Data transfer - Apple IIe to Windows ME.

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by wendell taylor, Nov 1, 2003.

  1. Like Bill, I have been trying to transfer all my spreadsheets, databases &
    accounting from my old Apple IIe (1985) to my Windows ME so I don't have to
    develope them all over again. Keeps saying Do I want to format the 5-1/4"
    disk?
    Then says "- can't be read so can't format" or something. It may impossible
    to transfer from one platform to another but any help or confirmation of
    this would be appreciated.
    Thanks, Wendell.
     
    wendell taylor, Nov 1, 2003
    #1
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  2. wendell taylor

    °Mike° Guest

    http://www.callapple.org/cat/Software.htm

    Scroll down to:

    The Apple to PC Transfer Kit ($99.95)

    "This volume includes all of the software in Freeware Volumes 1
    through 3 as well as the Emulators Volume 1 with a very nicely
    done manual on how to transfer your software to and from the
    Apple IIe. It also includes the ADT 1.22 freeware software on
    floppy disk for your Apple IIe or IIgs System. All Cables included!
    This kit gets you going within minutes. Don’t miss it as supplies
    are limited."


    On Fri, 31 Oct 2003 16:10:25 -0800, in
    <>
    wendell taylor scrawled:

    >Like Bill, I have been trying to transfer all my spreadsheets, databases &
    >accounting from my old Apple IIe (1985) to my Windows ME so I don't have to
    >develope them all over again. Keeps saying Do I want to format the 5-1/4"
    >disk?
    >Then says "- can't be read so can't format" or something. It may impossible
    >to transfer from one platform to another but any help or confirmation of
    >this would be appreciated.
    >Thanks, Wendell.
    >


    --
    Basic computer maintenance
    http://uk.geocities.com/personel44/maintenance.html
     
    °Mike°, Nov 1, 2003
    #2
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  3. wendell taylor

    PC Guest

    "wendell taylor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Like Bill, I have been trying to transfer all my spreadsheets, databases &
    > accounting from my old Apple IIe (1985) to my Windows ME so I don't have

    to
    > develope them all over again. Keeps saying Do I want to format the 5-1/4"
    > disk?
    > Then says "- can't be read so can't format" or something. It may

    impossible
    > to transfer from one platform to another but any help or confirmation of
    > this would be appreciated.
    > Thanks, Wendell.


    Hi Wendell

    If I remember correctly Apple disk drives wrote their data in one long
    spiral somewhat like a vinyl record track. i.e. start at the outside and
    slowly track the head inwards at a constant rate.
    IBM drives on the other hand wrote data in descrete rings, the heads
    stepping from track to track as required.

    I would think the only drives that will 'read' your old Apple II disks will
    be genuine Apple drives or their clones (Franklin?).

    One option is to find someone with a IIe and see if they can transfer the
    data via serial port.
    Then of course you will have to hope you can find a Dos/Windows program that
    can understand the orignal data and convert it.

    In the end I would think it would be quicker to view the data on a IIe in
    its native environment and take sufficient notes to enable you to rebuild
    your Sheets / Databases in a Windows application.

    Paul
     
    PC, Nov 1, 2003
    #3
  4. wendell taylor

    fkasner Guest

    PC wrote:
    > "wendell taylor" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Like Bill, I have been trying to transfer all my spreadsheets, databases &
    >>accounting from my old Apple IIe (1985) to my Windows ME so I don't have

    >
    > to
    >
    >>develope them all over again. Keeps saying Do I want to format the 5-1/4"
    >>disk?
    >>Then says "- can't be read so can't format" or something. It may

    >
    > impossible
    >
    >>to transfer from one platform to another but any help or confirmation of
    >>this would be appreciated.
    >>Thanks, Wendell.

    >
    >
    > Hi Wendell
    >
    > If I remember correctly Apple disk drives wrote their data in one long
    > spiral somewhat like a vinyl record track. i.e. start at the outside and
    > slowly track the head inwards at a constant rate.
    > IBM drives on the other hand wrote data in descrete rings, the heads
    > stepping from track to track as required.
    >
    > I would think the only drives that will 'read' your old Apple II disks will
    > be genuine Apple drives or their clones (Franklin?).
    >
    > One option is to find someone with a IIe and see if they can transfer the
    > data via serial port.
    > Then of course you will have to hope you can find a Dos/Windows program that
    > can understand the orignal data and convert it.
    >
    > In the end I would think it would be quicker to view the data on a IIe in
    > its native environment and take sufficient notes to enable you to rebuild
    > your Sheets / Databases in a Windows application.
    >
    > Paul
    >
    >


