Dell laptop loses (won't re-establish) wireless connection when resuming from standby

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Oxford Systems, Mar 13, 2005.

  1. Anyone wanna help me help a friend with this problem? Great! Here's the
    problem as described:

    <quote>
    "On a Dell 8600 Win XP home laptop that has a wireless connection, lately,
    when the laptop's been idle for awhile, I can no longer log on to the
    Internet. The icons in the systray (the radio graph and the one that has
    little )))) marks next to it to show "sending out waves") show that there's
    a connection and that it's excellent, but in fact, I can't get online. I've
    tried fooling around with the connections, including "repairing," but to no
    avail (except once in awhile, something seems to kick in). I ultimately need
    to reboot, which would have saved me a lot of time if I had just done that
    right off the bat, but I always try in vain to fix the problem first. "
    </quote>

    My thoughts were that when the laptop goes to a low power/suspend mode, it
    was (of course) terminating the connection and not re-establishing on
    resume. So as a first stab I advised this:

    <quote>You might try releasing and then renewing the IP address on your
    wireless
    connection to bring it back to life when resuming from an idle state.

    To release, open the command line interface (start->run->cmd and then enter)
    and type "ipconfig /release" without the quotes and hit enter.

    To renew, type "ipconfig /renew" and hit enter.

    You can get some help and a list of available commands by typing
    "ipconfig/?" in the command line interface.

    If it works, you can run the release and renew commands directly in the
    "run" line (start->run) without opening the CLI on screen. Just go to start,
    run and enter either ipconfig /release or ipconfig /renew as needed.

    If it doesn't work, you can try manually disabling and re-enabling the
    wireless network connection adapter via control panel. MS has a knowledge
    base article on this (KB328747):

    1. Start the Network Connections tool in Control Panel. Click Start, click
    Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click
    Network Connections.

    2. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Disable.

    3. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Enable.

    </quote>

    Needless to say, my advice didn't work. I'm not able to lay my hands on this
    laptop myself and I'm not quite sure what to try next. The laptop is using a
    Dell/Broadcom OEM wireless PCI card and not the Intel "Centrino" branded
    solution. Suggestions?
    Oxford Systems, Mar 13, 2005
    #1
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  2. Re: Dell laptop loses (won't re-establish) wireless connection whenresuming from standby

    Oxford Systems wrote:
    > Anyone wanna help me help a friend with this problem? Great! Here's the
    > problem as described:
    >
    > <quote>
    > "On a Dell 8600 Win XP home laptop that has a wireless connection, lately,
    > when the laptop's been idle for awhile, I can no longer log on to the
    > Internet. The icons in the systray (the radio graph and the one that has
    > little )))) marks next to it to show "sending out waves") show that there's
    > a connection and that it's excellent, but in fact, I can't get online. I've
    > tried fooling around with the connections, including "repairing," but to no
    > avail (except once in awhile, something seems to kick in). I ultimately need
    > to reboot, which would have saved me a lot of time if I had just done that
    > right off the bat, but I always try in vain to fix the problem first. "
    > </quote>
    >
    > My thoughts were that when the laptop goes to a low power/suspend mode, it
    > was (of course) terminating the connection and not re-establishing on
    > resume. So as a first stab I advised this:
    >
    > <quote>You might try releasing and then renewing the IP address on your
    > wireless
    > connection to bring it back to life when resuming from an idle state.
    >
    > To release, open the command line interface (start->run->cmd and then enter)
    > and type "ipconfig /release" without the quotes and hit enter.
    >
    > To renew, type "ipconfig /renew" and hit enter.
    >
    > You can get some help and a list of available commands by typing
    > "ipconfig/?" in the command line interface.
    >
    > If it works, you can run the release and renew commands directly in the
    > "run" line (start->run) without opening the CLI on screen. Just go to start,
    > run and enter either ipconfig /release or ipconfig /renew as needed.
    >
    > If it doesn't work, you can try manually disabling and re-enabling the
    > wireless network connection adapter via control panel. MS has a knowledge
    > base article on this (KB328747):
    >
    > 1. Start the Network Connections tool in Control Panel. Click Start, click
    > Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click
    > Network Connections.
    >
    > 2. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Disable.
    >
    > 3. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Enable.
    >
    > </quote>
    >
    > Needless to say, my advice didn't work. I'm not able to lay my hands on this
    > laptop myself and I'm not quite sure what to try next. The laptop is using a
    > Dell/Broadcom OEM wireless PCI card and not the Intel "Centrino" branded
    > solution. Suggestions?


