Damn HP!!!

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Calvin Crumrine, Jul 26, 2004.

  1. Just had to throw out over $100 of HP ink cartridges due to expiration
    dates. No other reason, as far as I can tell the ink was still good but
    the printers wouldn't work with those cartridges.

    The worst part is that this won't be the last time-unless I get rid of
    those damned HP printers. (And from what I've heard that won't help-most
    printer manufacturers have taken this route to rip us off.)

    I mostly use the ink jets when I need to print in color-and I don't
    print in color a lot. I've learned 2 things over the years. First, when
    you run out of ink you'll do so when you're on a deadline. Second, if
    you're limited to a few local stores (like I am-I simply *can't* fly out
    at a moment's notice to buy an ink cartridge) then you can't count on
    them having the cartridges you need in stock-and that assumes that
    they're open when you run out (usually in the middle of the night).

    So I've learned to keep a spare cartridge 'on the shelf'-but those are
    the ones that I just threw out! Like I said, I don't print in color a
    lot and these last cartridges lasted longer than I expected-long enough
    for my spare cartridges to expire. Thank god I have several ink
    jets-enough that I could finish the job. But if I can't keep a spare
    cartidge on the shelf then what the hell can I do? Other than get rid of
    HP, that is.

    Suggestions?
    Calvin Crumrine, Jul 26, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Calvin Crumrine

    Michael-NC Guest

    Plenty of stuff on the net about this...

    http://makeashorterlink.com/?E3C0114E8

    http://www.interex.org/insidehp/articles/insidehp02.04.03.html
    End Around: Chicago Tribune reporter Jim Coates wrote that his HP printer
    quit on him one day, telling him that the black ink cartridge had expired. A
    spare ink cartridge yielded the same results. HP support told Coates that
    the printer software reads a date code on cartridges and blocks their use
    after a set length of time. He was told the block could not be bypassed. But
    it can: "The best way to defeat such a software scheme that uses a
    computer's internal clock to enforce software copy protection or check
    expiration dates is to set the computer to a past year when the days of the
    week for every month fall on the same dates as this year," Coates wrote. "Do
    this and your calendar continues to be accurate, and you fool the enforcers.
    The pattern of dates associated with specific days usually rotates every six
    or 11 years and always every 28 years. So, the 1997 calendar is exactly like
    the 2003 calendar, and so is the 1975 one. Set your clock/calendar to either
    year to fool the printer cartridge expiration-date check."

    From Google Groups:
    Two approaches will easily defeat almost any HP ink expiry date.
    1) Cycle 3 HP c501x ink cartridges (even epired cartridges work well).
    2) Remove the CMOS battery from the MPU board; short; reinstall.

    The first method entails momentarily replacing the existing expiring
    HP c5010 & c5011 officejet d145 ink cartridges with an existing ink
    cartridge (this second HP ink cartridge can be expired or not); then
    cycling the power on the Hewlett Packard Office Jet d145 all-in-one
    printer. Repeat with a third HP c5011 & c5010 ink cartridge (expired
    or not). Replace the original after the obligatory cycling of the
    power on the HP OfficeJet d145 all-in-one printer.

    That stuff about print heads being destroyed by running out of ink is
    pure unadulterated HP FUD (hey, he filled the ink - it never ran the
    ink dry so dry print heads is not of concern in this excellent ng
    thread).

    The second method entals repairing the HP Office Jet d145 printer by
    removing the restriction on date altogether. Simply disconnect the MPU
    board CMOS battery (just remove it from the clips momentarily); short
    the terminals of the MPU board battery connector (with the 120v power
    off, of course); then re-connect.

    The HP OfficeJet d145 boot-up sequence (which normally occurs only at
    the factory) will go through a series of questions such as:
    - What is the current date & time?
    (change it by a year or two but not three!)
    - How many sheets of paper for the B&W ink low-ink message?
    - How many sheets of paper for the color ink low-ink message?

    This proves HP is counting paper sheets - not ink drops or ink
    levels!.