    I went through that some time ago. I was keeping records in visicalc and
    then later when I put a Z80 card in my Apple ][+ I kept the data in
    dBase II. Later when I went to an IBM type machine I transferred the
    dBase II data via serial port to the IBM. Then cleaned it up in dBase II
    for the IBM. Then switched it to dBase III and then finally into FoxBase
    and then FoxPro (DOS version.) Never found it necessary to go to a
    graphics operation on my Me computer. Note the output from many files
    can be in comma delimited type so if you set up the accepting software
    it can read the comma delimited data into a the necessary named parts of
    the software and format it properly. I do believe I have around here
    some Apple }{+ software that will convert Apple files to IBM type files.
    If this is the main obstacle you can get in touch with me and I'll do
    a search for that software. . BTW be careful how
    you send such messages, my email reader is set up to aggressively
    eradicate spam. Net effect is that if the message can be evaluated as
    spam out it goes.
    FK
     
    fkasner, Nov 1, 2003
    #4
  5. wendell taylor wrote:

    > Like Bill, I have been trying to transfer all my spreadsheets, databases &
    > accounting from my old Apple IIe (1985) to my Windows ME so I don't have
    > to develope them all over again. Keeps saying Do I want to format the
    > 5-1/4" disk?
    > Then says "- can't be read so can't format" or something. It may
    > impossible to transfer from one platform to another but any help or
    > confirmation of this would be appreciated.
    > Thanks, Wendell.
    >
    >

    Can the IIe get onto the Net? (Through external modem, for example)
    If so, park the files from the IIe onto a web page and retrieve them with
    the ME machine.

    Can the IIe talk through a serial port and can you get software to do that?
    If so, connect the two machines with a null modem serial cable and transfer
    the data that way.
    It may also be possible to use a parallel port connection if you can get the
    IIe software for it.
    --
    Gary G. Taylor * Rialto, CA
    gary at donavan dot org / http:// geetee dot donavan dot org
    "The two most abundant things in the universe
    are hydrogen and stupidity." --Harlan Ellison
     
    Gary G. Taylor, Nov 1, 2003
    #5
  6. Howdy!

    "PC" <> wrote in message
    news:2eDob.4124$...
    >


    > If I remember correctly Apple disk drives wrote their data in one long
    > spiral somewhat like a vinyl record track. i.e. start at the outside and
    > slowly track the head inwards at a constant rate.


    Err - Not on the floppies.

    What they DID do was use GCR (Group Code Recording), not MFM
    (Modified Frequency Modulation) for the signal.

    > IBM drives on the other hand wrote data in descrete rings, the heads
    > stepping from track to track as required.


    And the same PHYSICAL drive would work on both, with the appropriate
    electronics on the drive (which was different ...)

    >
    > I would think the only drives that will 'read' your old Apple II disks

    will
    > be genuine Apple drives or their clones (Franklin?).


    This is true of the 5.25" drives. There were adapters to allow you
    to read an Apple // 800K 3.5" drive on a PC, though.

    >
    > One option is to find someone with a IIe and see if they can transfer the
    > data via serial port.
    > Then of course you will have to hope you can find a Dos/Windows program

    that
    > can understand the orignal data and convert it.
    >
    > In the end I would think it would be quicker to view the data on a IIe in
    > its native environment and take sufficient notes to enable you to rebuild
    > your Sheets / Databases in a Windows application.


    RwP
     
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Nov 1, 2003
    #6
  7. wendell taylor

    Computer Guy Guest

    Hello.
    You could try it with networking or possibly PCAnywhere. PcAnywhere would be
    a stretch.
    Unfortunately, your Mac would need OSX to do it for less expense. There is
    "third party" software available.
    A Goggle search would be the best way to locate it and find prices. Windows
    2000 has the AppleTalk protocol
    available and can be installed. I am not sure if ME has it available as an
    option to install.
    Prior to OSX, we were forced to install a server with AppleTalk installed,
    purchase AppleTalk from Apple,
    and install AppleTalk on the client machines and establish a network with
    apple products. It sometimes may
    require a third party software package to complete the connection. Not all
    configurations do require additional
    software.

    Considering OSX x is based on free BSD Linux, it has software called "Samba"
    installed as part of their OS.
    Samba is used on a Linux box to connect, file and print share with a windows
    network. It can also connect
    Windows machines. It does not need an additional server. It takes just a few
    mouse clicks to set it up
    That is the background concerning Apple/Windows networking.
    I tell you all of this to add the following...
    The bottom line is that floppies made with Apple are in a format that
    Windows machines cannot read
    and visa versa. "Apples and Oranges".
    So, you are between the old "rock and a hard place". It will take a
    different method to transfer files.
    Goggle is your best solution for research. I have been in Networking for
    many years and the method
    you are attempting to use just will not work.
    Good Luck
    Computer Guy










    "wendell taylor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Like Bill, I have been trying to transfer all my spreadsheets, databases &
    > accounting from my old Apple IIe (1985) to my Windows ME so I don't have

    to
    > develope them all over again. Keeps saying Do I want to format the 5-1/4"
    > disk?
    > Then says "- can't be read so can't format" or something. It may

    impossible
    > to transfer from one platform to another but any help or confirmation of
    > this would be appreciated.
    > Thanks, Wendell.
    >
    >
     
    Computer Guy, Nov 2, 2003
    #7
  8. Howdy!

