Dell 17" Monitor

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Fred, Aug 11, 2003.

  1. Fred

    Fred Guest

    Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!) There are
    two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go at
    DIY!
    TIA
    Fred
     
    Fred, Aug 11, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 19:02:30 +0100, "Fred"
    <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote:

    >Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    >causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!) There are
    >two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    >The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go at
    >DIY!
    >TIA
    >Fred


    I'd recommend against it unless you truly know what you're doing! Take
    it to a professional. That monitor holds enough charge to kill you,
    even while it's unplugged (and for a good amount of time after being
    unplugged).
     
    a 32 bit process, Aug 11, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Fred

    Mike0000 Guest

    Monitors have a capacitor that must be drained manually or it may very well
    kill you. Do not do this on your own. If you must then google for
    directions on how to discharge a monitor capacitor. Your life is worth a
    lot more than some cheap monitor made by Mlalysian 8 year olds in a Dell
    sweatshop.

    --
    Mike

    Block web ads
    http://everythingisnt.com/hosts.html

    "Fred" <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote in message
    news:bh8lnn$vl5ir$-berlin.de...
    > Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    > causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!) There

    are
    > two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    > The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go at
    > DIY!
    > TIA
    > Fred
    >
    >
     
    Mike0000, Aug 11, 2003
    #3
  4. Fred

    Jackie Guest

    "Mike0000" <> wrote in message
    news:c3RZa.121781$Ho3.15008@sccrnsc03...
    > Monitors have a capacitor that must be drained manually or it may very

    well
    > kill you. Do not do this on your own. If you must then google for
    > directions on how to discharge a monitor capacitor. Your life is worth a
    > lot more than some cheap monitor made by Mlalysian 8 year olds in a Dell
    > sweatshop.



    Believe it. I took a monitor apart that had been switched of for a couple of
    days. I touched something and got thrown across the room. I bought a new
    monitor and binned the old one.

    Jackie
     
    Jackie, Aug 11, 2003
    #4
  5. Fred

    Fred Guest

    Thank you all for your concerns - forgot to mention that when I was 12
    years old I built my first Super het and am quite au fait with Tv's,
    Microwave ovens , power supplies and Neon signs etc. and have had so many
    electrifying experiences, that over 50 years later my hair is still curly!
    So, please don't worry about my health ( I test for mains voltage (240V)
    with my finger!) anything more I use a meter.
    Just someone tell me how to get inside that case , svp.
    Fred

    "Fred" <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote in message
    news:bh8lnn$vl5ir$-berlin.de...
    > Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    > causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!) There

    are
    > two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    > The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go at
    > DIY!
    > TIA
    > Fred
    >
    >
     
    Fred, Aug 11, 2003
    #5
  6. Fred

    Kenny Guest

    Unless you know exactly what you're doing don't touch it, they are very
    dangerous even long after they're switched off. Take it to a good TV
    engineer.

    --

    Kenny


    "Fred" <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote in message
    news:bh8lnn$vl5ir$-berlin.de...
    > Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    > causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!) There

    are
    > two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    > The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go at
    > DIY!
    > TIA
    > Fred
    >
    >
     
    Kenny, Aug 11, 2003
    #6
  7. Fred

    Unknown Guest

    No more so than a TV. Some one lies (tells what a shock you can get) and
    then everyone swears to it. What utter nonsense.
    "Kenny" <> wrote in message
    news:bh8uud$vg3lm$-berlin.de...
    > Unless you know exactly what you're doing don't touch it, they are very
    > dangerous even long after they're switched off. Take it to a good TV
    > engineer.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Kenny
    >
    >
    > "Fred" <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > news:bh8lnn$vl5ir$-berlin.de...
    > > Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    > > causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!) There

    > are
    > > two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    > > The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go

    at
    > > DIY!
    > > TIA
    > > Fred
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Unknown, Aug 11, 2003
    #7
  8. Fred

    Mitch Guest

    In article <bh8vdd$u8qdg$-berlin.de>, Fred
    <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote:

    > Thank you all for your concerns - forgot to mention that when I was 12
    > years old I built my first Super het and am quite au fait with Tv's,
    > Microwave ovens , power supplies and Neon signs etc. and have had so many
    > electrifying experiences, that over 50 years later my hair is still curly!
    > So, please don't worry about my health ( I test for mains voltage (240V)
    > with my finger!) anything more I use a meter.
    > Just someone tell me how to get inside that case , svp.


