DEAD HARD DRIVE Problem

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Tony, Oct 23, 2003.

  1. Tony

    Tony Guest

    I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All computers came back up except
    one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though they thought it was). I was
    called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is no power.

    It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an identical drive and replace the circuit
    board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should spin but there is no guarantee
    that the data is still intact. But, first things first.

    I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there. .... Some have WD400AB and
    some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.

    Tony
     
    Tony, Oct 23, 2003
    #1
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  2. Sometimes you can start a non-rotating hard drive by holding it in your
    hand and giving it a quick "radial snap". This is hard to describe, but
    I've done it quite a few times. You want a sudden, "snap" rotary motion
    around the axis of the spindle. I wish I could describe it, but I don't
    know a good way to do so.

    I'm not sure if changing the PC Board will work or not. Some drives
    have data stored in memory on the PCB which is specific to that
    particular drive and which was put there by the factory during the mfgr.
    process. I'd call WD on that one. Of course, the motor itself is not
    on the PCB.

    Tony wrote:
    > I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All computers came back up except
    > one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though they thought it was). I was
    > called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is no power.
    >
    > It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an identical drive and replace the circuit
    > board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should spin but there is no guarantee
    > that the data is still intact. But, first things first.
    >
    > I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there. .... Some have WD400AB and
    > some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.
    >
    > Tony
     
    Barry Watzman, Oct 23, 2003
    #2
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  3. Tony

    Jerry Guest

    You can sometimes get a hard drive to work for a short time by putting it in
    the freezer. I was told this on the tv show techtv and it worked for me.
    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sometimes you can start a non-rotating hard drive by holding it in your
    > hand and giving it a quick "radial snap". This is hard to describe, but
    > I've done it quite a few times. You want a sudden, "snap" rotary motion
    > around the axis of the spindle. I wish I could describe it, but I don't
    > know a good way to do so.
    >
    > I'm not sure if changing the PC Board will work or not. Some drives
    > have data stored in memory on the PCB which is specific to that
    > particular drive and which was put there by the factory during the mfgr.
    > process. I'd call WD on that one. Of course, the motor itself is not
    > on the PCB.
    >
    > Tony wrote:
    > > I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All

    computers came back up except
    > > one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though

    they thought it was). I was
    > > called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is no

    power.
    > >
    > > It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an identical

    drive and replace the circuit
    > > board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should

    spin but there is no guarantee
    > > that the data is still intact. But, first things first.
    > >
    > > I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there.

    ..... Some have WD400AB and
    > > some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.
    > >
    > > Tony

    >
     
    Jerry, Oct 23, 2003
    #3
  4. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Would this work for a hard drive that is completely power-free? It isnt as if the drive starts and
    clicks or is unreadable. There is no spin or any power at all.

    Tony


    On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 14:51:22 GMT, "Jerry" <> wrote:

    >You can sometimes get a hard drive to work for a short time by putting it in
    >the freezer. I was told this on the tv show techtv and it worked for me.
    >"Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Sometimes you can start a non-rotating hard drive by holding it in your
    >> hand and giving it a quick "radial snap". This is hard to describe, but
    >> I've done it quite a few times. You want a sudden, "snap" rotary motion
    >> around the axis of the spindle. I wish I could describe it, but I don't
    >> know a good way to do so.
    >>
    >> I'm not sure if changing the PC Board will work or not. Some drives
    >> have data stored in memory on the PCB which is specific to that
    >> particular drive and which was put there by the factory during the mfgr.
    >> process. I'd call WD on that one. Of course, the motor itself is not
    >> on the PCB.
    >>
    >> Tony wrote:
    >> > I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All

    >computers came back up except
    >> > one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though

    >they thought it was). I was
    >> > called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is no

    >power.
    >> >
    >> > It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an identical

    >drive and replace the circuit
    >> > board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should

    >spin but there is no guarantee
    >> > that the data is still intact. But, first things first.
    >> >
    >> > I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there.

    >.... Some have WD400AB and
    >> > some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.
    >> >
    >> > Tony

    >>

    >
     
    Tony, Oct 23, 2003
    #4
  5. I would make sure he understands that the data has a real good chance of
    never being recovered, and that anything you do to the drive, could in fact
    excaserbate (sp?) that problem. As he is an attorney, i would cover my ass
    good on that one. Then if he says go ahead, you have a chance to experiment
    with some different things. I doubt the freezer thing would work,
    especially if the computer has been off for a while, and still doesn't come
    up, but hey, it is easy and doesn't cost anything to try. The circuit board
    thing may or may not work because of people said here, but if you have
    another drive, might be worth checking. You might also check the circuit
    board very carefully around the power input, to see if there might be some
    sign of a damaged part, and then try to replace that. Might take some
    careful soldering.

    Western Digital probably won't be much help, but hey, can't hurt to call.