    These methods have worked for thousands of successful HP printer
    homeowners to eliminate the Hewlett Packard illegal restriction on
    refilling HP printer ink cartridges. They will work for you too!

    TT




    "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Just had to throw out over $100 of HP ink cartridges due to expiration
    > dates. No other reason, as far as I can tell the ink was still good but
    > the printers wouldn't work with those cartridges.
    >
    > The worst part is that this won't be the last time-unless I get rid of
    > those damned HP printers. (And from what I've heard that won't help-most
    > printer manufacturers have taken this route to rip us off.)
    >
    > I mostly use the ink jets when I need to print in color-and I don't
    > print in color a lot. I've learned 2 things over the years. First, when
    > you run out of ink you'll do so when you're on a deadline. Second, if
    > you're limited to a few local stores (like I am-I simply *can't* fly out
    > at a moment's notice to buy an ink cartridge) then you can't count on
    > them having the cartridges you need in stock-and that assumes that
    > they're open when you run out (usually in the middle of the night).
    >
    > So I've learned to keep a spare cartridge 'on the shelf'-but those are
    > the ones that I just threw out! Like I said, I don't print in color a
    > lot and these last cartridges lasted longer than I expected-long enough
    > for my spare cartridges to expire. Thank god I have several ink
    > jets-enough that I could finish the job. But if I can't keep a spare
    > cartidge on the shelf then what the hell can I do? Other than get rid of
    > HP, that is.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    Michael-NC, Jul 26, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Calvin Crumrine

    Jerry G. Guest

    Does this problem also exist with the HP 930 series printers? I have a
    number of spare cartridges.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ==========================


    "Michael-NC" <> wrote in message
    news:5CZMc.212681$...
    Plenty of stuff on the net about this...

    http://makeashorterlink.com/?E3C0114E8

    http://www.interex.org/insidehp/articles/insidehp02.04.03.html
    End Around: Chicago Tribune reporter Jim Coates wrote that his HP printer
    quit on him one day, telling him that the black ink cartridge had expired. A
    spare ink cartridge yielded the same results. HP support told Coates that
    the printer software reads a date code on cartridges and blocks their use
    after a set length of time. He was told the block could not be bypassed. But
    it can: "The best way to defeat such a software scheme that uses a
    computer's internal clock to enforce software copy protection or check
    expiration dates is to set the computer to a past year when the days of the
    week for every month fall on the same dates as this year," Coates wrote. "Do
    this and your calendar continues to be accurate, and you fool the enforcers.
    The pattern of dates associated with specific days usually rotates every six
    or 11 years and always every 28 years. So, the 1997 calendar is exactly like
    the 2003 calendar, and so is the 1975 one. Set your clock/calendar to either
    year to fool the printer cartridge expiration-date check."

    From Google Groups:
    Two approaches will easily defeat almost any HP ink expiry date.
    1) Cycle 3 HP c501x ink cartridges (even epired cartridges work well).
    2) Remove the CMOS battery from the MPU board; short; reinstall.

    The first method entails momentarily replacing the existing expiring
    HP c5010 & c5011 officejet d145 ink cartridges with an existing ink
    cartridge (this second HP ink cartridge can be expired or not); then
    cycling the power on the Hewlett Packard Office Jet d145 all-in-one
    printer. Repeat with a third HP c5011 & c5010 ink cartridge (expired
    or not). Replace the original after the obligatory cycling of the
    power on the HP OfficeJet d145 all-in-one printer.

    That stuff about print heads being destroyed by running out of ink is
    pure unadulterated HP FUD (hey, he filled the ink - it never ran the
    ink dry so dry print heads is not of concern in this excellent ng
    thread).

    The second method entals repairing the HP Office Jet d145 printer by
    removing the restriction on date altogether. Simply disconnect the MPU
    board CMOS battery (just remove it from the clips momentarily); short
    the terminals of the MPU board battery connector (with the 120v power
    off, of course); then re-connect.