    Most monitors I can think of have two screws behind the faceplate.

    The face then snaps onto the back case, so it might require a little
    squeezing to find the points that snap together.

    I have assembled the Dell 17, and I can't remember anything unusual
    about their case design right off.
     
    Mitch, Aug 11, 2003
    #8
  9. Fred

    paul s Guest

    On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 20:57:57 +0000, Unknown wrote:

    > No more so than a TV.


    Exactly. An opened monitor can be just as dangerous as a TV.

    >Some one lies (tells what a shock you can get) and
    > then everyone swears to it. What utter nonsense.


    Jesus H Christ

    On a 240V monitor, there are some large capacitors in the power-supply
    section which are charged upto about 420 volts DC, and will retain that
    charge for some hours when the thing is turned off and un-plugged. This
    can cause serious injury and may even kill if touched. The flyback
    transformer generates around 20,000 to 30,000 volts, this is lethal. Again
    this charge can be retained for several hours after switch off.

    I used to work in the TV repair trade for several years, so I do know the
    dangers.

    --
    Paul S
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    - Better to understand a little than to misunderstand a lot. -
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
     
    paul s, Aug 11, 2003
    #9
  10. Fred

    Patrick Guest

    Fred" <"Fred wrote:
    > Thank you all for your concerns - forgot to mention that when I was 12
    > years old I built my first Super het and am quite au fait with Tv's,
    > Microwave ovens , power supplies and Neon signs etc. and have had so
    > many electrifying experiences, that over 50 years later my hair is
    > still curly! So, please don't worry about my health ( I test for
    > mains voltage (240V) with my finger!) anything more I use a meter.
    > Just someone tell me how to get inside that case , svp.
    > Fred


    Might thiere not be two screws deep within recessed holes ?, (6 or 9 inch
    screwdriver)

    >
    > "Fred" <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > news:bh8lnn$vl5ir$-berlin.de...
    >> Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    >> causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!)
    >> There are two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming
    >> apart.
    >> The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a
    >> go at DIY!
    >> TIA
    >> Fred
     
    Patrick, Aug 11, 2003
    #10
  11. Fred

    paul s Guest

    On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 19:02:30 +0100, Fred wrote:

    > Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    > causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!) There are
    > two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    > The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go at
    > DIY!


    If there is a fault with that monitor, take it to a properly qualified
    professional servicer for a safe diagnosis and repair.

    There are voltages inside that monitor which can kill.

    --
    Paul S
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    - Time: Nature's way of keeping everything from happening at once. -
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
     
    paul s, Aug 11, 2003
    #11
  12. Fred

    Kenny Guest

    Hello Paul,
    Glad to see someone who knows what they're talking about. You'll know that
    one of the first rules in working with TV's or monitors is to safely
    discharge the mains rectifier capacitor and the CRT final anode but try
    telling that to some of the idiots here. I don't usually respond to them
    but couldn't help it when the rubbish they're spouting could maybe encourage
    someone to have a go at DIY repairs on a monitor and maybe put their lives
    at risk.

    --

    Kenny


    "paul s" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 20:57:57 +0000, Unknown wrote:
    >
    > > No more so than a TV.

    >
    > Exactly. An opened monitor can be just as dangerous as a TV.
    >
    > >Some one lies (tells what a shock you can get) and
    > > then everyone swears to it. What utter nonsense.

