DDR vs. SD RAM

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by natural_4u, Feb 24, 2004.

  1. natural_4u

    natural_4u Guest

    Just on anyone's opinion, would you rather have 1 GB of SDRAM PC 133 or
    512MB of DDRAM PC266

    with a Pentium 4 2.4 b GHZ


    Thanks in advance for your opinions!!!
     
    natural_4u, Feb 24, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. It all depended upon whether I was going for speed or needed the most
    memory.

    --
    David Bland

    "natural_4u" <> wrote in message
    news:fdA_b.591110$JQ1.186211@pd7tw1no...
    > Just on anyone's opinion, would you rather have 1 GB of SDRAM PC 133 or
    > 512MB of DDRAM PC266
    >
    > with a Pentium 4 2.4 b GHZ
    >
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your opinions!!!
    >
    >
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 24, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. natural_4u

    RussS Guest

    DDR
     
    RussS, Feb 24, 2004
    #3
  4. Yes, i had one of those early systems that could handle both sd and ddr, i
    started out with sd, and upgraded to ddr eventually, i wasn't expecting any
    huge difference, but to my surprise the system sure ran a lot faster after
    the switch. I would definately recommend the DDR, 512 megs is good for most
    stuff, unless your running some memory intensive software, go with the ddr

    "natural_4u" <> wrote in message
    news:fdA_b.591110$JQ1.186211@pd7tw1no...
    > Just on anyone's opinion, would you rather have 1 GB of SDRAM PC 133 or
    > 512MB of DDRAM PC266
    >
    > with a Pentium 4 2.4 b GHZ
    >
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your opinions!!!
    >
    >
     
    Creative Door, Feb 24, 2004
    #4
  5. natural_4u

    AG Guest

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > You do not want SDRAM with any Pentium 4 under any circumstances. It
    > will cost you the equivalent of about 25% of the CPU speed (e.g. your
    > 2.4 GHz will perform more like 1.8 GHz).
    >
    > You either want DDR or RDRAM (Rambus; no longer being sold for new
    > desktop systems, but still used in some older motherboards and also in
    > some networking systems).
    >
    > Also, in most cases, any one motherboard will take one and only one type
    > of memory, for any given system, it's usually not a choice (there were a
    > FEW systems that could take both SDRAM and early DDR, however).


    Actually I have a board that takes both SDRAM and DDR. You can use only one
    at a time. I bought it because at the time I didn't have enough money for
    new RAM and still wanted to upgrade later.
    I don't remember what model I used. I've since broken the AGP slot on that
    board and gotten another but the link below is to a page that describes one
    that does take both.
    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=13-135-126&catalog=22&depa=1

    Personally I'd recommend the DDR because it runs so much faster.
    AG
     
    AG, Feb 24, 2004
    #5
  6. On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 07:51:38 GMT, "David BlandIII" <>
    wrote:

    >It all depended upon whether I was going for speed or needed the most
    >memory.


    I have rather limited needs myself as far as RAM goes. I am trying to
    imagine a (home) scenario where 512 M was not enough. I suspect that
    they must exist, but can anyone outline a specific scenario where the
    HDD is being paged when there is 512M of physical RAM, in other words,
    a scenario where 512M of physical RAM is insufficient to support the
    OS and running software (other than a server)? Thanks.

    Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Feb 24, 2004
    #6
  7. Tom,

    I have 512MB DDR installed in my PC and I frequently run into RAM problems.
    I sometimes keep my MBD's memory utility running so I can look at the RAM
    allocation dynamically and on many occasions I run into the "swap meet"
    blues.

    It all depends upon how many and what kinds of applications you run
    concurrently.
    I can easily get bogged down when opening several pages of my net browser
    while running my Music Match program and a multimedia app or two in the
    back-
    ground. Another problem that I frequently get that prompts me to plan to up
    my
    RAM to 1 GB is that I seem to have more than one problem with applications
    that fail to release their memory upon termination. Thus after closing one
    such app
    and launching another my system quickly turns into a vat of molasses. The
    extra
    memory will keep me from having to reboot as often.

