data security

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by geo, Jan 13, 2006.

  1. geo

    geo Guest

    in General terms if a web site is using https or Verisign
    how secure is the data traversing the network or internet
    from server to client?

    For example if a user had no security set up on their personal PC but they
    visit a site that is protected via Verisign HTTPS

    Also how secure is using something like Verizon's broadband wireless
    service?
     
    geo, Jan 13, 2006
    #1
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  2. geo

    Beachcomber Guest

    On Fri, 13 Jan 2006 13:52:21 -0500, "geo" <>
    wrote:

    >in General terms if a web site is using https or Verisign
    >how secure is the data traversing the network or internet
    >from server to client?


    The secure server works in conjunction with your web browser to
    encrypt traffic both ways. When you see a little locked padlock at
    the bottom of your browser, generally you can expect that this
    encryption is taking place.

    How secure is this encryption method? I'll leave that some be
    answered by some of the smart people in this group.

    But whatever the strength, this is what most people rely upon when
    using a secured server to do their Internet banking, webmail, etc.
    >
    >For example if a user had no security set up on their personal PC but they
    >visit a site that is protected via Verisign HTTPS


    They would need a browser capable of doing the 128 bit encryption that
    is established when communicating with a secured server. These are
    free (the obvious one being Microsoft Internet Explorer).

    The Verisign part is just an expensive certificate that the owner of
    the server must buy to supposedly convince users of his/her system
    that they are who they say they are.
    >
    >Also how secure is using something like Verizon's broadband wireless
    >service?
    >


    There was a saying during WWII that "all wireless is treason". Though
    Verizon's service may or may not be encrypted, the fact that it
    sending and receiving packets wirelessly over a wide geographic area
    makes it less secure than a dedicated landline Internet connection.

    There are many, many Internet applications that may carry sensitive
    material (e-mail for one) that are not necessarily encrypted. It's
    sort of like giving credit card numbers out over an analog cell phone.
    Some people don't have a problem with this, but most tech-savvy people
    know that there are bad guys out there with easy-to-modify Radio Shack
    800 Mhz scanners that can hear their conversations, even though the
    government says that this is illegal.

    Most of the network adminstrators that I know are still (rightly so)
    paranoid over using wireless connections for their corporate computer
    systems that carry sensitive material. The real world effect though,
    is that often convenience wins out and everybody wants their WI-FI
    hotspots. The average user has very little concern for security.

    Beachcomber
     
    Beachcomber, Jan 14, 2006
    #2
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