    Don't know if this is it or not, but XP's wireless zero configuration
    causes a shitload of problems for many people. If it's disabled it stops
    its infernal searching for other networks. If there's any config
    software for the wireless device use that to manually configure for the
    connection instead of allowing WZC.
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Mar 13, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Oxford Systems

    Jerry G. Guest

    Use an encryption, such as WEP with a password. You can then leave the
    router configuration for Broadcast, and be safe. This should allow the
    wireless lockup to be much quicker if the signal is lost. In any case, never
    have an active wireless network without encryption.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ======


    "Oxford Systems" <> wrote in message
    news:kgPYd.7906$...
    Anyone wanna help me help a friend with this problem? Great! Here's the
    problem as described:

    <quote>
    "On a Dell 8600 Win XP home laptop that has a wireless connection, lately,
    when the laptop's been idle for awhile, I can no longer log on to the
    Internet. The icons in the systray (the radio graph and the one that has
    little )))) marks next to it to show "sending out waves") show that there's
    a connection and that it's excellent, but in fact, I can't get online. I've
    tried fooling around with the connections, including "repairing," but to no
    avail (except once in awhile, something seems to kick in). I ultimately need
    to reboot, which would have saved me a lot of time if I had just done that
    right off the bat, but I always try in vain to fix the problem first. "
    </quote>

    My thoughts were that when the laptop goes to a low power/suspend mode, it
    was (of course) terminating the connection and not re-establishing on
    resume. So as a first stab I advised this:

    <quote>You might try releasing and then renewing the IP address on your
    wireless
    connection to bring it back to life when resuming from an idle state.

    To release, open the command line interface (start->run->cmd and then enter)
    and type "ipconfig /release" without the quotes and hit enter.

    To renew, type "ipconfig /renew" and hit enter.

    You can get some help and a list of available commands by typing
    "ipconfig/?" in the command line interface.

    If it works, you can run the release and renew commands directly in the
    "run" line (start->run) without opening the CLI on screen. Just go to start,
    run and enter either ipconfig /release or ipconfig /renew as needed.

    If it doesn't work, you can try manually disabling and re-enabling the
    wireless network connection adapter via control panel. MS has a knowledge
    base article on this (KB328747):

    1. Start the Network Connections tool in Control Panel. Click Start, click
    Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click
    Network Connections.

    2. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Disable.

    3. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Enable.