    --
    Kendal R. Emery, MCSE, Network+, A+, MCNGP #19
    Systems Administrator
    Coordinated Home Care

    remove me to email to me
    "Tony" < > wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All

    computers came back up except
    > one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though they

    thought it was). I was
    > called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is no

    power.
    >
    > It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an identical

    drive and replace the circuit
    > board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should spin

    but there is no guarantee
    > that the data is still intact. But, first things first.
    >
    > I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there. ....

    Some have WD400AB and
    > some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.
    >
    > Tony
     
    Simon Telrenner, Oct 23, 2003
    #5
  6. On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 04:23:36 GMT, Tony < > wrote:

    >I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All computers came back up except
    >one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though they thought it was). I was
    >called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is no power.
    >
    >It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an identical drive and replace the circuit
    >board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should spin but there is no guarantee
    >that the data is still intact. But, first things first.
    >
    >I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there. .... Some have WD400AB and
    >some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.
    >
    >Tony


    Get an electronics tech to see if there are any open fuses on the HDD
    power inputs.

    Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Oct 23, 2003
    #6
  7. Tony

    Tony Guest

    The connectors have power (12v gnd gnd 5v)

    BUT.. there is no power where there are 4 other connectors are *that actually connect to the circuit
    board). So, something is blown along the way. I really need to get ahold of an identical drive's
    circuit board. That is my best bet.

    Tony



    On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 19:25:58 GMT, Tom MacIntyre <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 04:23:36 GMT, Tony < > wrote:
    >
    >>I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All computers came back up except
    >>one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though they thought it was). I was
    >>called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is no power.
    >>
    >>It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an identical drive and replace the circuit
    >>board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should spin but there is no guarantee
    >>that the data is still intact. But, first things first.
    >>
    >>I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there. .... Some have WD400AB and
    >>some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.
    >>
    >>Tony

    >
    >Get an electronics tech to see if there are any open fuses on the HDD
    >power inputs.
    >
    >Tom
     
    Tony, Oct 24, 2003
    #7
  8. Tony

    Tony Guest

    I am going to buy an identical drive as you suggested. I only need to borrow the circuit board for
    an hour. The attorney does not want the drive back, just the data. So, once I access it, I can burn
    the data to cdr and then replace the circuit board on the new drive. It will be brand new and I can
    always use it or sell it. The drive will have 0 hours on it.

    Tony


    On Fri, 24 Oct 2003 11:10:43 -0400, "Glenn \(SBfan2000\)" <> wrote:

    >I dought the replacing the circuit board would help since it contains info
    >about the drive and its platters! I once tried to remove the platters and
    >place them in a new drive (same model) and it worked! (I still have that
    >drive laying around somewhere, it was a 106MB drive!) However that was long
    >ago when the platters where big and there were only two or three! Todays
    >drives can have more than that and one small mistake, a scratch,
    >fingerprint, of dust can ruin the platters! A piece of dust would be like a
    >mountain to the read heads! Plus I havn't opened a drive in years, things
    >use to be held together with screws but todays manufactures use alot of
    >fasteners that are not easily removable! It would certainly take alot of
    >skill and luck! If the attorney is willing to spend the money I would buy
    >an identical drive and try replacing the circuit board (first test the
    >existing) and if that doesn't work you can try more drastice measures!
    >
    >Glenn
    >"Tony" < > wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Would this work for a hard drive that is completely power-free? It isnt

    >as if the drive starts and
    >> clicks or is unreadable. There is no spin or any power at all.
    >>
    >> Tony
    >>
    >>
    >> On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 14:51:22 GMT, "Jerry" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >You can sometimes get a hard drive to work for a short time by putting it

    >in
    >> >the freezer. I was told this on the tv show techtv and it worked for me.
    >> >"Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    >> >news:...
    >> >> Sometimes you can start a non-rotating hard drive by holding it in your
    >> >> hand and giving it a quick "radial snap". This is hard to describe,

    >but
    >> >> I've done it quite a few times. You want a sudden, "snap" rotary

    >motion
    >> >> around the axis of the spindle. I wish I could describe it, but I

    >don't
    >> >> know a good way to do so.
    >> >>
    >> >> I'm not sure if changing the PC Board will work or not. Some drives
    >> >> have data stored in memory on the PCB which is specific to that
    >> >> particular drive and which was put there by the factory during the

    >mfgr.
    >> >> process. I'd call WD on that one. Of course, the motor itself is not
    >> >> on the PCB.
    >> >>
    >> >> Tony wrote:
    >> >> > I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All
    >> >computers came back up except
    >> >> > one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though
    >> >they thought it was). I was
    >> >> > called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is

    >no
    >> >power.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an

    >identical
    >> >drive and replace the circuit
    >> >> > board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should
    >> >spin but there is no guarantee
    >> >> > that the data is still intact. But, first things first.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there.
    >> >.... Some have WD400AB and
    >> >> > some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Tony
    >> >>
    >> >

    >>

    >
     
    Tony, Oct 24, 2003
    #8
  9. This drive should be cheap, $20 to $40.