    Lastly running concurrent programs that deal with video playback or
    streaming,
    image manipulation and or music will bring 512MB RAM to its knees very
    quickly.
    So it all depends on you usage habits. Just my two cents worth.

    --
    David Bland

    "Tom MacIntyre" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 07:51:38 GMT, "David BlandIII" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >It all depended upon whether I was going for speed or needed the most
    > >memory.

    >
    > I have rather limited needs myself as far as RAM goes. I am trying to
    > imagine a (home) scenario where 512 M was not enough. I suspect that
    > they must exist, but can anyone outline a specific scenario where the
    > HDD is being paged when there is 512M of physical RAM, in other words,
    > a scenario where 512M of physical RAM is insufficient to support the
    > OS and running software (other than a server)? Thanks.
    >
    > Tom
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 24, 2004
    #7
  8. natural_4u

    natural_4u Guest

    From what I've read, there is a lot of opinions on using both, meaning... it
    couldn't hurt with either opinions. I currently have 1 GB of SDRAM PC 133,
    so I'm gonna stick with this for now and when I have enough money to spare,
    I will upgrade to 1GB of DDR.

    Also, I do watch a lot of video and play a lot of music and have a TV
    tuner... so I guess the extra RAM will will come in handy.


    "natural_4u" <> wrote in message
    news:fdA_b.591110$JQ1.186211@pd7tw1no...
    > Just on anyone's opinion, would you rather have 1 GB of SDRAM PC 133 or
    > 512MB of DDRAM PC266
    >
    > with a Pentium 4 2.4 b GHZ
    >
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your opinions!!!
    >
    >
     
    natural_4u, Feb 24, 2004
    #8
  9. natural_4u

    RussS Guest

    Tom - Using Photoshop with big files does it every time. Most of my clients
    who do ad work using Photoshop like to run a Gig - more is possible.


    David - MusicMatch I stay away from - tends to hog memory and not release it
    cleanly (I think perhaps a combination issue, but only happened for me with
    MM).
    I have also noticed that some other MultiMedia apps are chronic for that
    exact same issue too.
     
    RussS, Feb 25, 2004
    #9
  10. natural_4u

    RussS Guest

    Hey dood

    You will find that 512 of DDR will totally cream 1 Gb of SD. However since
    it appears that you have one of the earlier MotherBoards I am not certain if
    you would get the full benefit of DDR, but the increase from 133 to 266
    would certainly not go astray.
     
    RussS, Feb 25, 2004
    #10
  11. On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 20:07:24 GMT, "David BlandIII" <>
    wrote:

    >Tom,
    >
    >I have 512MB DDR installed in my PC and I frequently run into RAM problems.
    >I sometimes keep my MBD's memory utility running so I can look at the RAM
    >allocation dynamically and on many occasions I run into the "swap meet"
    >blues.
    >
    >It all depends upon how many and what kinds of applications you run
    >concurrently.
    >I can easily get bogged down when opening several pages of my net browser
    >while running my Music Match program and a multimedia app or two in the
    >back-
    >ground. Another problem that I frequently get that prompts me to plan to up
    >my
    >RAM to 1 GB is that I seem to have more than one problem with applications
    >that fail to release their memory upon termination. Thus after closing one
    >such app
    >and launching another my system quickly turns into a vat of molasses. The
    >extra
    >memory will keep me from having to reboot as often.
    >
    >Lastly running concurrent programs that deal with video playback or
    >streaming,
    >image manipulation and or music will bring 512MB RAM to its knees very
    >quickly.
    >So it all depends on you usage habits. Just my two cents worth.


    What OS? Is it RAM problems, or resource problems?