    </quote>

    Needless to say, my advice didn't work. I'm not able to lay my hands on this
    laptop myself and I'm not quite sure what to try next. The laptop is using a
    Dell/Broadcom OEM wireless PCI card and not the Intel "Centrino" branded
    solution. Suggestions?
    Jerry G., Mar 13, 2005
    #3
  4. "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > Oxford Systems wrote:
    >> Anyone wanna help me help a friend with this problem? Great! Here's the
    >> problem as described:
    >>
    >> <quote>
    >> "On a Dell 8600 Win XP home laptop that has a wireless connection,
    >> lately,
    >> when the laptop's been idle for awhile, I can no longer log on to the
    >> Internet. The icons in the systray (the radio graph and the one that has
    >> little )))) marks next to it to show "sending out waves") show that
    >> there's
    >> a connection and that it's excellent, but in fact, I can't get online.
    >> I've
    >> tried fooling around with the connections, including "repairing," but to
    >> no
    >> avail (except once in awhile, something seems to kick in). I ultimately
    >> need
    >> to reboot, which would have saved me a lot of time if I had just done
    >> that
    >> right off the bat, but I always try in vain to fix the problem first. "
    >> </quote>
    >>
    >> My thoughts were that when the laptop goes to a low power/suspend mode,
    >> it
    >> was (of course) terminating the connection and not re-establishing on
    >> resume. So as a first stab I advised this:
    >>
    >> <quote>You might try releasing and then renewing the IP address on your
    >> wireless
    >> connection to bring it back to life when resuming from an idle state.
    >>
    >> To release, open the command line interface (start->run->cmd and then
    >> enter)
    >> and type "ipconfig /release" without the quotes and hit enter.
    >>
    >> To renew, type "ipconfig /renew" and hit enter.
    >>
    >> You can get some help and a list of available commands by typing
    >> "ipconfig/?" in the command line interface.
    >>
    >> If it works, you can run the release and renew commands directly in the
    >> "run" line (start->run) without opening the CLI on screen. Just go to
    >> start,
    >> run and enter either ipconfig /release or ipconfig /renew as needed.
    >>
    >> If it doesn't work, you can try manually disabling and re-enabling the
    >> wireless network connection adapter via control panel. MS has a knowledge
    >> base article on this (KB328747):
    >>
    >> 1. Start the Network Connections tool in Control Panel. Click Start,
    >> click
    >> Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click
    >> Network Connections.
    >>
    >> 2. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Disable.
    >>
    >> 3. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Enable.
    >>
    >> </quote>
    >>
    >> Needless to say, my advice didn't work. I'm not able to lay my hands on
    >> this laptop myself and I'm not quite sure what to try next. The laptop is
    >> using a Dell/Broadcom OEM wireless PCI card and not the Intel "Centrino"
    >> branded solution. Suggestions?

    >
    > Don't know if this is it or not, but XP's wireless zero configuration
    > causes a shitload of problems for many people. If it's disabled it stops
    > its infernal searching for other networks. If there's any config software
    > for the wireless device use that to manually configure for the connection
    > instead of allowing WZC.


    Thanks! That put me on the trail and turned up an article at Wired
    (http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,63705,00.html) with a suggested
    workaround:

    .. Go to Control Panel.
    .. Choose Administrative Tools.
    .. Select Services. A two-pane window comes up.
    .. In the right-hand pane, scroll down and click Wireless Zero Configuration.
    .. Click Stop the Service. A progress bar may come up briefly.
    .. Click Start the Service. Again, a progress bar may come up.
    .. Close the Services window. At this point, the connection should come back.
    Oxford Systems, Mar 13, 2005
    #4
  5. Oxford Systems

    TT Guest

    I second this one...Wireless zero config gets great reviews for being
    an improved connection management tool but it's 50/50 for me on my
    machines...



    On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 06:08:25 GMT, Oxford Systems
    <> wrote:

    > "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    > news:eek:...
    >> Oxford Systems wrote:
    >>> Anyone wanna help me help a friend with this problem? Great! Here's the
    >>> problem as described:
    >>>
    >>> <quote>
    >>> "On a Dell 8600 Win XP home laptop that has a wireless connection,
    >>> lately,
    >>> when the laptop's been idle for awhile, I can no longer log on to the
    >>> Internet. The icons in the systray (the radio graph and the one that
    >>> has
    >>> little )))) marks next to it to show "sending out waves") show that
    >>> there's
    >>> a connection and that it's excellent, but in fact, I can't get online.
    >>> I've
    >>> tried fooling around with the connections, including "repairing," but
    >>> to
    >>> no
    >>> avail (except once in awhile, something seems to kick in). I ultimately
    >>> need
    >>> to reboot, which would have saved me a lot of time if I had just done
    >>> that
    >>> right off the bat, but I always try in vain to fix the problem first. "
    >>> </quote>
    >>>
    >>> My thoughts were that when the laptop goes to a low power/suspend mode,
    >>> it
    >>> was (of course) terminating the connection and not re-establishing on
    >>> resume. So as a first stab I advised this:
    >>>
    >>> <quote>You might try releasing and then renewing the IP address on
    >>> your
    >>> wireless
    >>> connection to bring it back to life when resuming from an idle state.
    >>>
    >>> To release, open the command line interface (start->run->cmd and then
    >>> enter)
    >>> and type "ipconfig /release" without the quotes and hit enter.
    >>>
    >>> To renew, type "ipconfig /renew" and hit enter.
    >>>
    >>> You can get some help and a list of available commands by typing
    >>> "ipconfig/?" in the command line interface.
    >>>
    >>> If it works, you can run the release and renew commands directly in the
    >>> "run" line (start->run) without opening the CLI on screen. Just go to
    >>> start,
    >>> run and enter either ipconfig /release or ipconfig /renew as needed.
    >>>
    >>> If it doesn't work, you can try manually disabling and re-enabling the
    >>> wireless network connection adapter via control panel. MS has a
    >>> knowledge
    >>> base article on this (KB328747):
    >>>
    >>> 1. Start the Network Connections tool in Control Panel. Click Start,
    >>> click
    >>> Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click
    >>> Network Connections.
    >>>
    >>> 2. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Disable.
    >>>
    >>> 3. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Enable.
    >>>
    >>> </quote>
    >>>
    >>> Needless to say, my advice didn't work. I'm not able to lay my hands on
    >>> this laptop myself and I'm not quite sure what to try next. The laptop
    >>> is
    >>> using a Dell/Broadcom OEM wireless PCI card and not the Intel
    >>> "Centrino"
    >>> branded solution. Suggestions?

