library
    desired. If you want to run Windows 95 software on Windows XP, you
    might have to install your own VBRun software, because the current
    VBRun may not be compatible with the API's used on 95.

    With RPM, the software publisher has the option of specifying the exact
    version library needed, the top version of the library needed, or the
    earliest version of the library needed.

    The usual culprit has been the C++ libraries, which use name-mangling
    to handle complex hierarchies of classes, methods, and inheritance.
    Until recently, this name mangling could make the same class/methods on
    one version of a library look completely different from another version
    of the same library.

    Linux LSB-3 has directly addressed this issue. It appears that
    Microsoft might want to use this technology, but they don't want to
    have to use Open Source licenses to do so.

    > Hardware gets released every single day and assuming it is for an
    > Intel/AMD system, includes Windows drivers right inside the box.


    Microsoft will not allow the OEM to distribute the hardware line
    without an OEM license without that specific line. Each line must be
    tested to make sure that all drivers will run with the licensed version
    of Windows. Furthermore, EVERY product in the PC line MUST be licensed
    to run Windows. If it uses an Intel or AMD chip, the OEM must license
    a version of Windows for it. Failure to do so could mean that ALL OEM
    licenses on ALL lines could be revoked or not renewed under favorable
    terms.

    Microsoft also subsidizes hardware vendor's research into "Windows
    Only/Linux Hostile" hardware. By definition, the hardware vendor must
    ONLY release drivers for Windows and must take legal actions against
    anyone who attempts to publish a driver for Linux.

    > Linux?
    > Better hope the hardware manufacturer has pity on Linux users or that some
    > pimple faced geek decides to reverse engineer a driver.


    Actually, most OEMs are now producing "Linux Friendly" lines. They are
    typically more expensive than the "Windows Only" lines, because the
    "Windows Only" lines haven't been as popular as expected and OEMs are
    cutting prices to dump the unsold surplus inventory. Demand for Linux
    Friendly machines seems to be very well-matched to the supply.

    Machines with graphics cards that have "GL" in the name are optimized
    for the OpenGL library contributed by Silicon Graphics Incorporated.
    Microsoft also supports OpenGL, but has been promoting DirectX instead.
    There is a DirectX to OpenGL library which is so good that this can be
    used to provide XP compatibility. Ironically, this library was written
    to make Windows games available to Linux.

    > We have been hearing for years that this year "insert year here" is the
    > year of desktop Linux and still it hasn't happened.


    People keep thinking that Linux will suddenly take over the desktop,
    without ever being displayed on retailer shelves. Most people want to
    "test drive" Linux before they go out and buy it.

    The good news is that LiveCDs have made it possible to see whether a
    Retailer PC will run Linux - BEFORE it is taken home. Furthermore,
    more OEMs are offering "Linux Friendly" systems along with Windows XP
    installation media to retail customers.

    In addition, Linux has vastly improved it's support for virtual
    machines and recently VMWare has provided far less expensive versions
    of VMware. Corporations can provide corporate controlled VMs to
    workstations running Linux which gives excellent security while
    providing full Windows compatibility.

    Roughly 1 Linux workstation is configured for every 2 Windows OEM
    machines sold in the last year. It used to be that people would buy a
    new computer that ran Windows and put Linux on the old box. Today,
    with 64 bit chips, dual-core chips, and 2-4 Ghz chips, many users are
    installing Linux then installing Windows XP as a client. Running XP as
    a client limits the memory available to a single instance of XP,
    enables Linux to provide firewall, damage control, and back-up/recovery
    capability, and the ability to move an image from one environment
    (desktop) to another (laptop), and move it back.

    This is a win-win scenario. Microsoft still sells millions of licenses
    to OEMs, and is still installed/licensed on 95% of the machines.
    Customers get the security, stability, and managibility of Linux.
    Corporate customers are able to get TCO benefits not available in
    Windows-only environments.

    This of course does make statistics such as OEM licenses less relevant.
    The machines are sold with OEM Windows, but then optimized with
    customer configured Linux. The difference is that the "Linux Friendly"
    machines can be configured in about 30 minutes with no searching for
    drivers and configuration tools.

    > Microsoft has screwed up left and right with one security problem after
    > another but yet it is still #1 and Linux isn't even on the radar screen
    > despite Linux being free.


    Ironically, one of the huge breakthroughs for this "Linux as host, XP
    as Client" configurations was the widespread use of Knoppix for back-up
    and recovery of Windows partitions. Another driver has been the need
    for multiple windows images to prevent "DLL Hell". Initially, users
    might use VMWare for Windows then realize that Windows is sucking up
    memory for functions not being used by the "host". Linux on the other
    hand, has a more effecient use of memory, so it's even possible to have
    a Linux host and then have a Linux client and a Windows client.

    > So why?
    >
    > Answer: Linux sucks for a desktop system for anyone other than a
    > vi/emacs/LaTex worshipping geek.


    Linux is far more than vi/emacs/LaTex, and the fact that you focus on
    those items, completely ignoring the other capabilities of Linux shows
    how totally ignorant you really are.