    >
    > Jesus H Christ
    >
    > On a 240V monitor, there are some large capacitors in the power-supply
    > section which are charged upto about 420 volts DC, and will retain that
    > charge for some hours when the thing is turned off and un-plugged. This
    > can cause serious injury and may even kill if touched. The flyback
    > transformer generates around 20,000 to 30,000 volts, this is lethal. Again
    > this charge can be retained for several hours after switch off.
    >
    > I used to work in the TV repair trade for several years, so I do know the
    > dangers.
    >
    > --
    > Paul S
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    > - Better to understand a little than to misunderstand a lot. -
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
     
    Kenny, Aug 11, 2003
    #12
  13. Fred

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 20:38:57 +0100, Jackie wrote:

    >
    > "Mike0000" <> wrote in message
    > news:c3RZa.121781$Ho3.15008@sccrnsc03...
    >> Monitors have a capacitor that must be drained manually or it may very

    > well
    >> kill you. Do not do this on your own. If you must then google for
    >> directions on how to discharge a monitor capacitor. Your life is worth a
    >> lot more than some cheap monitor made by Mlalysian 8 year olds in a Dell
    >> sweatshop.

    >
    >
    > Believe it. I took a monitor apart that had been switched of for a couple of
    > days. I touched something and got thrown across the room. I bought a new
    > monitor and binned the old one.
    >
    > Jackie


    1 there is never a need for an non-techie to open a monitor.

    2 The CRT can store a several thousand volt jolt for years.

    3 Even after the CRT has been discharged, it can recharge itself.

    4 I worked for 15 years repairing tv's and later on monitors.
     
    Meat Plow, Aug 12, 2003
    #13
  14. Fred

    Fred Guest

    Re: Dell 17" Monitor ( IT's FIXED !)

    replaced burnt out diode in power supply!
    Phew - judging by the dire warnings - I guess I'm lucky to be able to type
    this!
    Will I be able to join the techies now or do I have to learn secret hand
    shakes as well?

    Fred :)I

    "Fred" <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote in message
    news:bh8lnn$vl5ir$-berlin.de...
    > Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    > causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!) There

    are
    > two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    > The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go at
    > DIY!
    > TIA
    > Fred
    >
    >
     
    Fred, Aug 12, 2003
    #14
  15. Fred

    Sir_Grizzly Guest

    Re: Dell 17" Monitor ( IT's FIXED !)

    Fred" <"Fred wrote:
    > replaced burnt out diode in power supply!
    > Phew - judging by the dire warnings - I guess I'm lucky to be able
    > to type this!
    > Will I be able to join the techies now or do I have to learn secret
    > hand shakes as well?
    >


    If you're going to be playing in places like that you do NOT want a hand
    that shakes !
    ;-)


    --
    "Chaos, panic and disorder ... my work here
    is done."



    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.509 / Virus Database: 306 - Release Date: 8/12/2003
     
    Sir_Grizzly, Aug 13, 2003
    #15
  16. "Unknown" <> wrote Absolute hogwash.


    --
    zar 2k3 - ULC Reverend
    Certified Word Police Officer - Details Detail
    http://www.geocities.com/spamresources/spambots.htm
    http://www.drcnet.org/ http://www.abovegod.com/
    NuMbEr Tr3#3!!!!11! on a lits...

    "A man, a plan, a canoe, pasta, heros, rajahs,
    a coloratura, maps, snipe, percale, macaroni,
    a gag, a banana bag, a tan, a tag, a banana bag
    again (or a camel), a crepe, pins, Spam, a rut,
    a Rolo, cash, a jar, sore hats, a peon, a canal
    - Panama!"

    - Guy Steele Jr., CLTL2
     
    Monsignor Larville Jones MD, Aug 13, 2003
    #16
  17. Fred

    nemo Guest

    Re: Dell 17" Monitor DANGER!!! Plus the info you need if you're feeling brave

    <snip>

    I've been in electronics all my working life by the way, but I still treat
    TV sets and monitors with very great respect indeed. That's probably why I'm
    still here!!!

    You could die!!! But you needn't.

    Yes. Don't tackle it alone. Have someone else there to be on the safe side -
    preferably someone who knows how to do resuscitation or at least how to dial
    999 or 911.

    No. You don't have to discharge the EHT (Extra High Tension) capacitor
    manually. With it fully charged it'd be very dangerous to try. You wont have
    the right gear and if you use a length of wire it'd go with such a bang you
    might jump and injure yourself!

    (Actually, the capacitor is formed by the inner and outer metallic coatings
    of the tube. The lump people think is a capacitor is usually the EHT
    transformer/multiplier tray unit.)

