Dark indoor shots

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Frankly, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. Frankly

    Frankly Guest

    Hello Everyone.

    I have the cool pix 8400. I take a lot of indoor shots and sometimes i am
    in dark and long apartments.
    I did do some reading and understand I need to do more. I guess I am just
    looking for people to talk to
    to help me understand where i should concentrate my studies.
    the 8400 as you know does not have anit shake for picture taking and
    sometimes i like to hold the camera over my head. I have learned i can undo
    some of this by switching to shutter speed priority but find
    it hard to make the pictures in dark places look light. someone even said i
    should try a shutter speed of 125 that just comes out way to dark. Today i
    will be taking pictures using the tri pod but that does not allow me for the
    hight i want and i ride a motorcycle so i would rather not have to take it
    with me.
    I want to make windows look as sunny as possible and long dark apartments
    look light enough to see the details. I am also working with Photoshop
    elements 4.0. any help you can give would be great.

    thank you

    John
    Frankly, Nov 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. Frankly

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    Frankly wrote:
    > Hello Everyone.
    >
    > I have the cool pix 8400. I take a lot of indoor shots and sometimes i am
    > in dark and long apartments.
    > I did do some reading and understand I need to do more. I guess I am just
    > looking for people to talk to
    > to help me understand where i should concentrate my studies.
    > the 8400 as you know does not have anit shake for picture taking and
    > sometimes i like to hold the camera over my head. I have learned i can undo
    > some of this by switching to shutter speed priority but find
    > it hard to make the pictures in dark places look light. someone even said i
    > should try a shutter speed of 125 that just comes out way to dark. Today i
    > will be taking pictures using the tri pod but that does not allow me for the
    > hight i want and i ride a motorcycle so i would rather not have to take it
    > with me.
    > I want to make windows look as sunny as possible and long dark apartments
    > look light enough to see the details. I am also working with Photoshop
    > elements 4.0. any help you can give would be great.
    >
    > thank you
    >
    > John


    Hi John...

    Suspect that if you're taking wide shots in large rooms and/or
    hallways the built in flash won't be of much use to you...

    Suggest that you try using iso 400; might help at the expense
    of more noise in your pics...

    Another option might be to try the "museum" setting in your
    scene menu, see if you like that better.

    Take care.

    Ken
    Ken Weitzel, Nov 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. Frankly

    Neil Ellwood Guest

    Frankly wrote:
    > Hello Everyone.
    >
    > I have the cool pix 8400. I take a lot of indoor shots and sometimes i am
    > in dark and long apartments.
    > I did do some reading and understand I need to do more. I guess I am just
    > looking for people to talk to
    > to help me understand where i should concentrate my studies.
    > the 8400 as you know does not have anit shake for picture taking and
    > sometimes i like to hold the camera over my head. I have learned i can undo
    > some of this by switching to shutter speed priority but find
    > it hard to make the pictures in dark places look light. someone even said i
    > should try a shutter speed of 125 that just comes out way to dark. Today i
    > will be taking pictures using the tri pod but that does not allow me for the
    > hight i want and i ride a motorcycle so i would rather not have to take it
    > with me.
    > I want to make windows look as sunny as possible and long dark apartments
    > look light enough to see the details. I am also working with Photoshop
    > elements 4.0. any help you can give would be great.
    >
    > thank you
    >
    > John
    >
    >

    Use a tripod ( or a firm rest of some sort) and a remote switch if your
    camera allows it.

    --
    Neil
    swap 'ra' and delete 'l' for email
    Neil Ellwood, Nov 12, 2006
    #3
  4. Frankly <> wrote:


    : Hello Everyone.

