Delay when taking picture

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Kayla, Jun 29, 2004.

  1. Kayla

    Kayla Guest

    Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.

    Lori
     
    Kayla, Jun 29, 2004
    #1
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  2. "Kayla" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    > picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
    >
    > Lori


    No, any camera (digital or not) will have a delay after taking a picture.

    How much delay after taking the picture is acceptable to you?

    What camera are you currently using which shows this problem?

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jun 29, 2004
    #2
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  3. Kayla

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Kayla wrote:

    > Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    > picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
    >
    > Lori


    Well, are you talking about delay for focusing and light metering, which
    happens before the sensor is read for the image, or the delay after
    taking the picture while the camera stores the image to memory card and
    recharges the flash (if used)? If the former, certainly there are many
    newer cameras where this is little, if any, longer than similar times
    for film cameras, and if the latter, then many cameras will allow
    multiple shots to an internal buffer (mine allows 6 at highest
    resolution), but flash recharge affects ALL cameras.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jun 29, 2004
    #3
  4. Kayla

    Don F Guest

    "Kayla" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    > picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
    >
    > Lori

    -------------------
    It appears, from your post, that you have an older digital camera. I
    have Coolpix 950. I watch an hour glass (in the display) blink for 3 to 5
    seconds after taking a picture. Not acceptable at all.
    I also have the new Nikon D70 (DSLR) which can pop off 3 frames per
    second. This is both because of an internal memory buffer (mentioned in the
    above post) and the availability of high speed memory cards used in cameras
    that support them.
    There has been a steady improvement in technology from the time I bought
    my 950 and today so your camera (like my 950) is probably slow by today's
    standards.
    Don F
     
    Don F, Jun 29, 2004
    #4
  5. Kayla

    Kayla Guest

    Sorry. I worded that wrong. It's when I want to take a picture that
    I have the problem. I click and nothing happens for a bit and then
    the camera takes the picture. Very annoying especially at a parade.
    I have to point the camera just ahead of the subject so by the time
    the camera goes off hopefully the subject will still be in the
    picture. I have an Olympus D-460 which I really like but I am wanting
    to get a new one.

    Lori


    On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 07:48:10 -0500, Ron Hunter <>
    wrote:

    >Kayla wrote:
    >
    >> Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    >> picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
    >>
    >> Lori

    >
    >Well, are you talking about delay for focusing and light metering, which
    >happens before the sensor is read for the image, or the delay after
    >taking the picture while the camera stores the image to memory card and
    >recharges the flash (if used)? If the former, certainly there are many
    >newer cameras where this is little, if any, longer than similar times
    >for film cameras, and if the latter, then many cameras will allow
    >multiple shots to an internal buffer (mine allows 6 at highest
    >resolution), but flash recharge affects ALL cameras.
     
    Kayla, Jun 29, 2004
    #5
  6. Kayla

    John Guest

    "Kayla" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sorry. I worded that wrong. It's when I want to take a picture that
    > I have the problem. I click and nothing happens for a bit and then
    > the camera takes the picture. Very annoying especially at a parade.
    > I have to point the camera just ahead of the subject so by the time
    > the camera goes off hopefully the subject will still be in the
    > picture. I have an Olympus D-460 which I really like but I am wanting
    > to get a new one.
    >
    > Lori


    I had the same concerns with my Sony DSC-P1 (had at least a 1/2 second delay
    on shutter and a 5 second recycle time before ready to take another
    picture). I recently purchased a Nikon D70 which takes the picture at the
    exact same time I press the shutter release (or at least close enough I
    can't tell the difference) and can save up to four 6-megapixel JPG images
    per SECOND. The D70 may be more than you want to spend, but the newer
    generation of digital cameras tend to be much faster than earlier
    generations, so I'd suggest going to a store where you can test out a few
    and see what suits you best. Good luck!

    - John
     
    John, Jun 29, 2004
    #6
  7. "Don F" <> wrote in message
    news:z7eEc.33343$cj3.18711@lakeread01...
    []
    > It appears, from your post, that you have an older digital camera. I
    > have Coolpix 950. I watch an hour glass (in the display) blink for 3 to

    5
    > seconds after taking a picture. Not acceptable at all.