    >>
    >> Don't know if this is it or not, but XP's wireless zero configuration
    >> causes a shitload of problems for many people. If it's disabled it stops
    >> its infernal searching for other networks. If there's any config
    >> software
    >> for the wireless device use that to manually configure for the
    >> connection
    >> instead of allowing WZC.

    >
    > Thanks! That put me on the trail and turned up an article at Wired
    > (http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,63705,00.html) with a suggested
    > workaround:
    >
    > . Go to Control Panel.
    > . Choose Administrative Tools.
    > . Select Services. A two-pane window comes up.
    > . In the right-hand pane, scroll down and click Wireless Zero
    > Configuration.
    > . Click Stop the Service. A progress bar may come up briefly.
    > . Click Start the Service. Again, a progress bar may come up.
    > . Close the Services window. At this point, the connection should come
    > back.
    >
    >




    --
    Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
    TT, Mar 13, 2005
    #5
  6. Oxford Systems

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Oxnard, tell your friend to stick that laptop up your ass side ways. That
    way you can be an expert's expert at something. ;-)

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Mar 13, 2005
    #6
  7. Oxford Systems

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Oxford Systems" <> wrote in message
    news:kgPYd.7906$...
    > Anyone wanna help me help a friend with this problem? Great! Here's the
    > problem as described:
    >
    > <quote>
    > "On a Dell 8600 Win XP home laptop that has a wireless connection, lately,
    > when the laptop's been idle for awhile, I can no longer log on to the
    > Internet. The icons in the systray (the radio graph and the one that has
    > little )))) marks next to it to show "sending out waves") show that
    > there's
    > a connection and that it's excellent, but in fact, I can't get online.
    > I've
    > tried fooling around with the connections, including "repairing," but to
    > no
    > avail (except once in awhile, something seems to kick in). I ultimately
    > need
    > to reboot, which would have saved me a lot of time if I had just done that
    > right off the bat, but I always try in vain to fix the problem first. "
    > </quote>
    >
    > My thoughts were that when the laptop goes to a low power/suspend mode, it
    > was (of course) terminating the connection and not re-establishing on
    > resume. So as a first stab I advised this:
    >
    > <quote>You might try releasing and then renewing the IP address on your
    > wireless
    > connection to bring it back to life when resuming from an idle state.
    >
    > To release, open the command line interface (start->run->cmd and then
    > enter)
    > and type "ipconfig /release" without the quotes and hit enter.
    >
    > To renew, type "ipconfig /renew" and hit enter.
    >
    > You can get some help and a list of available commands by typing
    > "ipconfig/?" in the command line interface.
    >
    > If it works, you can run the release and renew commands directly in the
    > "run" line (start->run) without opening the CLI on screen. Just go to
    > start,
    > run and enter either ipconfig /release or ipconfig /renew as needed.
    >
    > If it doesn't work, you can try manually disabling and re-enabling the
    > wireless network connection adapter via control panel. MS has a knowledge
    > base article on this (KB328747):
    >
    > 1. Start the Network Connections tool in Control Panel. Click Start, click
    > Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click
    > Network Connections.
    >
    > 2. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Disable.
    >
    > 3. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Enable.
    >
    > </quote>
    >
    > Needless to say, my advice didn't work. I'm not able to lay my hands on
    > this laptop myself and I'm not quite sure what to try next. The laptop is
    > using a Dell/Broadcom OEM wireless PCI card and not the Intel "Centrino"
    > branded solution. Suggestions?
    >
    >

