Data Recovery from a Non-Spinning HDD

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Steve Meyerson, Aug 18, 2007.

  1. My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I was able
    to read its files using a bootable CD I created from PE-Builder.

    After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no longer
    spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and in an HDD
    enclosure using USB).

    Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it rise
    from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides prayer?

    Steve M.
     
    Steve Meyerson, Aug 18, 2007
    #1
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  2. Steve Meyerson

    philo Guest

    "Steve Meyerson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I was able
    > to read its files using a bootable CD I created from PE-Builder.
    >
    > After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no longer
    > spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and in an HDD
    > enclosure using USB).
    >
    > Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it rise
    > from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides prayer?
    >
    > Steve M.
    >
    >


    On rare occasions you can get a drive going again temporarily...
    by putting it in a freezer for a while.
    Though it probably will not work...
    be prepared to back it up at once!



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    philo, Aug 18, 2007
    #2
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  3. Steve Meyerson

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 15:07:22 +0000, Steve Meyerson wrote:

    > My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I was able
    > to read its files using a bootable CD I created from PE-Builder.
    >
    > After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no longer
    > spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and in an HDD
    > enclosure using USB).
    >
    > Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it rise
    > from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides prayer?
    >


    Prayer would be one way. You might try tapping lightly on a hard surface
    as the drive electronics may have an intermittent connection. Other than
    that, no way for you to resurrect it. There are data recovery companies
    but they are expensive however unless you have some data that you just
    can't go on living without or have a lot of cash they are pretty much cost
    prohibitive.
     
    Meat Plow, Aug 18, 2007
    #3
  4. Steve Meyerson

    HEMI-Powered Guest

    Steve Meyerson added these comments in the current discussion du
    jour ...

    > My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I
    > was able to read its files using a bootable CD I created from
    > PE-Builder.
    >
    > After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no
    > longer spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and
    > in an HDD enclosure using USB).
    >
    > Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it
    > rise from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides
    > prayer?
    >

    How much money do you want to spend on this, Steve? I'm aware of
    forensic data recovery experts locally and can Google for them
    that charge in the range of $100+/hour, sometimes double that, to
    recover lost data. These people are usually hired when a HD
    crashes but doesn't get totally destroyed and the owner wants to
    recover as much as possible and they're hired by law enforcement
    and attorney's to try to recover evidence that may have been
    deleted.

    But, these people as well as SOME tecnies in SOME places like
    Best Buy's Geek Squad are skilled enough to do data recovery from
    a dead HD. I see signs in the stores around me advertising basic
    charges for in-home and in-store repairs of the normal kind and
    the hourly rates. Seems like their hourly rate is around $75.

    So, if it turns out to be as simple as freezing the disk,
    whacking it with a hammer - that will fix anything! - or other
    tricks of the trade, it might cost you a century note to get it,
    but if the data is valuable enough, they can help.

    But, I just have to ask this question: Why don't you simply
    recover your friend's data from his optical or external HD
    backups? What? No backups? Well, son, to be blunt, that's tough.
    This is yet another example of what I've seen over and over for a
    couple of decades: people decide that a rigorous backup scheme
    should be instituted the day AFTER their last disk crash.

    Good luck!


    --
    HP, aka Jerry
     
    HEMI-Powered, Aug 18, 2007
    #4
  5. Steve Meyerson

    HEMI-Powered Guest

    Meat Plow added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    ....

    >> My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I
    >> was able to read its files using a bootable CD I created
    >> from PE-Builder.
    >>
    >> After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive
    >> no longer spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop
    >> and in an HDD enclosure using USB).
    >>
    >> Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it
    >> rise from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides
    >> prayer?
    >>

    >
    > Prayer would be one way. You might try tapping lightly on a
    > hard surface as the drive electronics may have an intermittent
    > connection. Other than that, no way for you to resurrect it.
    > There are data recovery companies but they are expensive
    > however unless you have some data that you just can't go on
    > living without or have a lot of cash they are pretty much cost
    > prohibitive.
    >

    Meat Plow, I just commented to the effect you did to the OP, but
    included my standard plug: backup, backup, backup! It simply
    astounds me the vast number of users, approaching 100%, that have
    no concept of sound backup practice or malware protection. They
    may well be novices, but that isn't a fatal disease. What IS
    fatal is naivete which lulls one into complacency that, just
    because I've been running fine doesn't mean I won't be cold and
    dead 10 minutes from now.