    []
    > Don F


    On its successor - the Nikon Coolpix 990 - you can select to either have a
    review delay or not (firmware V1.1). I don't know if there was an
    equivalent firmware upgrade for the 950.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jun 29, 2004
    #7
  8. Kayla

    Jeff Durham Guest

    If I understand what you are saying, it's not the time that it takes to save
    the picture, but rather the time it takes for the camera to actually take
    the picture when the button is pushed. In a moving picture, you have to
    snap the camera well ahead of the action in order for the picture to be
    taken at the correct time.

    Prior to depressing the button all the way, do you hold it halfway down to
    compose the shot and the press it the rest of the way to take the picture?
    I never noticed this problem with my Kodak DC240 as long as I composed the
    picture by depressing the shutter button halfway first.

    Jeff


    "Kayla" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    > picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
    >
    > Lori
     
    Jeff Durham, Jun 29, 2004
    #8
  9. Kayla

    Gorf Guest

    > Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    > picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.


    Try pushing the shutter button halfway down to set the exposure and focus.
    Keep it there until you have the shot you want, then push it all the way
    down.
     
    Gorf, Jun 29, 2004
    #9
  10. Kayla <> writes:
    >> Kayla wrote:


    >>> Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking
    >>> the picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.


    > Sorry. I worded that wrong. It's when I want to take a picture
    > that I have the problem. I click and nothing happens for a bit and
    > then the camera takes the picture. Very annoying especially at a
    > parade. I have to point the camera just ahead of the subject so by
    > the time the camera goes off hopefully the subject will still be in
    > the picture. I have an Olympus D-460 which I really like but I am
    > wanting to get a new one.


    This is known as shutter lag and affects digital compacts (some
    more than others)

    There exist digital cameras without (perceptible) shutter delay.
    These cameras belong to the class of cameras called "DSLR". They are
    generally larger and heavier than compacts and the budget versions
    (Canon Digital Rebel and Nikon D70) cost from around $900.
    A word of warning: Moving from a D-460 will be a big step, and if
    what you basically is after is a P&S camera, a DSLR is probably not
    what you want.

    Back to compacts: I have never used the D-460, but it is quite old, so
    it I would guess that if you bought a current compact digital camera,
    you would find that it was much faster that your Oly D-460. Note: It
    still would have a shutter delay - but maybe so short that you could
    live with it. You should check out tests - many measure and list
    shutter lag along with other technical details of the camera under
    review. DPreview http://www.depreview.com/ is an excellent resource
    for this.

    There are also some "tricks" you can use with modern compacts to
    minimize shutter lag:

    Half-press trick: Press shutter halfway down to pre-focus on the
    subject. This works on most modern compacts.

    Hyperfocal distance trick: Switch to manual, zoom out to wide angle
    and stop down to f/5.6 or f/8, and preset focus to the hyperfocal
    distance (on a G5 at 7.2mm, f/5.6 the hyperfocal distance is 5.1
    feet - giving you a DOF from 2.5 feet to infinity!) You need
    to have a camera with manual controls to do this.
    --
    - gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
    ========================================================================
    «To live outside the law, you must be honest.» (Bob Dylan)
     
    Gisle Hannemyr, Jun 29, 2004
    #10
  11. Gisle Hannemyr wrote:

    > Kayla <> writes:
    >
    >>>Kayla wrote:

    >
    >
    >>>>Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking
    >>>>the picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.

    >
    >
    >>Sorry. I worded that wrong. It's when I want to take a picture
    >>that I have the problem. I click and nothing happens for a bit and
    >>then the camera takes the picture. Very annoying especially at a
    >>parade. I have to point the camera just ahead of the subject so by
    >>the time the camera goes off hopefully the subject will still be in
    >>the picture. I have an Olympus D-460 which I really like but I am
    >>wanting to get a new one.