    One other thing I've ran into is the wireless NIC is sometimes set to
    power-down when not in use, especially when the laptop is on battery. Check
    for those settings too.
    Toolman Tim, Mar 13, 2005
    #7
  8. Oxford Systems

    LoneRanger Guest

    I have the same problem on my 8600 using the built in LAN and a broadband
    connection. I can get my mail fine but the browser will not load a page
    (page not found errors) and /or any downloads I am doing stops cold. Nothing
    I try works aka..closing browser, repairing the connection , Rebooting the
    modem etc. I have to reboot to fix the problem. Any help much appreciated.

    "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:%X0Zd.5208$...
    >
    > "Oxford Systems" <> wrote in message
    > news:kgPYd.7906$...
    >> Anyone wanna help me help a friend with this problem? Great! Here's the
    >> problem as described:
    >>
    >> <quote>
    >> "On a Dell 8600 Win XP home laptop that has a wireless connection,
    >> lately,
    >> when the laptop's been idle for awhile, I can no longer log on to the
    >> Internet. The icons in the systray (the radio graph and the one that has
    >> little )))) marks next to it to show "sending out waves") show that
    >> there's
    >> a connection and that it's excellent, but in fact, I can't get online.
    >> I've
    >> tried fooling around with the connections, including "repairing," but to
    >> no
    >> avail (except once in awhile, something seems to kick in). I ultimately
    >> need
    >> to reboot, which would have saved me a lot of time if I had just done
    >> that
    >> right off the bat, but I always try in vain to fix the problem first. "
    >> </quote>
    >>
    >> My thoughts were that when the laptop goes to a low power/suspend mode,
    >> it
    >> was (of course) terminating the connection and not re-establishing on
    >> resume. So as a first stab I advised this:
    >>
    >> <quote>You might try releasing and then renewing the IP address on your
    >> wireless
    >> connection to bring it back to life when resuming from an idle state.
    >>
    >> To release, open the command line interface (start->run->cmd and then
    >> enter)
    >> and type "ipconfig /release" without the quotes and hit enter.
    >>
    >> To renew, type "ipconfig /renew" and hit enter.
    >>
    >> You can get some help and a list of available commands by typing
    >> "ipconfig/?" in the command line interface.
    >>
    >> If it works, you can run the release and renew commands directly in the
    >> "run" line (start->run) without opening the CLI on screen. Just go to
    >> start,
    >> run and enter either ipconfig /release or ipconfig /renew as needed.
    >>
    >> If it doesn't work, you can try manually disabling and re-enabling the
    >> wireless network connection adapter via control panel. MS has a knowledge
    >> base article on this (KB328747):
    >>
    >> 1. Start the Network Connections tool in Control Panel. Click Start,
    >> click
    >> Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click
    >> Network Connections.
    >>
    >> 2. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Disable.
    >>
    >> 3. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Enable.
    >>
    >> </quote>
    >>
    >> Needless to say, my advice didn't work. I'm not able to lay my hands on
    >> this laptop myself and I'm not quite sure what to try next. The laptop is
    >> using a Dell/Broadcom OEM wireless PCI card and not the Intel "Centrino"
    >> branded solution. Suggestions?
    >>
    >>

    > One other thing I've ran into is the wireless NIC is sometimes set to
    > power-down when not in use, especially when the laptop is on battery.
    > Check for those settings too.
    >
    LoneRanger, Mar 14, 2005
    #8
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