    Some people are lazy, some are just busy, and some don't have
    money, but my personal backup scheme is primarily to two 200 gig
    external HDs. One stays in a locked fireproof box off the floor
    in my basement and the other is in my bank's safety deposit box.
    Periodically, generally every 45-60 days, I do an very
    comprehensive malware scan on both my PCs and back up BOTH in
    their entirety to one of the externals, including a C:\ full
    partition image using Acronis True Image 9.0. And, from time-to-
    time, I'll burn single- and dual-layer DVDs as a back-up to the
    externals and store THOSE at my bank. What I'm interested in
    besides a HW disaster or a malware infestation that brings me
    down OR a Windows update failur or the like is in ALSO preventing
    a total loss in the case of even a minor house fire or from a
    natural disaster such as a violent wind and rain storm or a 100-
    year snow blizzard that collapses my roof and kills my two
    upstairs offices. Any/all of these things make keeping backups of
    any kind in my home less than optimal for safety.

    So, I am never more than 60 days out for my own data. I'd like to
    also comment that one reason why many home users I personally
    know are so lacksadaisical is that they're used to automatic
    server backups at work and never have had to worry about the time
    when there is no company tech support to save them.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry
     
    HEMI-Powered, Aug 18, 2007
    #5
  6. Steve Meyerson

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 16:54:59 +0000, HEMI-Powered wrote:

    > Meat Plow added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    > ...
    >
    >>> My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I
    >>> was able to read its files using a bootable CD I created
    >>> from PE-Builder.
    >>>
    >>> After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive
    >>> no longer spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop
    >>> and in an HDD enclosure using USB).
    >>>
    >>> Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it
    >>> rise from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides
    >>> prayer?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Prayer would be one way. You might try tapping lightly on a
    >> hard surface as the drive electronics may have an intermittent
    >> connection. Other than that, no way for you to resurrect it.
    >> There are data recovery companies but they are expensive
    >> however unless you have some data that you just can't go on
    >> living without or have a lot of cash they are pretty much cost
    >> prohibitive.
    >>

    > Meat Plow, I just commented to the effect you did to the OP, but
    > included my standard plug: backup, backup, backup! It simply
    > astounds me the vast number of users, approaching 100%, that have
    > no concept of sound backup practice or malware protection. They
    > may well be novices, but that isn't a fatal disease. What IS
    > fatal is naivete which lulls one into complacency that, just
    > because I've been running fine doesn't mean I won't be cold and
    > dead 10 minutes from now.
    >
    > Some people are lazy, some are just busy, and some don't have
    > money, but my personal backup scheme is primarily to two 200 gig
    > external HDs. One stays in a locked fireproof box off the floor
    > in my basement and the other is in my bank's safety deposit box.
    > Periodically, generally every 45-60 days, I do an very
    > comprehensive malware scan on both my PCs and back up BOTH in
    > their entirety to one of the externals, including a C:\ full
    > partition image using Acronis True Image 9.0. And, from time-to-
    > time, I'll burn single- and dual-layer DVDs as a back-up to the
    > externals and store THOSE at my bank. What I'm interested in
    > besides a HW disaster or a malware infestation that brings me
    > down OR a Windows update failur or the like is in ALSO preventing
    > a total loss in the case of even a minor house fire or from a
    > natural disaster such as a violent wind and rain storm or a 100-
    > year snow blizzard that collapses my roof and kills my two
    > upstairs offices. Any/all of these things make keeping backups of
    > any kind in my home less than optimal for safety.
    >
    > So, I am never more than 60 days out for my own data. I'd like to
    > also comment that one reason why many home users I personally
    > know are so lacksadaisical is that they're used to automatic
    > server backups at work and never have had to worry about the time
    > when there is no company tech support to save them.