    Just leave the monitor switched off for at least 4 hours. The charge leaks
    away. Then and only then, attach a wire to the chassis and probe around with
    the other end all over the EHT transformer assembly (the lump with a thick
    cable going to the side of the picture tube) in case there's any charge
    left. Hold the end you're probing with in a pair of heavily insulated pliers
    and keep one hand firmly in your pocket.

    Always keep one hand in your pocket while working on a monitor or TV and
    wear rubber boots if you've got them. DMs will do. A shock across the chest
    hand to hand and your heart stops and your dead! A shock from one hand to
    earth might make you jump or chuck you across the room but it's much less
    likely to kill you.

    That's the bad news. Take it very seriously though and reconsider if it's
    really a DIY job.

    Now. Do you know anything at all about electronics?? If not - all you can do
    is look around for anything obvious like a wire off, a dry joint (a soldered
    connection where the solder hasn't "taken" or where the solder hasn't been
    applied in the first place) or a burnt out component or blown fuse etc.

    You might be lucky. It might just be a fuse blown by a surge in the mains
    supply with nothing at all wrong with the monitor circuitry.

    The trouble with modern monitors and TV sets though, is the power supply. If
    anything goes wrong resulting in too much current being drawn or too high a
    voltage being detected, a "crowbar" circuit in the power supply blows the
    fuse. Then it's definitely a job for the experts.

    Anyway, to get the case off - AFTER THE MONITOR HAS BEEN LEFT SWITCHED OFF
    FOR AT LEAST 4 HOURS and with it face-down on a thick piece slab of foam
    rubber or suchlike to protect the picture tube - remove the screws, and
    particularly look for more screws cleverly hidden under labels, rubber feet
    etc. then look for the dreaded clips!

    These are internal clips that interlock the parts of the case and there are
    special tools and jigs for these which Dell won't let you have!! - OR
    instructions OR a blasted service manual!! (they'd rather you sent it to
    them and got palmed off with a manky old refurbished second-hand one - even
    when the one you sent is still under guarantee!)

    Look along inside all the slots in the case for the marks. Usually they're
    just slightly raised bits or glossy bits in the matt finish. Put a
    screwdriver in at a mark and sort of feel about while pulling against the
    parts of the case. Sometimes you have to prize one way, sometimes another.
    There's quite a knack to it. If this don't work, brute force is the only
    answer! Can't explain it better than that.

    Go around freeing the case clip by clip and when it finally comes apart
    there's also metal casing inside which has to be unscrewed.

    Once this is off, the various circuit boards are quite flimsily mounted and
    fragile so be careful. Be careful of the rear end of the picture tube too.
    Break this and the tube could implode and shower you with glass.

    You sure you wanna carry on with this?? :eek:)

    The bit you've got to be REALLY careful of is the EHT transformer assembly -
    the lump with a thick cable going to the side of the picture tube. It'll
    probably be covered in fine black soot (carbonised dust) which might be the
    trouble if you heard sizzling, ticking or cracking sounds from the monitor
    before it failed. The charge leaking through the soot can cause the EHT
    supply to draw too much current and as I said, cause the power supply
    circuit to blow the fuse.

    With one hand in your pocket, clean the soot off with iso-propyl alcohol or
    suchlike and smear a generous coating of silicone grease over the areas
    where the soot was. It's best to do this as a matter of routine. Then start
    looking for blown fuses, wires that have come off, dry joints etc.

    Don't try to do anything with the case off and the monitor switched on.
    Repair anything obvious that you find and put the case back together. If it
    doesn't work, you've done your best and you're still in one piece - so get
    it repaired professionally or buy a nice new one.

    That's about it. Good luck!

    I successfully repaired the monitor I'm looking at now. The fault was
    obvious. The sound of a whip cracking with the picture width diminishing at
    the same time. It wasn't enough to crowbar the power supply but there was a
    1 inch plus spark leaping rhythmically across the top of the EHT multiplier
    tray!! Quite spectacular it was!

    It was a combination of faulty insulation and the aforementioned soot build
    up and the same procedure cured it, and also cured TV which recently went
    the same way.

    But remember - getting a belt from the EHT of a 17" monitor is something
    like three times as bad as having a Tazer fired at you.

    Hope this helps, but do BE CAREFUL!!!!