    I only have 160M of RAM running W2k, and I have about 60M free with 13
    applications running (Office stuff, several browsers, a few small
    games).
    Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Feb 25, 2004
    #11
  12. Barry,

    I haven't had the chance to study up on RAM as in depth as I'd like, but do
    you think
    that is the problem with being able to add much more than 1GB of DDR to a
    system?
    I'm getting kind of tired of seeing MB companies pitch the fact that their
    motherboards
    can use up to 3 or 4 GB of RAM only to find out time and time again from the
    memory
    mfgs that sticks of 1GB or larger are unstable or can't be utilized in
    Dual-channel mode
    or aren't recommended at all for more than 2 sticks, etc. Damn it, I want by
    2 Gigs;
    and I want it in two sticks so I can up it to 3 or 4 if I want! :)

    --
    David Bland


    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > DDR memory is not particularly stable. The timing and noise margins are
    > poor, and reliability decreases significantly if there are multiple
    > modules installed. The BIOS on many motherboards actually slows down
    > the memory timing (automatically) to regain reliability when multiple
    > modules are used. RDRAM (Rambus) was (is) a FAR better memory type, but
    > unfortunately, for political reasons and due to collusion among memory
    > makers, it did not become the prevailing desktop memory type.
    >
    > Almost all of the negative views of Rambus (both the company and the
    > memory) were lies spread by it's opponents. If you want to begin to
    > really understand what happened, the opinion by the judge in the FTC
    > case, just released yesterday, is fascinating reading. It can be found
    > on the FTC web site:
    >
    > http://www.ftc.gov/os/adjpro/d9302/040223initialdecision.pdf
    >
    > This document is not for the timid, it's a single-spaced, 340 page, 19
    > megabyte file that covers the whole ungodly mess in excruciating detail
    > (but it's VERY well written). It's the result of a 3-year investigation
    > and trial that ended up being the longest administrative law case in
    > FTC history. The parties’ post trial briefs totaled 443 pages, there
    > were 4,879 proposed findings of fact, 11,806 pages of transcript and
    > 2,200 admitted exhibits. Again, if you have a negative opinion of
    > Rambus (either the company OR the memory), almost everything that you
    > think that you knew was a lie.
    >
    >
    > David BlandIII wrote:
    >
    > > Tom,
    > >
    > > I have 512MB DDR installed in my PC and I frequently run into RAM

    problems.
    > > I sometimes keep my MBD's memory utility running so I can look at the

    RAM
    > > allocation dynamically and on many occasions I run into the "swap meet"
    > > blues.
    > >
    > > It all depends upon how many and what kinds of applications you run
    > > concurrently.
    > > I can easily get bogged down when opening several pages of my net

    browser
    > > while running my Music Match program and a multimedia app or two in the
    > > back-
    > > ground. Another problem that I frequently get that prompts me to plan to

    up
    > > my
    > > RAM to 1 GB is that I seem to have more than one problem with

    applications
    > > that fail to release their memory upon termination. Thus after closing

    one
    > > such app
    > > and launching another my system quickly turns into a vat of molasses.

    The
    > > extra
    > > memory will keep me from having to reboot as often.
    > >
    > > Lastly running concurrent programs that deal with video playback or
    > > streaming,
    > > image manipulation and or music will bring 512MB RAM to its knees very
    > > quickly.
    > > So it all depends on you usage habits. Just my two cents worth.
    > >

    >
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 25, 2004
    #12
  13. It's both. While you can't get around the old resource issue you can
    alleviate the
    swap meet issue with more RAM. Like I said, I frequently watch as my RAM
    reaches it's limit on the ol' RAM-o-meter!