    Agree 200%. Back your profile and data up unless you can afford to lose it
    all. And know where your data is so you get it all. A couple hundred bucks
    can get you a 500 gig external drive plenty big enough for your data and
    profile. many times over. My critical files on network
    storage here at home and my office. And the storage servers back
    themselves up to a hidden drive every night so I am very redundant. Plus I
    have a mirror image of my operating systems on a shelved 500 gig drive.
    When this one blows it's just a matter of swapping them out, mirroring a
    new drive and placing that one on the shelf. I havent suffered a
    catastrophic loss of data since I've been set up this way 4 years ago.
     
    Meat Plow, Aug 18, 2007
    #6
  7. Steve Meyerson

    HEMI-Powered Guest

    Meat Plow added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    ....

    >> So, I am never more than 60 days out for my own data. I'd
    >> like to also comment that one reason why many home users I
    >> personally know are so lacksadaisical is that they're used to
    >> automatic server backups at work and never have had to worry
    >> about the time when there is no company tech support to save
    >> them.

    >
    > Agree 200%. Back your profile and data up unless you can
    > afford to lose it all. And know where your data is so you get
    > it all. A couple hundred bucks can get you a 500 gig external
    > drive plenty big enough for your data and profile. many times
    > over. My critical files on network storage here at home and
    > my office. And the storage servers back themselves up to a
    > hidden drive every night so I am very redundant. Plus I have a
    > mirror image of my operating systems on a shelved 500 gig
    > drive. When this one blows it's just a matter of swapping them
    > out, mirroring a new drive and placing that one on the shelf.
    > I havent suffered a catastrophic loss of data since I've been
    > set up this way 4 years ago.
    >

    Today's couple of "Help!" OPs galvanized me into action - I've
    been ill and haven't done my extensive backup regiment for more
    than 2 months now. It isn't all that much work to do this stuff
    because I just spawn a job like a Pest Patrol scan that'll take
    several hours or a NAV 2006 scan that takes all day, and I can do
    other things in the meantime.

    I described my backup to external, but your point is extremely
    well taken. Prices of large capacity externals are dropping like
    a rock in the last couple of years.

    Incidently, it has been at least 15 years since I first started
    creating one or more extended data-only partitions because I knew
    of people that were friends and those I supported on my job that
    got all their personal data carried to the trashbin by a partial
    disk crash affecting the primary partition, or they needed to
    wipe C:\ clean and reinstall Windows and thus had no opportunity
    to save their data.

    I COULD use my two PCs to mirror each other but my current HDs
    are too small for that and externals are so cheap. I've not yet
    gotten nervous enough to be ready with a HD sitting ready for the
    2nd bay to connect in a hurry, things have been pretty stable and
    as long as I can get USB 2 working, I'll be OK.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry
     
    HEMI-Powered, Aug 18, 2007
    #7
  8. Steve Meyerson wrote:
    > My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I was able
    > to read its files using a bootable CD I created from PE-Builder.
    >
    > After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no longer
    > spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and in an HDD
    > enclosure using USB).
    >
    > Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it rise
    > from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides prayer?


    I've not tried this myself, but I had a close friend tell me he actually
    took the case of a hard drive apart and when the computer was starting,
    he spun the platters with his finger on the outer rim. He said the thing
    got going and read the disk fine. It was a customer's computer. He told
    them to immediately back up everything they wanted to keep, he'd be back
    later. When he returned they were still using the disassembled hard
    drive. He said that was 3 months ago, they're still using that hard drive.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Aug 18, 2007
    #8
  9. On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 16:36:42 -0000, "HEMI-Powered" <>
    wrote:

    >Steve Meyerson added these comments in the current discussion du
    >jour ...
    >
    >> My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I
    >> was able to read its files using a bootable CD I created from
    >> PE-Builder.
    >>
    >> After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no
    >> longer spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and
    >> in an HDD enclosure using USB).
    >>
    >> Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it
    >> rise from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides
    >> prayer?
    >>

    >How much money do you want to spend on this, Steve? I'm aware of
    >forensic data recovery experts locally and can Google for them
    >that charge in the range of $100+/hour, sometimes double that, to
    >recover lost data. These people are usually hired when a HD
    >crashes but doesn't get totally destroyed and the owner wants to
    >recover as much as possible and they're hired by law enforcement
    >and attorney's to try to recover evidence that may have been
    >deleted.
    >
    >But, these people as well as SOME tecnies in SOME places like
    >Best Buy's Geek Squad are skilled enough to do data recovery from
    >a dead HD. I see signs in the stores around me advertising basic
    >charges for in-home and in-store repairs of the normal kind and
    >the hourly rates. Seems like their hourly rate is around $75.
    >
    >So, if it turns out to be as simple as freezing the disk,
    >whacking it with a hammer - that will fix anything! - or other
    >tricks of the trade, it might cost you a century note to get it,
    >but if the data is valuable enough, they can help.
    >
    >But, I just have to ask this question: Why don't you simply
    >recover your friend's data from his optical or external HD
    >backups? What? No backups? Well, son, to be blunt, that's tough.
    >This is yet another example of what I've seen over and over for a
    >couple of decades: people decide that a rigorous backup scheme
    >should be instituted the day AFTER their last disk crash.
    >
    >Good luck!


    Thanks. I had a feeling I might get some backup religion here. And I
    totally agree. In this case the daughter of a friend has two years
    worth of her college work on the computer including resume(s) and a
    zillion songs (sigh) - probably about 30-40 gigs..

    As far as hard drives crashing, it's not IF, it's WHEN. She bought a
    new backup drive, so the barn door is closed, albeit a little late. At
    this point, I'll try the freezer thing, but I don't think she wants to
    spend $500 to recover the data.

    What's really frustrating to me is I was reading the data when the
    drive was in the laptop and could have backed it up then using a 2Gb
    memory stick - a long job because neither my LAN nor my USB hard drive
    would work with the boot disk I was using.

    Steve

    ..
     
    Steve Meyerson, Aug 18, 2007
    #9
  10. On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 15:27:54 -0400, Rôgêr <> wrote:

    >Steve Meyerson wrote:
    >> My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I was able
    >> to read its files using a bootable CD I created from PE-Builder.
    >>
    >> After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no longer
    >> spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and in an HDD
    >> enclosure using USB).
    >>
    >> Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it rise
    >> from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides prayer?

    >
    >I've not tried this myself, but I had a close friend tell me he actually
    >took the case of a hard drive apart and when the computer was starting,
    >he spun the platters with his finger on the outer rim. He said the thing
    >got going and read the disk fine. It was a customer's computer. He told
    >them to immediately back up everything they wanted to keep, he'd be back
    >later. When he returned they were still using the disassembled hard
    >drive. He said that was 3 months ago, they're still using that hard drive.



    That's a good one too! I'll try that after the freezer suggestion
    (when the drive thaws out of course:).
    Steve
     
    Steve Meyerson, Aug 18, 2007
    #10
  11. Steve Meyerson

    Ron Martell Guest

    Steve Meyerson <> wrote:

    >My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I was able
    >to read its files using a bootable CD I created from PE-Builder.
    >
    >After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no longer
    >spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and in an HDD
    >enclosure using USB).
    >
    >Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it rise
    >from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides prayer?
    >
    >Steve M.
    >


    With older drives this was a fairly common problem, and the cause then
    was "stiction" (sticking friction). The read/write heads would go to
    the parking location where they would rest on the actual surface of
    the disk. Sometimes the two surfaces (the read/write head and the
    drive surface) would become so polished and super-smooth that they
    would actually adhere to each other, blocking the drive from spinning.