    "Computer Guy" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:u_ob.130006$gv5.88854@fed1read05...
    > Hello.
    > You could try it with networking or possibly PCAnywhere. PcAnywhere would

    be
    > a stretch.


    Huh? PC Anywhere on a //e?

    > Unfortunately, your Mac would need OSX to do it for less expense. There is
    > "third party" software available.


    Ah. The infamous "head up ass" syndrome.

    Since WHEN is an Apple //e a Macintosh? Since about never ..

    > A Goggle search would be the best way to locate it and find prices.

    Windows
    > 2000 has the AppleTalk protocol
    > available and can be installed. I am not sure if ME has it available as an
    > option to install.


    2K Server, to be precise - 2K Pro doesn't support AppleTalk.

    Natively, anyway.

    > Prior to OSX, we were forced to install a server with AppleTalk installed,
    > purchase AppleTalk from Apple,
    > and install AppleTalk on the client machines and establish a network with
    > apple products. It sometimes may
    > require a third party software package to complete the connection. Not all
    > configurations do require additional


    Now you really ARE talking out of your ass. There were other
    methods for file transfer. Always had been.

    "we were forced" only because you were STUPID.

    > software.
    >
    > Considering OSX x is based on free BSD Linux, it has software called

    "Samba"
    > installed as part of their OS.


    Is it based on BSD, or Linux? Two different code trees there,
    Computer Guy.

    Hint: BSD is where a lot of the current Unix tree came from. And,
    yes, Linus and others have used open source BSD utilities in the Linux tree.
    But there ain't no Linux in OSX.

    > Samba is used on a Linux box to connect, file and print share with a

    windows
    > network. It can also connect
    > Windows machines. It does not need an additional server. It takes just a

    few
    > mouse clicks to set it up
    > That is the background concerning Apple/Windows networking.
    > I tell you all of this to add the following...
    > The bottom line is that floppies made with Apple are in a format that
    > Windows machines cannot read
    > and visa versa. "Apples and Oranges".
    > So, you are between the old "rock and a hard place". It will take a
    > different method to transfer files.
    > Goggle is your best solution for research. I have been in Networking for
    > many years and the method
    > you are attempting to use just will not work.
    > Good Luck
    > Computer Guy


    Gee - wonder why I was able to read and write Apple //e and Macintosh
    floppies on PCs then? Did take some extra hardware, true - the cheap method
    was RS-232 for the Apple //e.

    Now, on the Mac, I could read and write PC formatted 3.5" floppies
    and even SCSI hard disks ... and still can.

    RwP
     
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Nov 2, 2003
    #8
  9. wendell taylor

    Computer Guy Guest

    Hello,
    Ah a small difference in opinion. That is obviously healthy.nothing wrong
    with a lively discussion.
    I am primarily a Windows Guy. I very rarely work with Apple or McIntosh
    machines unless I have
    to integrate them into a Windows network. Then we use OSX because the Samba
    server is built right
    in. Now on a McIntosh may "call it" something else, but it is Samba.
    You obviously work a lot with various machines from the Apple/McIntosh
    family.
    However, OSX is based on FreeBSD Linux. Go to the Apple site and read about
    it yourself.
    I have spent hour upon hour reading about the OS.. I would love to have a
    Mac w/OSX just so I can learn more
    about OSX.
    Anyway, disregard my post. Apparently I have no idea what I am talking about
    when it comes to Apple/McIntosh.
    I regret any incontinence I may have cussed to any and all involved with
    this discussion.
    If you have a question concerning Windows 95/98/ME/2000 or XP, give me a
    buzz. I do know Windows and Linux.
    Thank You for your time!
    Computer Guy

    "Ralph Wade Phillips" <> wrote in message
    news:bo3hv8$17diat$-berlin.de...
    > Howdy!
    >
    > "Computer Guy" <> wrote in message
    > news:eek:u_ob.130006$gv5.88854@fed1read05...
    > > Hello.
    > > You could try it with networking or possibly PCAnywhere. PcAnywhere

    would
    > be
    > > a stretch.

    >
    > Huh? PC Anywhere on a //e?
    >
    > > Unfortunately, your Mac would need OSX to do it for less expense. There

    is
    > > "third party" software available.