    --
    David Bland

    "Tom MacIntyre" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 20:07:24 GMT, "David BlandIII" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Tom,
    > >
    > >I have 512MB DDR installed in my PC and I frequently run into RAM

    problems.
    > >I sometimes keep my MBD's memory utility running so I can look at the RAM
    > >allocation dynamically and on many occasions I run into the "swap meet"
    > >blues.
    > >
    > >It all depends upon how many and what kinds of applications you run
    > >concurrently.
    > >I can easily get bogged down when opening several pages of my net browser
    > >while running my Music Match program and a multimedia app or two in the
    > >back-
    > >ground. Another problem that I frequently get that prompts me to plan to

    up
    > >my
    > >RAM to 1 GB is that I seem to have more than one problem with

    applications
    > >that fail to release their memory upon termination. Thus after closing

    one
    > >such app
    > >and launching another my system quickly turns into a vat of molasses. The
    > >extra
    > >memory will keep me from having to reboot as often.
    > >
    > >Lastly running concurrent programs that deal with video playback or
    > >streaming,
    > >image manipulation and or music will bring 512MB RAM to its knees very
    > >quickly.
    > >So it all depends on you usage habits. Just my two cents worth.

    >
    > What OS? Is it RAM problems, or resource problems?
    >
    > I only have 160M of RAM running W2k, and I have about 60M free with 13
    > applications running (Office stuff, several browsers, a few small
    > games).
    > Tom
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 25, 2004
    #13
  14. Barry,

    You must be psychic because that's precisely the MB/memory combination I was
    looking at. Unfortunately after talking to the tech at ASUS he said that the
    P4C800E
    hadn't been certified for more than two sticks of even their 512MB PC3200
    RAM.
    And even with that memory, it wasn't recommended for use in dual channel
    mode;
    I think.

    On the bright side, the tech at Mushkin did say that their new dual pack of
    level II
    DDR400 memory (#103-956) (512MB sticks) would work with the P4C800E in
    dual channel mode but then I still couldn't get past 2 Gigs. Those dual
    packs also
    cost $340 a pop ($680 for 2GB RAM and I still can't get more than the 2 Gigs
    :)

    Do you know of any high-end Mobos that use RDRAM??

    --
    David Bland

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > At some level, you are correct. The stability of DDR decreases
    > significantly as modules are added; and to a much lesser degree, it also
    > decreases on a single module as the module has more and more chips on it
    > (which is required for larger module sizes). The issues are noise on
    > the memory bus, crosstalk, jitter (or timing stability) and
    > "transmission line" type problems. It's quite possible you can't, in
    > practice, actually reach the "theoretical maximum" memory configuration.
    > The particular brand of memory module also becomes a factor, you may
    > find brands or combinations of brands that work, and others that don't
    > work. Getting to 1 gig is easy, but getting to two gigs is more
    > difficult. RDRAM, which uses a terminated, impedance controlled serial
    > bus, is MUCH more stable than DDR, but it's more expensive, and none of
    > the RDRAM systems will support an 800 MHz FSB CPU as there is no RDRAM
    > chipset currently made with such support.
    >
    > My suggestion would be an Asus P4C800-E Deluxe with 4 DDR 3200 modules
    > of 512 megs each (probably the best way to go), or for RDRAM an Asus
    > P4T533-C with four 512 meg PC1066 RDRAM modules.
    >
    >
    > David BlandIII wrote:
    > > Barry,
    > >
    > > I haven't had the chance to study up on RAM as in depth as I'd like, but

    do
    > > you think
    > > that is the problem with being able to add much more than 1GB of DDR to

    a
    > > system?
    > > I'm getting kind of tired of seeing MB companies pitch the fact that

    their
    > > motherboards
    > > can use up to 3 or 4 GB of RAM only to find out time and time again from

    the
    > > memory
    > > mfgs that sticks of 1GB or larger are unstable or can't be utilized in
    > > Dual-channel mode
    > > or aren't recommended at all for more than 2 sticks, etc. Damn it, I

    want by
    > > 2 Gigs;
    > > and I want it in two sticks so I can up it to 3 or 4 if I want! :)
    > >

    >
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 26, 2004
    #14
  15. What kind of work do you do Barry? You seem to be up on your tech specs a
    bunch.