    The HP OfficeJet d145 boot-up sequence (which normally occurs only at
    the factory) will go through a series of questions such as:
    - What is the current date & time?
    (change it by a year or two but not three!)
    - How many sheets of paper for the B&W ink low-ink message?
    - How many sheets of paper for the color ink low-ink message?

    This proves HP is counting paper sheets - not ink drops or ink
    levels!.

    These methods have worked for thousands of successful HP printer
    homeowners to eliminate the Hewlett Packard illegal restriction on
    refilling HP printer ink cartridges. They will work for you too!

    TT




    "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Just had to throw out over $100 of HP ink cartridges due to expiration
    > dates. No other reason, as far as I can tell the ink was still good but
    > the printers wouldn't work with those cartridges.
    >
    > The worst part is that this won't be the last time-unless I get rid of
    > those damned HP printers. (And from what I've heard that won't help-most
    > printer manufacturers have taken this route to rip us off.)
    >
    > I mostly use the ink jets when I need to print in color-and I don't
    > print in color a lot. I've learned 2 things over the years. First, when
    > you run out of ink you'll do so when you're on a deadline. Second, if
    > you're limited to a few local stores (like I am-I simply *can't* fly out
    > at a moment's notice to buy an ink cartridge) then you can't count on
    > them having the cartridges you need in stock-and that assumes that
    > they're open when you run out (usually in the middle of the night).
    >
    > So I've learned to keep a spare cartridge 'on the shelf'-but those are
    > the ones that I just threw out! Like I said, I don't print in color a
    > lot and these last cartridges lasted longer than I expected-long enough
    > for my spare cartridges to expire. Thank god I have several ink
    > jets-enough that I could finish the job. But if I can't keep a spare
    > cartidge on the shelf then what the hell can I do? Other than get rid of
    > HP, that is.
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    Jerry G., Jul 27, 2004
    #3
  4. Calvin Crumrine

    Thor Guest

    "Jerry G." <> wrote in message
    news:ce5emp$grc$...
    > Does this problem also exist with the HP 930 series printers? I have a
    > number of spare cartridges.
    >


    I have a Photosmart 1215, and the black cart has been in there for well over
    a year. No expiration problems yet. Seems like it must be on some of the
    very newest of models. I had never heard of this issue prior to this thread.
    If that is what HP is doing, it is reprehensible, and I hope they get sued
    for it.
    Thor, Jul 27, 2004
    #4
  5. Thor wrote:

    > "Jerry G." <> wrote in message
    > news:ce5emp$grc$...
    >
    >>Does this problem also exist with the HP 930 series printers? I have a
    >>number of spare cartridges.
    >>

    >
    >
    > I have a Photosmart 1215, and the black cart has been in there for well over
    > a year. No expiration problems yet. Seems like it must be on some of the
    > very newest of models. I had never heard of this issue prior to this thread.
    > If that is what HP is doing, it is reprehensible, and I hope they get sued
    > for it.
    >
    >


    One of my printers is a Photosmart 1115-about 2 years old IIRC. The
    other is an Officejet 6110-a little over a year old IIRC. They use
    different cartridges, naturally, and exhibited different symptoms but
    both returned to normal operation after I installed a cartridge I'd just
    purchased. This time I really looked, both at the box before I purchased
    & at the cartridge when I installed it.

    I noticed on the box a 'best installed by' date with a limited warranty
    that was only good for 6 months after that date. This isn't real
    prominent but if you look for it, it's there.

    I also noticed several old cartridges still on the rack in the store.
    (In particular, there were about 30 HP 45 cartridges on the rack. 25 of
    them were dated July 2004. Others were dated as far back as November
    2003.) The 'expired' cartridges I had were purchased shortly after I
    bought the Officejet-about a year ago. Who knows how long they'd been in
    the store? I suspect that I got old stock. (A couple of the cartridges
    it's very likely-I got them on closeout when the local K-mart shut down.
    I knew at the time that they were hauling stuff out of the far corners
    of their warehouse, but never dreamed that the cartridges had an
    expiration date.)