    >
    >
    > This is known as shutter lag and affects digital compacts (some
    > more than others)
    >
    > There exist digital cameras without (perceptible) shutter delay.
    > These cameras belong to the class of cameras called "DSLR". They are
    > generally larger and heavier than compacts and the budget versions
    > (Canon Digital Rebel and Nikon D70) cost from around $900.
    > A word of warning: Moving from a D-460 will be a big step, and if
    > what you basically is after is a P&S camera, a DSLR is probably not
    > what you want.
    >
    > Back to compacts: I have never used the D-460, but it is quite old, so
    > it I would guess that if you bought a current compact digital camera,
    > you would find that it was much faster that your Oly D-460. Note: It
    > still would have a shutter delay - but maybe so short that you could
    > live with it. You should check out tests - many measure and list
    > shutter lag along with other technical details of the camera under
    > review. DPreview http://www.depreview.com/ is an excellent resource
    > for this.
    >
    > There are also some "tricks" you can use with modern compacts to
    > minimize shutter lag:
    >
    > Half-press trick: Press shutter halfway down to pre-focus on the
    > subject. This works on most modern compacts.
    >
    > Hyperfocal distance trick: Switch to manual, zoom out to wide angle
    > and stop down to f/5.6 or f/8, and preset focus to the hyperfocal
    > distance (on a G5 at 7.2mm, f/5.6 the hyperfocal distance is 5.1
    > feet - giving you a DOF from 2.5 feet to infinity!) You need
    > to have a camera with manual controls to do this.


    Those are what I used on a Canon G-3 and they helped a bunch. That, and
    a bit of panning motion, should be great for a parade. Just remember to
    continue the pan after you've pushed the shutter button.

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 29, 2004
    #11
  12. Kayla

    Kayla Guest

    Thanks everyone for getting back to me and the advice. I have
    outgrown the Olympus D-460 and am ready for something newer and more
    challenging to work with. I got a gift of money from my co-workers
    when I retired which I want to put towards a new camera and DSLR
    sounds like what I want. Don't really understand it but I can learn
    because now I have all the time in the world. ;-)

    Lori
     
    Kayla, Jun 29, 2004
    #12
  13. Kayla

    Tammy Guest

    DIGITAL SLRs DON'T HAVE THATDELAY PROBLEM


    "Kayla" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    > picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
    >
    > Lori
     
    Tammy, Jun 29, 2004
    #13
  14. "Kayla" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks everyone for getting back to me and the advice. I have
    > outgrown the Olympus D-460 and am ready for something newer and more
    > challenging to work with. I got a gift of money from my co-workers
    > when I retired which I want to put towards a new camera and DSLR
    > sounds like what I want. Don't really understand it but I can learn
    > because now I have all the time in the world. ;-)
    >
    > Lori


    Lori,

    It might be worthwhile taking the time to understand what you are
    committing to when purchasing a DSLR - it has different trade-offs to a
    point-and-shoot. In particular, weight, bulk (with extra lenses), cost
    (e.g. of extra lenses), lack of electronic image preview etc. I'm not
    saying don't go that route, but investigate it well first.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jun 29, 2004
    #14
  15. Kayla

    Frank ess Guest

    Kayla wrote:
    > Thanks everyone for getting back to me and the advice. I have
    > outgrown the Olympus D-460 and am ready for something newer and more
    > challenging to work with. I got a gift of money from my co-workers
    > when I retired which I want to put towards a new camera and DSLR
    > sounds like what I want. Don't really understand it but I can learn
    > because now I have all the time in the world. ;-)
    >
    > Lori


    1. Now that you are retired, life accellerates. You will wonder how you
    ever found time to go to a job.

    2. Being retired isn't the perfect job: you never get a day off.

    3. It is preferable to the alternative.


    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Jun 29, 2004
    #15
  16. Kayla

    M Barnes Guest

    Tammy wrote:

    > DIGITAL SLRs DON'T HAVE THAT
    > DELAY PROBLEM


    Just make sure you don't have the mirror anti-shock
    delay set to ON.

    And they do, actually.
     
    M Barnes, Jun 29, 2004
    #16
  17. Kayla

    Anoni Moose Guest

    "Gorf" <> wrote in message news:<kogEc.540$>...
    > > Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    > > picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.

    >
    > Try pushing the shutter button halfway down to set the exposure and focus.
    > Keep it there until you have the shot you want, then push it all the way
    > down.


    My wife's new Sony DSC-P100 has insignificant delay when taking a
    photo (unlike previous digital cameras). It's ready for it's first
    photo after about only one second from hitting the power-on switch!