    --
    David Bland

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:ptq%b.34993$...
    > I believe that you are referring to the Gigabyte GA8-IHXP (or was it
    > IXHP -- something like that). It was the other leading high-end
    > motherboard using 16-bit RDRAM. Gigabyte used the 850e chipset with the
    > ICH4 controller hub on that board, a combination that Intel did not
    > recommend or support, because there is a slight voltage mis-match
    > between the I/O lines of the two chips. SOME users reported a variety
    > of odd probems with that board, many of them involving the serial ports,
    > and consequently I never recommended it.
    >
    > Actually my favorite motherboard of all time -- the one I still prefer
    > to use in new builds even today -- is the Asus P4T533 (no suffix, it's
    > totally different from the P4T533-C). This was Asus last RDRAM
    > motherboard and it uses 32 bit RDRAM (RIMM4200 with 232-pin sockets)
    > rather than the far more common 16-bit RDRAM (184-pin sockets). It is
    > truly a wonderful motherboard, and I have 5 of them here. However,
    > there are two "gotchas" with this board: First, some of the early ones
    > have a problem in the CPU Vcore power supply and are unstable (this
    > problem was fixed in later production and you can RMA the early boards
    > to Asus for rework). Second, it only has two memory sockets, and as far
    > as I know one gig is the upper memory limit, which rules it out for this
    > thread since the whole thread was about getting to 2 gigs reliably.
    >
    >
    > SBFan2000 wrote:
    >
    > > I don't know if you would consider it high-end since it is over 1 year

    old
    > > but I used a Gigabyte P4Titan533 (can't remember exact model #) with

    PC1066
    > > ECC RDRAM and the thing has been solid as a rock. I did this back in

    March
    > > 2003 so I'm sure they have more advanced models but I'm still very happy
    > > with this system! Asus lied to me, twice about a Athlon thunderbird

    board
    > > and that left a bad impression on me. I specifically went to Gigabyte

    for
    > > that reason. I don't trust anything asus says anymore!
    > >
    > > "David BlandIII" <> wrote in message
    > > news:5Eg%b.8261$...
    > >
    > >>Barry,
    > >>
    > >>You must be psychic because that's precisely the MB/memory combination I

    > >
    > > was
    > >
    > >>looking at. Unfortunately after talking to the tech at ASUS he said that

    > >
    > > the
    > >
    > >>P4C800E
    > >>hadn't been certified for more than two sticks of even their 512MB

    PC3200
    > >>RAM.
    > >>And even with that memory, it wasn't recommended for use in dual channel
    > >>mode;
    > >>I think.
    > >>
    > >>On the bright side, the tech at Mushkin did say that their new dual pack

    > >
    > > of
    > >
    > >>level II
    > >>DDR400 memory (#103-956) (512MB sticks) would work with the P4C800E in
    > >>dual channel mode but then I still couldn't get past 2 Gigs. Those dual
    > >>packs also
    > >>cost $340 a pop ($680 for 2GB RAM and I still can't get more than the 2

    > >
    > > Gigs
    > >
    > >>:)
    > >>
    > >>Do you know of any high-end Mobos that use RDRAM??
    > >>
    > >>--
    > >>David Bland
    > >>
    > >>"Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    > >>news:...
    > >>
    > >>>At some level, you are correct. The stability of DDR decreases
    > >>>significantly as modules are added; and to a much lesser degree, it

    also
    > >>>decreases on a single module as the module has more and more chips on

    it
    > >>>(which is required for larger module sizes). The issues are noise on
    > >>>the memory bus, crosstalk, jitter (or timing stability) and
    > >>>"transmission line" type problems. It's quite possible you can't, in
    > >>>practice, actually reach the "theoretical maximum" memory

