ddr memory speed and mainboard question

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by paul gregory, Sep 30, 2005.

  1. paul gregory

    paul gregory Guest

    Hi everyone,
    I just upgraded my computer using an ecs mainboard with 800 mhz frontside
    bus and pentium 4 2.66 Ghz processor. Yay for me, works lovely.
    Heres a funny question though. I've not stayed up to date with computer
    tech speks, so this is gonna sound stupid to a lot of you. sorry bout that.
    The docs for my computer say my board supports ddr sdram running at 266,
    333, and 400 mhz. I forget all the pc2700, pc2100, or pcWhatever numbers,
    cause it don't matter, the speed rating is on the ram when ya buy it.
    Anyway, on a hunch, (and a lean wallet), I installed my ddr sdram running
    at 133 mhz, and it works fine, but seems a bit slow. (DUHHHHH) yes, i know,
    i know.
    Anyway, if I understand ddr sdram correctly, that should mean Im pushing
    data on my system at 266 mhz, (133 up, 133 down). And it should also mean,
    to me, that if I upgrade my ddr sdram to 400 mhz, I'll be using the full
    support of my boards features, and will be pushing data at 800 mhz, based on
    the same principles, which will let my drives and all else communicate and
    work faster with the cpu and memory.
    Then the second question is, will it have any impact on my video, which is
    an agp video card, which, if I understand correctly, communicates directly
    with the cpu through the agp port.

    Am I stupid, or did I get any of this right? Thanks, have fun with this
    one.
    Paul Gregory
    paul gregory, Sep 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. paul gregory

    derek / nul Guest

    On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 20:35:19 GMT, "paul gregory" <>
    wrote:

    >Hi everyone,
    > I just upgraded my computer using an ecs mainboard with 800 mhz frontside
    >bus and pentium 4 2.66 Ghz processor. Yay for me, works lovely.
    > Heres a funny question though. I've not stayed up to date with computer
    >tech speks, so this is gonna sound stupid to a lot of you. sorry bout that.
    > The docs for my computer say my board supports ddr sdram running at 266,
    >333, and 400 mhz. I forget all the pc2700, pc2100, or pcWhatever numbers,
    >cause it don't matter, the speed rating is on the ram when ya buy it.
    > Anyway, on a hunch, (and a lean wallet), I installed my ddr sdram running
    >at 133 mhz, and it works fine, but seems a bit slow. (DUHHHHH) yes, i know,
    >i know.
    > Anyway, if I understand ddr sdram correctly, that should mean Im pushing
    >data on my system at 266 mhz, (133 up, 133 down).


    No, memory accesses are on each transition of the clock pulses.

    > And it should also mean,
    >to me, that if I upgrade my ddr sdram to 400 mhz, I'll be using the full
    >support of my boards features, and will be pushing data at 800 mhz, based on
    >the same principles, which will let my drives and all else communicate and
    >work faster with the cpu and memory.


    Not quite

    > Then the second question is, will it have any impact on my video, which is
    >an agp video card, which, if I understand correctly, communicates directly
    >with the cpu through the agp port.


    The video card talks directly to memory, not the cpu.
    derek / nul, Sep 30, 2005
    #2
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  3. paul gregory

    paul gregory Guest

    Me again.
    thanks for your reply derek. Since I was delving into this area for the
    first time, I had much to learn,
    This was just a part of my learning process. Here's what the final answer
    ended up being.
    Yes, I did need a ram upgrade, taken care of. Bought some ddr400.
    easy fix. My next boot, checking with CPU-Z, showed me running FSB at 533 !
    Great, but still not 800 MHZ.
    Another newsreader answered to make sure cpu supported 800 mhz fsb. I
    replied that I was just sure it did, because the specs for the board/cpu
    combo stated 800/533 fsb. no problem. Or was there?
    after checking with the motherboard manufacturer tech support people, it
    turned out the motherboard does support 800 MHz fsb.
    Good deal. Next stop, Intels website. checked specs for P4 506@2.66
    GHz. AHA. CPU supports 533 MHz fsb only, not 800.
    And there it is. I got the combo at fry's electronics for 130 bucks. The
    800/533 fsb support refers to the motherboard/cpu support, not as a whole,
    but seperately. Yes I was a little upset at the advertising snafu, but
    technically, they are correct. I should have dug a little deeper BEFORE
    buying.
    Bottom line is my system is much faster, it was an economical upgrade,
    and next time I know what I'm looking for. Thanks for your answers.
    Paul

    "derek / nul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 20:35:19 GMT, "paul gregory"

    <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Hi everyone,
    > > I just upgraded my computer using an ecs mainboard with 800 mhz

    frontside
    > >bus and pentium 4 2.66 Ghz processor. Yay for me, works lovely.
    > > Heres a funny question though. I've not stayed up to date with computer
    > >tech speks, so this is gonna sound stupid to a lot of you. sorry bout

    that.
    > > The docs for my computer say my board supports ddr sdram running at

    266,
    > >333, and 400 mhz. I forget all the pc2700, pc2100, or pcWhatever numbers,
    > >cause it don't matter, the speed rating is on the ram when ya buy it.
    > > Anyway, on a hunch, (and a lean wallet), I installed my ddr sdram

    running
    > >at 133 mhz, and it works fine, but seems a bit slow. (DUHHHHH) yes, i

    know,
    > >i know.
    > > Anyway, if I understand ddr sdram correctly, that should mean Im

    pushing
    > >data on my system at 266 mhz, (133 up, 133 down).

    >
    > No, memory accesses are on each transition of the clock pulses.
    >
    > > And it should also mean,
    > >to me, that if I upgrade my ddr sdram to 400 mhz, I'll be using the full
    > >support of my boards features, and will be pushing data at 800 mhz, based

    on
    > >the same principles, which will let my drives and all else communicate

    and
    > >work faster with the cpu and memory.

    >
    > Not quite
    >
    > > Then the second question is, will it have any impact on my video, which

    is
    > >an agp video card, which, if I understand correctly, communicates

    directly
    > >with the cpu through the agp port.

    >
    > The video card talks directly to memory, not the cpu.
    paul gregory, Oct 15, 2005
    #3
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