    When I installed the cartridges I took a good look at them & noticed a
    date stamped on the cartridge itself. I no longer remember the exact
    date (and I'm not at my printer so I can't look) but it was sometime in
    2006 or 2007. Well over a year from the 'best installed by' date. So it
    appears that HP gives ample time to use up a cartridge-if it's new when
    you install it. My problem, I suspect (still no answer from HP) is that
    I got old stock & then left it on my shelf for over a year. The
    cartridges that didn't work had dates stamped on them in 2003 & early 2004.
    Calvin Crumrine, Jul 27, 2004
    #5
  6. Calvin Crumrine

    Michael-NC Guest

    "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thor wrote:
    >
    > > "Jerry G." <> wrote in message
    > > news:ce5emp$grc$...
    > >
    > >>Does this problem also exist with the HP 930 series printers? I have a
    > >>number of spare cartridges.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > I have a Photosmart 1215, and the black cart has been in there for well

    over
    > > a year. No expiration problems yet. Seems like it must be on some of the
    > > very newest of models. I had never heard of this issue prior to this

    thread.
    > > If that is what HP is doing, it is reprehensible, and I hope they get

    sued
    > > for it.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > One of my printers is a Photosmart 1115-about 2 years old IIRC. The
    > other is an Officejet 6110-a little over a year old IIRC. They use
    > different cartridges, naturally, and exhibited different symptoms but
    > both returned to normal operation after I installed a cartridge I'd just
    > purchased. This time I really looked, both at the box before I purchased
    > & at the cartridge when I installed it.
    >
    > I noticed on the box a 'best installed by' date with a limited warranty
    > that was only good for 6 months after that date. This isn't real
    > prominent but if you look for it, it's there.
    >
    > I also noticed several old cartridges still on the rack in the store.
    > (In particular, there were about 30 HP 45 cartridges on the rack. 25 of
    > them were dated July 2004. Others were dated as far back as November
    > 2003.) The 'expired' cartridges I had were purchased shortly after I
    > bought the Officejet-about a year ago. Who knows how long they'd been in
    > the store? I suspect that I got old stock. (A couple of the cartridges
    > it's very likely-I got them on closeout when the local K-mart shut down.
    > I knew at the time that they were hauling stuff out of the far corners
    > of their warehouse, but never dreamed that the cartridges had an
    > expiration date.)
    >
    > When I installed the cartridges I took a good look at them & noticed a
    > date stamped on the cartridge itself. I no longer remember the exact
    > date (and I'm not at my printer so I can't look) but it was sometime in
    > 2006 or 2007. Well over a year from the 'best installed by' date. So it
    > appears that HP gives ample time to use up a cartridge-if it's new when
    > you install it. My problem, I suspect (still no answer from HP) is that
    > I got old stock & then left it on my shelf for over a year. The
    > cartridges that didn't work had dates stamped on them in 2003 & early

    2004.

    You should have been able to use them. Did you call HP? I see vendors
    selling expired cartridges, guaranteeing they will work. Apparently, the
    date is burned into the cartridge when it is installed, regardless of the
    date???
    Michael-NC, Jul 27, 2004
    #6
  7. Michael-NC wrote:
    > "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Thor wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>"Jerry G." <> wrote in message
    >>>news:ce5emp$grc$...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Does this problem also exist with the HP 930 series printers? I have a
    >>>>number of spare cartridges.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I have a Photosmart 1215, and the black cart has been in there for well

    >
    > over
    >
    >>>a year. No expiration problems yet. Seems like it must be on some of the
    >>>very newest of models. I had never heard of this issue prior to this

    >
    > thread.
    >
    >>>If that is what HP is doing, it is reprehensible, and I hope they get

