Dave

Discussion in 'MCSA' started by Acceptable to have the MCSA standale?, Jan 28, 2004.

  1. Hi everyone,

    Just wondering, do the majority of you have the MCSA with a degree of some kind? I am thinking about studying for the MCSA and Cisco's CCNA course (currently studying) after my A levels

    Thanks

    Dave
    Acceptable to have the MCSA standale?, Jan 28, 2004
    #1
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  2. Acceptable to have the MCSA standale?

    kpg Guest

    > Just wondering, do the majority of you have the MCSA with a degree of some
    kind? I am thinking about studying for the MCSA and Cisco's CCNA course
    (currently studying) after my A levels

    A degree is by no means a necessity, but I believe a degree (either
    Associate
    or full) makes you more employable. I have a 4-year degree in computer
    science
    but the major you choose is not as important as just having the sheep-skin.
    Aside
    from demonstrating to the employer that you can stick-it-out when it gets
    tough it
    also provides some assurance that you can read, write, and communicate
    (skills not
    possessed by all US high school graduates). Well roundedness is always
    desirable.
    kpg, Jan 29, 2004
    #2
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  3. Acceptable to have the MCSA standale?

    James Martin Guest

    Hey Dave, kpg's got it right, it's all about the sheep skin (for those not
    in the know, degrees were traditionally printed on this). A certification
    has a built in expiration due to the ever evolving technology. A MCSE by
    itself has a shelf life of 5-10 years. For instance, someone with a NT MCSE
    is reaching the end of that life cycle, although some places will continue
    to use NT for years to come. (Last year I was working on a project for a
    top 3 US bank and I kid you not, they had an ancient IBM server still in use
    that had a 8 inch floppy drive). A degree will last you a lifetime, and is
    not as focused as you might think. For instance, kpg's CS degree says a lot
    beyond his ability to program. A CS degree from a reputable school carries
    with it extensive mathmatics that apply to many engineering fields.
    Theoretically, refocussing from CS to another field like EE would not be
    that difficult.

    To go beyond just being a "network administrator" or "network engineer" into
    management you will need to have a degree. Those particular fields are
    islands of opportunity that are 1) shrinking and 2) have limited growth
    potential (glass ceiling). I studied Management with a specialization in IT
    and a minor in International Affairs. My focus has been on how an
    organization (small to multinational) effectively uses IT. This involves
    much more than those limited areas, including accounting, finance, and most
    of all--working with people.

    Well roundedness is much more valuable than a specialty in one product or
    company. You've got the right idea getting the A+, MCSA and CCNA. Consider
    throwing a linux cert in there as you will see that OS take off more than it
    already has once SCO fails in their lawsuit. Very few people are certified
    in that while the MCSE pool is extremely saturated.

    "kpg" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > Just wondering, do the majority of you have the MCSA with a degree of

    some
    > kind? I am thinking about studying for the MCSA and Cisco's CCNA course
    > (currently studying) after my A levels
    >
    > A degree is by no means a necessity, but I believe a degree (either
    > Associate
    > or full) makes you more employable. I have a 4-year degree in computer
    > science
    > but the major you choose is not as important as just having the

    sheep-skin.
    > Aside
    > from demonstrating to the employer that you can stick-it-out when it gets
    > tough it
    > also provides some assurance that you can read, write, and communicate
    > (skills not
    > possessed by all US high school graduates). Well roundedness is always
    > desirable.
    >
    >
    James Martin, Jan 29, 2004
    #3
  4. Acceptable to have the MCSA standale?

    tasha Guest

    Hi Dave, i don't know exact figures but having a degree is
    far from essential, although certainly not a bad idea! If
    you are interested in industry specific courses though
    then you need to think about whether you are more
    interested in Wide Area Networks (Cisco) or Local Area
    Networks (Microsoft) as these are the two main routes to
    consider. if you would like more information on courses
    then please visit our web site affordabletraining.co.uk

    tasha training advisor
    >-----Original Message-----
    >Hi everyone,
    >
    >Just wondering, do the majority of you have the MCSA with

    a degree of some kind? I am thinking about studying for
    the MCSA and Cisco's CCNA course (currently studying)
    after my A levels
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >Dave
    >.
    >
    tasha, Jan 29, 2004
    #4
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