    The cure for these drives was a one-shot kill-or-cure treatment
    consisting of smacking the drive firmly onto the workbench so as to
    shake the heads loose. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn't.

    Good luck

    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP (1997 - 2008)
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

    "Anyone who thinks that they are too small to make a difference
    has never been in bed with a mosquito."
     
    Ron Martell, Aug 18, 2007
    #11
  12. Steve Meyerson

    philo Guest

    "Steve Meyerson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 15:27:54 -0400, Rôgêr <> wrote:
    >
    > >Steve Meyerson wrote:
    > >> My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I was able
    > >> to read its files using a bootable CD I created from PE-Builder.
    > >>
    > >> After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no longer
    > >> spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and in an HDD
    > >> enclosure using USB).
    > >>
    > >> Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it rise
    > >> from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides prayer?

    > >
    > >I've not tried this myself, but I had a close friend tell me he actually
    > >took the case of a hard drive apart and when the computer was starting,
    > >he spun the platters with his finger on the outer rim. He said the thing
    > >got going and read the disk fine. It was a customer's computer. He told
    > >them to immediately back up everything they wanted to keep, he'd be back
    > >later. When he returned they were still using the disassembled hard
    > >drive. He said that was 3 months ago, they're still using that hard

    drive.
    >
    >
    > That's a good one too! I'll try that after the freezer suggestion
    > (when the drive thaws out of course:).
    > Steve



    try the drive while it's still cold...



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    philo, Aug 18, 2007
    #12
  13. On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 15:32:03 -0500, "philo" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Steve Meyerson" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 15:27:54 -0400, Rôgêr <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Steve Meyerson wrote:
    >> >> My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I was able
    >> >> to read its files using a bootable CD I created from PE-Builder.
    >> >>
    >> >> After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no longer
    >> >> spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and in an HDD
    >> >> enclosure using USB).
    >> >>
    >> >> Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it rise
    >> >> from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides prayer?
    >> >
    >> >I've not tried this myself, but I had a close friend tell me he actually
    >> >took the case of a hard drive apart and when the computer was starting,
    >> >he spun the platters with his finger on the outer rim. He said the thing
    >> >got going and read the disk fine. It was a customer's computer. He told
    >> >them to immediately back up everything they wanted to keep, he'd be back
    >> >later. When he returned they were still using the disassembled hard
    >> >drive. He said that was 3 months ago, they're still using that hard

    >drive.
    >>
    >>
    >> That's a good one too! I'll try that after the freezer suggestion
    >> (when the drive thaws out of course:).
    >> Steve

    >
    >
    >try the drive while it's still cold...


    Right. I misstated my intention, which was to try the "cover removal"
    idea afterthe thaw. :)
     
    Steve Meyerson, Aug 18, 2007
    #13
  14. Thanks for the good suggestions, guys. I tried them all. Unfortunately
    for my friend, I wasn't able to be the hero.

    The freezer thing didn't work.

    I had the case off and was able to spin the platters with power
    attached, so they weren't stuck, but they wouldn't continuing
    spinning. And the heads didn't seem free to move across the platters,
    but that might be normal for all I know.

    I did notice a rocker arm at the edge of the case came detached, but I
    couldn't figure out how to reattach it.

    Anyway, thanks again for your help.

    Steve M.
     
    Steve Meyerson, Aug 18, 2007
    #14
  15. Steve Meyerson

    philo Guest

    "Steve Meyerson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 15:32:03 -0500, "philo" <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Steve Meyerson" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > >> On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 15:27:54 -0400, Rôgêr <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >Steve Meyerson wrote:
    > >> >> My friend's laptop's 2.5" hard drive became unbootable, but I was

    able
    > >> >> to read its files using a bootable CD I created from PE-Builder.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> After Dell replaced her drive with a new one, the old drive no

    longer
    > >> >> spins for some reason (I tried it in my own laptop and in an HDD
    > >> >> enclosure using USB).
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Am I SOL, or is there any possible thing I can try to make it rise
    > >> >> from the dead (i.e. get it spinning again) besides prayer?
    > >> >
    > >> >I've not tried this myself, but I had a close friend tell me he

    actually
    > >> >took the case of a hard drive apart and when the computer was

    starting,
    > >> >he spun the platters with his finger on the outer rim. He said the

    thing
    > >> >got going and read the disk fine. It was a customer's computer. He

    told
    > >> >them to immediately back up everything they wanted to keep, he'd be

    back
    > >> >later. When he returned they were still using the disassembled hard
    > >> >drive. He said that was 3 months ago, they're still using that hard