    >
    > sued
    >
    >>>for it.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>One of my printers is a Photosmart 1115-about 2 years old IIRC. The
    >>other is an Officejet 6110-a little over a year old IIRC. They use
    >>different cartridges, naturally, and exhibited different symptoms but
    >>both returned to normal operation after I installed a cartridge I'd just
    >>purchased. This time I really looked, both at the box before I purchased
    >>& at the cartridge when I installed it.
    >>
    >>I noticed on the box a 'best installed by' date with a limited warranty
    >>that was only good for 6 months after that date. This isn't real
    >>prominent but if you look for it, it's there.
    >>
    >>I also noticed several old cartridges still on the rack in the store.
    >>(In particular, there were about 30 HP 45 cartridges on the rack. 25 of
    >>them were dated July 2004. Others were dated as far back as November
    >>2003.) The 'expired' cartridges I had were purchased shortly after I
    >>bought the Officejet-about a year ago. Who knows how long they'd been in
    >>the store? I suspect that I got old stock. (A couple of the cartridges
    >>it's very likely-I got them on closeout when the local K-mart shut down.
    >>I knew at the time that they were hauling stuff out of the far corners
    >>of their warehouse, but never dreamed that the cartridges had an
    >>expiration date.)
    >>
    >>When I installed the cartridges I took a good look at them & noticed a
    >>date stamped on the cartridge itself. I no longer remember the exact
    >>date (and I'm not at my printer so I can't look) but it was sometime in
    >>2006 or 2007. Well over a year from the 'best installed by' date. So it
    >>appears that HP gives ample time to use up a cartridge-if it's new when
    >>you install it. My problem, I suspect (still no answer from HP) is that
    >>I got old stock & then left it on my shelf for over a year. The
    >>cartridges that didn't work had dates stamped on them in 2003 & early

    >
    > 2004.
    >
    > You should have been able to use them. Did you call HP? I see vendors
    > selling expired cartridges, guaranteeing they will work. Apparently, the
    > date is burned into the cartridge when it is installed, regardless of the
    > date???
    >
    >
    >

    Sent an email to HP, no reply yet (except the auto-reply "we've received
    your message, we care about you-chump")

    Coincidences are always possible, but the circumstances provide prima
    facie proof that the dates (either manufacturing or expiration-just two
    ends of the same range) are in the cartridge before it's installed.

    Evidence: Two different HP printers using 2 different series of
    cartridges. Both exhibited problems with unused cartridges that were
    date stamped prior to the installation date. Both worked fine with new
    cartridges that were date stamped in the future.

    I'll admit that my conclusions would be firmer if I had more samples (if
    I remember my statistics class the minimum sample universe from which
    you can draw statistically significant conclusions is something like 30)
    but I'm not inclined to spend my money trying to prove this. If HP
    denies what I see for myself then I'll just go elsewhere. Bye-bye, HP.
    Calvin Crumrine, Jul 28, 2004
    #7
  8. Calvin Crumrine

    Michael-NC Guest

    "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Michael-NC wrote:
    > > "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >
    > >>Thor wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>"Jerry G." <> wrote in message
    > >>>news:ce5emp$grc$...
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>Does this problem also exist with the HP 930 series printers? I have

    a
    > >>>>number of spare cartridges.
    > >>>>
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>I have a Photosmart 1215, and the black cart has been in there for well

    > >
    > > over
    > >
    > >>>a year. No expiration problems yet. Seems like it must be on some of

    the
    > >>>very newest of models. I had never heard of this issue prior to this

    > >
    > > thread.
    > >
    > >>>If that is what HP is doing, it is reprehensible, and I hope they get