    configuration.
    > >>> The particular brand of memory module also becomes a factor, you may
    > >>>find brands or combinations of brands that work, and others that don't
    > >>>work. Getting to 1 gig is easy, but getting to two gigs is more
    > >>>difficult. RDRAM, which uses a terminated, impedance controlled serial
    > >>>bus, is MUCH more stable than DDR, but it's more expensive, and none of
    > >>>the RDRAM systems will support an 800 MHz FSB CPU as there is no RDRAM
    > >>>chipset currently made with such support.
    > >>>
    > >>>My suggestion would be an Asus P4C800-E Deluxe with 4 DDR 3200 modules
    > >>>of 512 megs each (probably the best way to go), or for RDRAM an Asus
    > >>>P4T533-C with four 512 meg PC1066 RDRAM modules.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>David BlandIII wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>>Barry,
    > >>>>
    > >>>>I haven't had the chance to study up on RAM as in depth as I'd like,

    > >
    > > but
    > >
    > >>do
    > >>
    > >>>>you think
    > >>>>that is the problem with being able to add much more than 1GB of DDR

    > >
    > > to
    > >
    > >>a
    > >>
    > >>>>system?
    > >>>>I'm getting kind of tired of seeing MB companies pitch the fact that
    > >>
    > >>their
    > >>
    > >>>>motherboards
    > >>>>can use up to 3 or 4 GB of RAM only to find out time and time again

    > >
    > > from
    > >
    > >>the
    > >>
    > >>>>memory
    > >>>>mfgs that sticks of 1GB or larger are unstable or can't be utilized in
    > >>>>Dual-channel mode
    > >>>>or aren't recommended at all for more than 2 sticks, etc. Damn it, I
    > >>
    > >>want by
    > >>
    > >>>>2 Gigs;
    > >>>>and I want it in two sticks so I can up it to 3 or 4 if I want! :)
    > >>>>
    > >>>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 26, 2004
    #15
  16. Thanks for the advice. I'll go an check it out now. I always did like those
    Gigabyte boards.

    --
    David Bland

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If you wanted to go with RDRAM, the best choice would be an Asus
    > P4T533-C. It's a totally solid motherboard, but I don't believe that
    > it's still in new production. But you can find lots of them on E-Bay,
    > they usually go for about $50 to $70 (you can probably find some "new"
    > ones in stock somewhere for about twice that much).
    >
    > The big drawback is that it doesn't support any 800 MHz FSB CPUs; the
    > best CPU for this is the 3.06 GHz 533 MHz bus P4, which does have
    > hyperthreading. The board also has USB 2, as well as onboard audio and
    > LAN (these can be disabled if desired). You will need four 512 meg
    > PC1066 184-pin 16-bit RDRAM modules, which will be very expensive. But
    > it will get you to 2 gigs reliably.
    >
    >
    > David BlandIII wrote:
    > > Barry,
    > >
    > > You must be psychic because that's precisely the MB/memory combination I

    was
    > > looking at. Unfortunately after talking to the tech at ASUS he said that

    the
    > > P4C800E
    > > hadn't been certified for more than two sticks of even their 512MB

    PC3200
    > > RAM.
    > > And even with that memory, it wasn't recommended for use in dual channel
    > > mode;
    > > I think.
    > >
    > > On the bright side, the tech at Mushkin did say that their new dual pack

    of
    > > level II
    > > DDR400 memory (#103-956) (512MB sticks) would work with the P4C800E in
    > > dual channel mode but then I still couldn't get past 2 Gigs. Those dual
    > > packs also
    > > cost $340 a pop ($680 for 2GB RAM and I still can't get more than the 2

    Gigs
    > > :)
    > >
    > > Do you know of any high-end Mobos that use RDRAM??
    > >

    >
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 26, 2004
    #16
  17. LOL, I meant ASUS. What would Freud say about that?