    ( :eek:( :eek:( :eek:( :eek:( :eek:( :eek:( :eek:( :eek:( :eek:( :eek:( :eek:(

    Nemo
     
    nemo, Aug 16, 2003
    #17
  18. Fred

    nemo Guest

    Agreed. The EHT discharges itself after about 4 hours - that's how long I
    wait and I've not had a belt yet.

    Electronic Engineer speaking!

    Nemo

    Unknown <> wrote in message
    news:rpTZa.5593$...
    > Absolute hogwash.
    > "Jackie" <> wrote in message
    > news:bh8rcq$vjarc$-berlin.de...
    > >
    > > "Mike0000" <> wrote in message
    > > news:c3RZa.121781$Ho3.15008@sccrnsc03...
    > > > Monitors have a capacitor that must be drained manually or it may very

    > > well
    > > > kill you. Do not do this on your own. If you must then google for
    > > > directions on how to discharge a monitor capacitor. Your life is

    worth
    > a
    > > > lot more than some cheap monitor made by Mlalysian 8 year olds in a

    Dell
    > > > sweatshop.

    > >
    > >
    > > Believe it. I took a monitor apart that had been switched of for a

    couple
    > of
    > > days. I touched something and got thrown across the room. I bought a

    new
    > > monitor and binned the old one.
    > >
    > > Jackie
    > >
    > >

    >
     
    nemo, Aug 16, 2003
    #18
  19. Fred

    nemo Guest

    Re: Dell 17" Monitor OOPS!

    Fred <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote in message
    news:bh8vdd$u8qdg$-berlin.de...
    > Thank you all for your concerns - forgot to mention that when I was 12
    > years old I built my first Super het and am quite au fait with Tv's,
    > Microwave ovens , power supplies and Neon signs etc. and have had so many
    > electrifying experiences, that over 50 years later my hair is still curly!
    > So, please don't worry about my health ( I test for mains voltage (240V)
    > with my finger!) anything more I use a meter.
    > Just someone tell me how to get inside that case , svp.
    > Fred
    >
    > "Fred" <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > news:bh8lnn$vl5ir$-berlin.de...
    > > Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    > > causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!) There

    > are
    > > two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    > > The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go

    at
    > > DIY!
    > > TIA
    > > Fred
    > >

    In that case (pun) - I've been teaching my Grandmother to suck eggs then!!!
    You should have said earlier!!

    Makes for an interesting thread though.

    Same here. I started by buying components with my "Friday 6d" from a shop
    down the road to my Granny's in Cleveland Street and pulling 'em apart to
    see how they worked when I was about 9!!

    Good luck with those blasted clips!

    Nemo
     
    nemo, Aug 16, 2003
    #19
  20. Fred

    nemo Guest

    Unknown <> wrote in message
    news:prTZa.5595$...
    > No more so than a TV. Some one lies (tells what a shock you can get) and
    > then everyone swears to it. What utter nonsense.


    Me: Flamous last words!

    Unknown: I'll soon get der lid off diss ting! . . . . .

    (Grams: Zapppppp!!!)

    Unknown, reading stage directions: Wakes up on other side of room with
    badly bruised arse and ego!!!! (if lucky)

    Nemo

    Yes folks! I'm a Goon fan as well!! Well someone's got to keep them cool in
    this heatwave!

    news:alt.fan.goons



    > "Kenny" <> wrote in message
    > news:bh8uud$vg3lm$-berlin.de...
    > > Unless you know exactly what you're doing don't touch it, they are very
    > > dangerous even long after they're switched off. Take it to a good TV
    > > engineer.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > Kenny
    > >
    > >
    > > "Fred" <"Fred"@invalid.btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > > news:bh8lnn$vl5ir$-berlin.de...
    > > > Does anyone know how to expose the innards of a Dell Monitor without
    > > > causing too much damage? (i.e..: no sledge hammers nor hacksaws!)

    There
    > > are
    > > > two screws underneath, but the case is still not coming apart.
    > > > The darn thing won't switch on and I like to take a look and have a go

    > at
    > > > DIY!
    > > > TIA
    > > > Fred
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
     
    nemo, Aug 16, 2003
    #20
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