    Mike
     
    Anoni Moose, Jun 29, 2004
    #17
  18. Kayla

    adm Guest

    "Anoni Moose" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Gorf" <> wrote in message

    news:<kogEc.540$>...
    > > > Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
    > > > picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.

    > >
    > > Try pushing the shutter button halfway down to set the exposure and

    focus.
    > > Keep it there until you have the shot you want, then push it all the way
    > > down.

    >
    > My wife's new Sony DSC-P100 has insignificant delay when taking a
    > photo (unlike previous digital cameras). It's ready for it's first
    > photo after about only one second from hitting the power-on switch!


    Nikon D70 will be ready to take a picture in less time than it takes you to
    turn it on and then press the shutter button. Caveats apply of course
    depending on whether it is set to focus or shoot priority.

    Anyway - bottom line is that in real life, the shutter lag is negligible
     
    adm, Jun 29, 2004
    #18
  19. Kayla

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Kayla wrote:

    > Sorry. I worded that wrong. It's when I want to take a picture that
    > I have the problem. I click and nothing happens for a bit and then
    > the camera takes the picture. Very annoying especially at a parade.
    > I have to point the camera just ahead of the subject so by the time
    > the camera goes off hopefully the subject will still be in the
    > picture. I have an Olympus D-460 which I really like but I am wanting
    > to get a new one.
    >
    > Lori


    Yes, that was a problem with earlier cameras. Most of the newer ones
    have gotten this delay time down to something reasonable. It IS still
    hard to get sports action, but the delay can be minimized by
    'prefocusing', or using a setting that sets the camera for a fixed focus
    and then only has to read the light and set the exposure time. In
    short, stick with the newest cameras in each line and you shouldn't be
    bothered by this problem any more.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jun 30, 2004
    #19
  20. Kayla

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Gisle Hannemyr wrote:

    > Kayla <> writes:
    >
    >>>Kayla wrote:

    >
    >
    >>>>Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking
    >>>>the picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.

    >
    >
    >>Sorry. I worded that wrong. It's when I want to take a picture
    >>that I have the problem. I click and nothing happens for a bit and
    >>then the camera takes the picture. Very annoying especially at a
    >>parade. I have to point the camera just ahead of the subject so by
    >>the time the camera goes off hopefully the subject will still be in
    >>the picture. I have an Olympus D-460 which I really like but I am
    >>wanting to get a new one.

    >
    >
    > This is known as shutter lag and affects digital compacts (some
    > more than others)
    >
    > There exist digital cameras without (perceptible) shutter delay.
    > These cameras belong to the class of cameras called "DSLR". They are
    > generally larger and heavier than compacts and the budget versions
    > (Canon Digital Rebel and Nikon D70) cost from around $900.
    > A word of warning: Moving from a D-460 will be a big step, and if
    > what you basically is after is a P&S camera, a DSLR is probably not
    > what you want.
    >
    > Back to compacts: I have never used the D-460, but it is quite old, so
    > it I would guess that if you bought a current compact digital camera,
    > you would find that it was much faster that your Oly D-460. Note: It
    > still would have a shutter delay - but maybe so short that you could
    > live with it. You should check out tests - many measure and list
    > shutter lag along with other technical details of the camera under
    > review. DPreview http://www.depreview.com/ is an excellent resource
    > for this.
    >
    > There are also some "tricks" you can use with modern compacts to
    > minimize shutter lag:
    >
    > Half-press trick: Press shutter halfway down to pre-focus on the
    > subject. This works on most modern compacts.
    >
    > Hyperfocal distance trick: Switch to manual, zoom out to wide angle
    > and stop down to f/5.6 or f/8, and preset focus to the hyperfocal
    > distance (on a G5 at 7.2mm, f/5.6 the hyperfocal distance is 5.1
    > feet - giving you a DOF from 2.5 feet to infinity!) You need
    > to have a camera with manual controls to do this.


    Newer P&S cameras have various settings, usually on a dial, that do this
    for you, even if they don't have full manual settings. Many will even
    let you save your own manual settings for quick access on the dial. P&S
    cameras have come farther than dSLRs in the past year with features even
    some DSLRs didn't have a year or two ago.
    Kodak's DX7440 and 7630 both have many such features, lacking only full
    manual focus for the 'manual freaks'.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jun 30, 2004
    #20
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