    > >drive.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> That's a good one too! I'll try that after the freezer suggestion
    > >> (when the drive thaws out of course:).
    > >> Steve

    > >
    > >
    > >try the drive while it's still cold...

    >
    > Right. I misstated my intention, which was to try the "cover removal"
    > idea afterthe thaw. :)



    That's worth a try too...
    I got one going once that way too...
    it even worked for a few weeks after that...

    but 99% of the time...it's a no go :(



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    philo, Aug 19, 2007
    #15
  16. Steve Meyerson

    HEMI-Powered Guest

    Steve Meyerson added these comments in the current discussion du
    jour ...

    > Thanks. I had a feeling I might get some backup religion here.
    > And I totally agree. In this case the daughter of a friend
    > has two years worth of her college work on the computer
    > including resume(s) and a zillion songs (sigh) - probably
    > about 30-40 gigs..


    Are you kidding? This girl had 40 gig of college work on the PC
    that went dead, with NO backup?

    > As far as hard drives crashing, it's not IF, it's WHEN. She
    > bought a new backup drive, so the barn door is closed, albeit
    > a little late. At this point, I'll try the freezer thing, but
    > I don't think she wants to spend $500 to recover the data.


    I didn't say it would cost $500, I thought more like $100, maybe
    $200. But, she is the only one that can place a value on that,
    which is primarily calculated by the hours of effort to retype/redo
    everything from paper copies.

    > What's really frustrating to me is I was reading the data when
    > the drive was in the laptop and could have backed it up then
    > using a 2Gb memory stick - a long job because neither my LAN
    > nor my USB hard drive would work with the boot disk I was
    > using.
    >

    "Fool me once, shame on you, shame me twice, shame on me". This
    girl learned a very valuable object lesson early in life, it may be
    a good thing in the long-run. Most of us who give backup religion
    seminars speaketh from experience, people should consider that.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry
     
    HEMI-Powered, Aug 19, 2007
    #16
  17. Steve Meyerson wrote:
    > Thanks for the good suggestions, guys. I tried them all. Unfortunately
    > for my friend, I wasn't able to be the hero.
    >
    > The freezer thing didn't work.
    >
    > I had the case off and was able to spin the platters with power
    > attached, so they weren't stuck, but they wouldn't continuing
    > spinning. And the heads didn't seem free to move across the platters,
    > but that might be normal for all I know.
    >
    > I did notice a rocker arm at the edge of the case came detached, but I
    > couldn't figure out how to reattach it.
    >
    > Anyway, thanks again for your help.


    R.I.P.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Aug 19, 2007
    #17
  18. Steve Meyerson

    philo Guest

    "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Steve Meyerson wrote:
    >> Thanks for the good suggestions, guys. I tried them all. Unfortunately
    >> for my friend, I wasn't able to be the hero.
    >>
    >> The freezer thing didn't work.
    >>
    >> I had the case off and was able to spin the platters with power
    >> attached, so they weren't stuck, but they wouldn't continuing
    >> spinning. And the heads didn't seem free to move across the platters,
    >> but that might be normal for all I know.
    >>
    >> I did notice a rocker arm at the edge of the case came detached, but I
    >> couldn't figure out how to reattach it.
    >>
    >> Anyway, thanks again for your help.

    >
    > R.I.P.



    Well it's dead allright.
    Hopefully it was not anything too terribly critical :(
     
    philo, Aug 19, 2007
    #18
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