    On the other hand, a Linux-Only solution isn't for everyone. People
    who want to play video games, often need more than "pure Linux".
    People who need to use MS-Project, Visio, and other "Microsoft-only"
    applications need more than "pure Linux". This is why Linux provides
    support for Windows Applications based on the requirements of the
    application. Many Third-Party Windows applications, especially those
    not using .net, can run under WINE. Many others can be run under Xen
    or VMware with very little performance penalty. And for true "hard
    core Windows" applications, you can run under Bochs which can run 32
    bit Windows XP applications on ANY computer chip (but at a 30%
    performance penalty).

    > It's obvious.
    > A free product that has no market share?


    Actually, Linux has had huge penetration world-wide. The 7-10% market
    shares being observed as "machines sold with Linux" are mainly the
    "Linux Only" users, and in countries which have never had Windows
    machines, or environments where only certain tasks are required (point
    of sale, telemarketing, telephone customer support, network management,
    CAD/CAM,...) Linux-Only solutions are quite workable.

    On the other hand, the 90-95% of the PCs sold with Windows preinstalled
    may not be Windows-only boxes in their final configuration. They are
    just machines which need Windows licenses to legally run libraries used
    by WINE, access remote Windows servers using remote access, and run
    Windows VM Clients.

    In addition, Windows machines that really do continue to run Windows
    are often getting more and more Open Source and Linux software through
    cygwin, Qt, Java, and ported Linux applications. Users don't get the
    security, managability, backup/recovery capabilities, and reliability
    of Linux, but for many, especially people who only need to run Python
    applications (GUI applications written in python often provide GUI
    interfaces to *nix command-line applications), Java applications, and
    some crontab backup utilities, Windows may still be the host.

    > Conclusion: it sucks.


    Your conclusion, based on the information you have presented, shows
    your complete contempt prior to investigation. You appearantly haven't
    even used a live-cd version of Linux on a Linux-friendly Windows
    machine. You appearantly haven't studied any of the available
    statistics. You appearantly haven't even bothered to see which
    capabilities Linux has available.

    But that's OK, you aren't alone. There are hundreds of Windows
    Advocates posting in COLA who seem to think that they should publish
    their "expert opinion" based on a total lack of information.

    This reminds me very much of the Vietnam War. Enemy strength was
    estimated, body counts were taken, and when the body count totalled
    nearly 3 times the strength originally estimated, and the enemy was
    still hitting back, the United States realized that they were in a war
    the couldn't win.

    The enemy was hiding in tunnels, out of site, moving supplies by
    bicycle, foot carriers not wearing uniforms, and getting food and water
    from the jungles and villages of South Vietnam.

    Linux has been using similar tactics, staying below the radar, yet
    growing at phenominal rates. Only 7 years ago, the number of Linux
    survers were unknown, most CIOs and CEOs didn't even realize that they
    had Linux in their computer rooms. They didn't know that their e-mail,
    web site, file servers, print servers, and firewalls were all running
    on Linux. In one year the number of Linux servers went from something
    like 3% ot 17%, primarily because CIOs got very interested in Linux and
    really wanted to know how many Linux servers there were, what they were
    doing, and how well they were working. There were millions of Linux
    servers sitting in the farthest back corners, running without even a
    monitor, and running for months, even years, without rebooting, and
    with relatively little maintenance.

    This year, many CIOs began actively researching how many of their
    employees were using Open Source. They suddenly found that millions
    were using cygwin, OpenOffice, FireFox, and Thunderbird as well as many
    other popular open source applications.
     
    , Oct 23, 2005
    #15
  16. Corrie

    Kier Guest

    Re: Desktop Linux? Who cares?

    flatfish wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 21:33:16 -0400, flatfish wrote:
    >
    > > On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 01:30:11 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:
    > >
    > >> Corrie blithely blithered
    > >>> HP has "HP Reccomends Windows XP" on every page including the ones that
    > >>> offer Linux as an alternative OS.

    > >
    > >>> OpenOffice 2.0 install is easy for Windows users but a mess for Linux
    > >>> users.
    > >>
    > >> eh?
    > >>
    > >> ~# for a in *rpm; do rpm2tgz $a; done; rm *.rpm; installpkg *tgz
    > >>
    > >> Do that with a wizard.

    > >
    > > Thanks for the laugh!!!!!
    > >
    > > www.openoffice.org--->click on download--->click on setup.exe...
    > > done.....
    > >
    > > You must be kidding?

    >
    >
    > Oh I forgot to mention that this is a key reason why Linux is going
    > nowhere on the desktop.


    First you have to prove that Linux is in fact going nowhere on the
    desktop - and you can't. Because it *is* on the desktop, now. It may
    not be as widespread as some of us would like, but it's definitely
    going places at a rapid rate.

    >
    > That command you pulled from your inner bowels, how is Joe supposed to
    > know that?


    Perhaps, just possibly, by bothering to learn something? 'Joe' is not
    universally stupid. There are dozens of Linux books out there now,
    which will tell him pretty much all he needs to know, if he's willing
    to learn a bit. Most of it isn't hard to learn, either. And in many
    cases, it's just a point and click experience, like any other
    mainstream OS.

    >
    > You boobs in COLA are so far out of touch with the real world you might as
    > well be living on Mars.


    Since when did a nasty, lying troll like you consititute the 'real
    world', flatfish? You are so far from being real that you might as well
    be in another *Universe*. You're not fooling anyone.

    --
    Kier
     
    Kier, Oct 24, 2005
    #16
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