    >
    > Ah. The infamous "head up ass" syndrome.
    >
    > Since WHEN is an Apple //e a Macintosh? Since about never ..
    >
    > > A Goggle search would be the best way to locate it and find prices.

    > Windows
    > > 2000 has the AppleTalk protocol
    > > available and can be installed. I am not sure if ME has it available as

    an
    > > option to install.

    >
    > 2K Server, to be precise - 2K Pro doesn't support AppleTalk.
    >
    > Natively, anyway.
    >
    > > Prior to OSX, we were forced to install a server with AppleTalk

    installed,
    > > purchase AppleTalk from Apple,
    > > and install AppleTalk on the client machines and establish a network

    with
    > > apple products. It sometimes may
    > > require a third party software package to complete the connection. Not

    all
    > > configurations do require additional

    >
    > Now you really ARE talking out of your ass. There were other
    > methods for file transfer. Always had been.
    >
    > "we were forced" only because you were STUPID.
    >
    > > software.
    > >
    > > Considering OSX x is based on free BSD Linux, it has software called

    > "Samba"
    > > installed as part of their OS.

    >
    > Is it based on BSD, or Linux? Two different code trees there,
    > Computer Guy.
    >
    > Hint: BSD is where a lot of the current Unix tree came from.

    And,
    > yes, Linus and others have used open source BSD utilities in the Linux

    tree.
    > But there ain't no Linux in OSX.
    >
    > > Samba is used on a Linux box to connect, file and print share with a

    > windows
    > > network. It can also connect
    > > Windows machines. It does not need an additional server. It takes just a

    > few
    > > mouse clicks to set it up
    > > That is the background concerning Apple/Windows networking.
    > > I tell you all of this to add the following...
    > > The bottom line is that floppies made with Apple are in a format that
    > > Windows machines cannot read
    > > and visa versa. "Apples and Oranges".
    > > So, you are between the old "rock and a hard place". It will take a
    > > different method to transfer files.
    > > Goggle is your best solution for research. I have been in Networking for
    > > many years and the method
    > > you are attempting to use just will not work.
    > > Good Luck
    > > Computer Guy

    >
    > Gee - wonder why I was able to read and write Apple //e and

    Macintosh
    > floppies on PCs then? Did take some extra hardware, true - the cheap

    method
    > was RS-232 for the Apple //e.
    >
    > Now, on the Mac, I could read and write PC formatted 3.5" floppies
    > and even SCSI hard disks ... and still can.
    >
    > RwP
    >
    >
     
    Computer Guy, Nov 3, 2003
    #9
  10. wendell taylor

    SgtSilicon Guest

    On the Windows Platform, Microsoft Office can import quite a variety
    of other file formats. Unfortunately, it probably can't directly
    import file formats from software from the Apple II era. The good
    news is though, most software packages allow for an import and an
    export of text type files (with comma delimited or comma separated
    values or some such similar). With this in mind, I suggest something
    like the following...

    1. On the Apple II platform, export or save all your data files as
    standard text type with comma separated values or what ever is going
    to work best or allowed.

    2. Set up a null modem cable between the Apple II and the PCs serial
    port.

    3. Use terminal software (Windows has Hyperterminal already included
    for free) on both machines and transfer the file from the Apple II to
    the Windows box.

    4. Import the files into MS Office or Works or whatever you use on the
    Windows box.

    I have successfully done this between my Atari 800 and Win 3.1 machine
    years ago. Keep in mind that some fancy features of your data files
    will likely be lost when converting to a standard readable text
    variety, but at least you can get most of the data.

    Another option is to also transfer the real proprietary data files
    (AppleWorks or whatever they are) to the Win box and run an Apple II
    emulator on you Win box. If those real proprietary data files happen
    to be something as popular as Visicalc, Wordstar (was that made for
    Apple?) or something, MS Works or Office may be able to direct import.
    Not sure.

    The main thing is to get the files and the text version of the files
    transferred from the Apple II to the Win box and decide from there.





    On Fri, 31 Oct 2003 16:10:25 -0800, "wendell taylor"
    <> wrote:

    >Like Bill, I have been trying to transfer all my spreadsheets, databases &
    >accounting from my old Apple IIe (1985) to my Windows ME so I don't have to
    >develope them all over again. Keeps saying Do I want to format the 5-1/4"
    >disk?
    >Then says "- can't be read so can't format" or something. It may impossible
    >to transfer from one platform to another but any help or confirmation of
    >this would be appreciated.
    >Thanks, Wendell.
    >




    ** To email a reply, please remove everything up to and
    including the underscore in my email reply header.
     
    SgtSilicon, Nov 3, 2003
    #10
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