    --
    David Bland

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If you wanted to go with RDRAM, the best choice would be an Asus
    > P4T533-C. It's a totally solid motherboard, but I don't believe that
    > it's still in new production. But you can find lots of them on E-Bay,
    > they usually go for about $50 to $70 (you can probably find some "new"
    > ones in stock somewhere for about twice that much).
    >
    > The big drawback is that it doesn't support any 800 MHz FSB CPUs; the
    > best CPU for this is the 3.06 GHz 533 MHz bus P4, which does have
    > hyperthreading. The board also has USB 2, as well as onboard audio and
    > LAN (these can be disabled if desired). You will need four 512 meg
    > PC1066 184-pin 16-bit RDRAM modules, which will be very expensive. But
    > it will get you to 2 gigs reliably.
    >
    >
    > David BlandIII wrote:
    > > Barry,
    > >
    > > You must be psychic because that's precisely the MB/memory combination I

    was
    > > looking at. Unfortunately after talking to the tech at ASUS he said that

    the
    > > P4C800E
    > > hadn't been certified for more than two sticks of even their 512MB

    PC3200
    > > RAM.
    > > And even with that memory, it wasn't recommended for use in dual channel
    > > mode;
    > > I think.
    > >
    > > On the bright side, the tech at Mushkin did say that their new dual pack

    of
    > > level II
    > > DDR400 memory (#103-956) (512MB sticks) would work with the P4C800E in
    > > dual channel mode but then I still couldn't get past 2 Gigs. Those dual
    > > packs also
    > > cost $340 a pop ($680 for 2GB RAM and I still can't get more than the 2

    Gigs
    > > :)
    > >
    > > Do you know of any high-end Mobos that use RDRAM??
    > >

    >
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 26, 2004
    #17
  18. I found some on PriceGrabber.com for $113 but Jesus H - $250 to $300 for
    512MB
    of RDRAM!!!!!! No wonder people are shouting conspiracy! :)

    --
    David Bland

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If you wanted to go with RDRAM, the best choice would be an Asus
    > P4T533-C. It's a totally solid motherboard, but I don't believe that
    > it's still in new production. But you can find lots of them on E-Bay,
    > they usually go for about $50 to $70 (you can probably find some "new"
    > ones in stock somewhere for about twice that much).
    >
    > The big drawback is that it doesn't support any 800 MHz FSB CPUs; the
    > best CPU for this is the 3.06 GHz 533 MHz bus P4, which does have
    > hyperthreading. The board also has USB 2, as well as onboard audio and
    > LAN (these can be disabled if desired). You will need four 512 meg
    > PC1066 184-pin 16-bit RDRAM modules, which will be very expensive. But
    > it will get you to 2 gigs reliably.
    >
    >
    > David BlandIII wrote:
    > > Barry,
    > >
    > > You must be psychic because that's precisely the MB/memory combination I

    was
    > > looking at. Unfortunately after talking to the tech at ASUS he said that

    the
    > > P4C800E
    > > hadn't been certified for more than two sticks of even their 512MB

    PC3200
    > > RAM.
    > > And even with that memory, it wasn't recommended for use in dual channel
    > > mode;
    > > I think.
    > >
    > > On the bright side, the tech at Mushkin did say that their new dual pack

    of
    > > level II
    > > DDR400 memory (#103-956) (512MB sticks) would work with the P4C800E in
    > > dual channel mode but then I still couldn't get past 2 Gigs. Those dual
    > > packs also
    > > cost $340 a pop ($680 for 2GB RAM and I still can't get more than the 2

    Gigs
    > > :)
    > >
    > > Do you know of any high-end Mobos that use RDRAM??
    > >

    >
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 26, 2004
    #18
  19. So you're basically just winging it. :)

    --
    David Bland

    Now what chance do I stand to get a job?????? :-(

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > At the moment I'm unemployed.
    >
    > I am an EE with an MBA, I've been a product manager for technology
    > products for several decades, including PCs with some of the major PC
    > makers. I have about a dozen patents and copyrights, and I'm A+ &
    > Network+ certified.
    >
    >
    > David BlandIII wrote:
    > > What kind of work do you do Barry? You seem to be up on your tech specs

    a
    > > bunch.
    > >

    >
     
    David BlandIII, Feb 27, 2004
    #19
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