    In the WD drive series, the "AB" drives are the econcomy drives (very
    slow access times), the "BB" are the standard 7200 RPM drives, and the
    "JB" are the premium "special edition" drives. The drive that you have
    is the lowest end drive that they make, and only 40 gigs. You may have
    a hard time finding a new one. But on E-Bay, you might find a "dead"
    drive for $1 or $2 which will probably have a perfectly good circuit board.

    Understand that, as noted previously, this entire approach may not work,
    but if you are out of other suggestions, it's worth trying.


    Tony wrote:

    > I am going to buy an identical drive as you suggested. I only need to borrow the circuit board for
    > an hour. The attorney does not want the drive back, just the data. So, once I access it, I can burn
    > the data to cdr and then replace the circuit board on the new drive. It will be brand new and I can
    > always use it or sell it. The drive will have 0 hours on it.
    >
    > Tony
    >
    >
    > On Fri, 24 Oct 2003 11:10:43 -0400, "Glenn \(SBfan2000\)" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I dought the replacing the circuit board would help since it contains info
    >>about the drive and its platters! I once tried to remove the platters and
    >>place them in a new drive (same model) and it worked! (I still have that
    >>drive laying around somewhere, it was a 106MB drive!) However that was long
    >>ago when the platters where big and there were only two or three! Todays
    >>drives can have more than that and one small mistake, a scratch,
    >>fingerprint, of dust can ruin the platters! A piece of dust would be like a
    >>mountain to the read heads! Plus I havn't opened a drive in years, things
    >>use to be held together with screws but todays manufactures use alot of
    >>fasteners that are not easily removable! It would certainly take alot of
    >>skill and luck! If the attorney is willing to spend the money I would buy
    >>an identical drive and try replacing the circuit board (first test the
    >>existing) and if that doesn't work you can try more drastice measures!
    >>
    >>Glenn
    >>"Tony" < > wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>
    >>>Would this work for a hard drive that is completely power-free? It isnt

    >>
    >>as if the drive starts and
    >>
    >>>clicks or is unreadable. There is no spin or any power at all.
    >>>
    >>>Tony
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 14:51:22 GMT, "Jerry" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>You can sometimes get a hard drive to work for a short time by putting it

    >>
    >>in
    >>
    >>>>the freezer. I was told this on the tv show techtv and it worked for me.
    >>>>"Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:...
    >>>>
    >>>>>Sometimes you can start a non-rotating hard drive by holding it in your
    >>>>>hand and giving it a quick "radial snap". This is hard to describe,

    >>
    >>but
    >>
    >>>>>I've done it quite a few times. You want a sudden, "snap" rotary

    >>
    >>motion
    >>
    >>>>>around the axis of the spindle. I wish I could describe it, but I

    >>
    >>don't
    >>
    >>>>>know a good way to do so.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I'm not sure if changing the PC Board will work or not. Some drives
    >>>>>have data stored in memory on the PCB which is specific to that
    >>>>>particular drive and which was put there by the factory during the

    >>
    >>mfgr.
    >>
    >>>>>process. I'd call WD on that one. Of course, the motor itself is not
    >>>>>on the PCB.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Tony wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All
    >>>>
    >>>>computers came back up except
    >>>>
    >>>>>>one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though
    >>>>
    >>>>they thought it was). I was
    >>>>
    >>>>>>called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is

    >>
    >>no
    >>
    >>>>power.
    >>>>
    >>>>>>It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an

    >>
    >>identical
    >>
    >>>>drive and replace the circuit
    >>>>
    >>>>>>board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should
    >>>>
    >>>>spin but there is no guarantee
    >>>>
    >>>>>>that the data is still intact. But, first things first.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there.
    >>>>
    >>>>.... Some have WD400AB and
    >>>>
    >>>>>>some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Tony
    >>>>>

    >
     
    Barry Watzman, Oct 25, 2003
    #9
  10. Tony

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>,
    wrote:

    > I have an attorney client of mine who had a quick power outtage. All

    computers came back up except
    > one. Of course, that one had some stuff that wasnt backed up (though

    they thought it was). I was
    > called in and I saw that the drive does not spin at all, so there is no

    power.
    >
    > It is a Western Digital WD400 HD. Should it work if I got an identical

    drive and replace the circuit
    > board on the drive? I would think it would. At the least, it should

    spin but there is no guarantee
    > that the data is still intact. But, first things first.
    >
    > I see that there are different versions of the same drive out there.

    ..... Some have WD400AB and
    > some are WD400BB. I need the AB one.
    >
    > Tony


    Yes, if you get the EXACT same controller card, it should spin up,
    providing the existing controller card is at fault...
     
    Ghost, Oct 28, 2003
    #10
  11. Tony

    FredG Guest

    Tony < > wrote in message news:<>...
    > snip


    No-one seems to have suggested that a data retrieval company take a
    look at this drive. Any reason why?

    If money were not a problem and the data was "must have", that'd be my
    first option.
     
    FredG, Oct 28, 2003
    #11
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