    : I have the cool pix 8400. I take a lot of indoor shots and sometimes i
    : am in dark and long apartments.
    : I did do some reading and understand I need to do more. I guess I am
    : just looking for people to talk to to help me understand where i should
    : concentrate my studies.
    : the 8400 as you know does not have anit shake for picture taking and
    : sometimes i like to hold the camera over my head. I have learned i can
    : undo some of this by switching to shutter speed priority but find
    : it hard to make the pictures in dark places look light. someone even
    : said i should try a shutter speed of 125 that just comes out way to
    : dark. Today i will be taking pictures using the tri pod but that does
    : not allow me for the hight i want and i ride a motorcycle so i would
    : rather not have to take it with me.
    : I want to make windows look as sunny as possible and long dark
    : apartments look light enough to see the details. I am also working
    : with Photoshop elements 4.0. any help you can give would be great.

    Unfortunately low light situations require some trade offs. You can
    increase the light with a bunch of flood lamps, or if the room is small
    enough you could attempt to use a flash. If you use a flash you will
    probably want to either bounce the flash or use a diffuser (or both) to
    spread the flash illumination as evenly as possible.

    If you can't get enough additional illumination you must adjust the camera
    to compensate for the lower light levels. A larger ISO can do this to some
    extent (but each step up the ISO ladder tends to increase noise, just like
    faster film tended to have more pronounced grain). In addition you will
    probably have to use a slower shutter speed. The slower the speed the more
    sensitive the camera will be to any movement either of the subject or of
    the camera. At the shutter speeds required for relatively dark rooms you
    will increasingly need some form of stable support to keep the camera from
    moving, even a little bit. If you can come up with a stable support that
    can be created on site, fine. But for many of us a tripod is the first
    choice. Being a biker myself I can sympathize with the need to reduce what
    you are hauling around. But a mid weight tripod with a sholder strap
    (either made for, or improvised) will allow you to sling the tripod on
    your back for ease of transport on your bike. Then when metering the scene
    use either spot metering or center weighted (second choice) to measure the
    lighting conditions of a wall in the scene that is about the mid range of
    lighting in the room. Neither the brightest lit or the furthest in shadow.
    Avoid the windows when metering as this will inevidably cause the room to
    appear very dark, even on a grey rainy day outside. Just doing some
    off-the-top-of-my-head brainstorming gave me an idea. What about one of
    those chin-up bars that adjust and clamp into a door opening. Then drill a
    hole in the middle and attach a tripod ball head. With this you could
    clamp this support into almost any door (or even window) opening, at any
    height up to the height of the opening. You may have to stand on a chair
    to aim and set the camera if you set it very high in the door opening, but
    it would afford you a stable camera support that could be very easily
    moved from room to room. And being a single bar it should be easier to
    carry than a full tripod.

    Low light conditions tend to require more thought and probably equipment
    than more conducive photography conditions. But with more practice in
    recognizing how to adjust for conditions and finding a way to carry a few
    additional items of equipment you may find that much of this thought and
    planning will become nearly automatic.

    Good luck

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Nov 12, 2006
    #4
  5. Frankly

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Frankly wrote:
    > Hello Everyone.
    >
    > I have the cool pix 8400. I take a lot of indoor shots and sometimes i am
    > in dark and long apartments.
    > I did do some reading and understand I need to do more. I guess I am just
    > looking for people to talk to
    > to help me understand where i should concentrate my studies.
    > the 8400 as you know does not have anit shake for picture taking and
    > sometimes i like to hold the camera over my head. I have learned i can undo
    > some of this by switching to shutter speed priority but find
    > it hard to make the pictures in dark places look light. someone even said i
    > should try a shutter speed of 125 that just comes out way to dark. Today i
    > will be taking pictures using the tri pod but that does not allow me for the
    > hight i want and i ride a motorcycle so i would rather not have to take it
    > with me.
    > I want to make windows look as sunny as possible and long dark apartments
    > look light enough to see the details. I am also working with Photoshop
    > elements 4.0. any help you can give would be great.
    >
    > thank you
    >
    > John
    >
    >


    I am going to assume you are not using flash.
    First, if the walls are light colored, make sure you don't include them
    when you allow the camera to set its aperture and they will cause false
    readings for other objects.
    Much can be done with PS4, but the risk is of too much noise in the
    darker areas. On the other hand, if whites are 'blown out', there is
    NOTHING you can do to recover the data.
    Ron Hunter, Nov 12, 2006
    #5
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