    > >
    > > sued
    > >
    > >>>for it.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>One of my printers is a Photosmart 1115-about 2 years old IIRC. The
    > >>other is an Officejet 6110-a little over a year old IIRC. They use
    > >>different cartridges, naturally, and exhibited different symptoms but
    > >>both returned to normal operation after I installed a cartridge I'd just
    > >>purchased. This time I really looked, both at the box before I purchased
    > >>& at the cartridge when I installed it.
    > >>
    > >>I noticed on the box a 'best installed by' date with a limited warranty
    > >>that was only good for 6 months after that date. This isn't real
    > >>prominent but if you look for it, it's there.
    > >>
    > >>I also noticed several old cartridges still on the rack in the store.
    > >>(In particular, there were about 30 HP 45 cartridges on the rack. 25 of
    > >>them were dated July 2004. Others were dated as far back as November
    > >>2003.) The 'expired' cartridges I had were purchased shortly after I
    > >>bought the Officejet-about a year ago. Who knows how long they'd been in
    > >>the store? I suspect that I got old stock. (A couple of the cartridges
    > >>it's very likely-I got them on closeout when the local K-mart shut down.
    > >>I knew at the time that they were hauling stuff out of the far corners
    > >>of their warehouse, but never dreamed that the cartridges had an
    > >>expiration date.)
    > >>
    > >>When I installed the cartridges I took a good look at them & noticed a
    > >>date stamped on the cartridge itself. I no longer remember the exact
    > >>date (and I'm not at my printer so I can't look) but it was sometime in
    > >>2006 or 2007. Well over a year from the 'best installed by' date. So it
    > >>appears that HP gives ample time to use up a cartridge-if it's new when
    > >>you install it. My problem, I suspect (still no answer from HP) is that
    > >>I got old stock & then left it on my shelf for over a year. The
    > >>cartridges that didn't work had dates stamped on them in 2003 & early

    > >
    > > 2004.
    > >
    > > You should have been able to use them. Did you call HP? I see vendors
    > > selling expired cartridges, guaranteeing they will work. Apparently, the
    > > date is burned into the cartridge when it is installed, regardless of

    the
    > > date???
    > >
    > >
    > >

    > Sent an email to HP, no reply yet (except the auto-reply "we've received
    > your message, we care about you-chump")
    >
    > Coincidences are always possible, but the circumstances provide prima
    > facie proof that the dates (either manufacturing or expiration-just two
    > ends of the same range) are in the cartridge before it's installed.
    >
    > Evidence: Two different HP printers using 2 different series of
    > cartridges. Both exhibited problems with unused cartridges that were
    > date stamped prior to the installation date. Both worked fine with new
    > cartridges that were date stamped in the future.
    >
    > I'll admit that my conclusions would be firmer if I had more samples (if
    > I remember my statistics class the minimum sample universe from which
    > you can draw statistically significant conclusions is something like 30)
    > but I'm not inclined to spend my money trying to prove this. If HP
    > denies what I see for myself then I'll just go elsewhere. Bye-bye, HP.


    I don't blame you for that one bit. Apparently this expiration scheme is
    targeted at business class printers but it's up to individual consumers to
    decide whether they support such practices. I certainly wouldn't purchase a
    HP product after hearing about this fiasco. Making someone go to the extreme
    of setting back a bios clock in order to use their printer with a perfectly
    fine, albeit "expired" cartridge to avoid the purchase of a new, overpriced
    cartridge is the height of hubris.
    Michael-NC, Jul 28, 2004
    #8
  9. Michael-NC wrote:
    > "Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Michael-NC wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Calvin Crumrine" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Thor wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>"Jerry G." <> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:ce5emp$grc$...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Does this problem also exist with the HP 930 series printers? I have

    >
    > a
    >
    >>>>>>number of spare cartridges.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I have a Photosmart 1215, and the black cart has been in there for well
    >>>
    >>>over
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>a year. No expiration problems yet. Seems like it must be on some of

    >
    > the
    >
    >>>>>very newest of models. I had never heard of this issue prior to this
    >>>
    >>>thread.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>If that is what HP is doing, it is reprehensible, and I hope they get
    >>>
    >>>sued
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>for it.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>One of my printers is a Photosmart 1115-about 2 years old IIRC. The
    >>>>other is an Officejet 6110-a little over a year old IIRC. They use
    >>>>different cartridges, naturally, and exhibited different symptoms but
    >>>>both returned to normal operation after I installed a cartridge I'd just
    >>>>purchased. This time I really looked, both at the box before I purchased
    >>>>& at the cartridge when I installed it.
    >>>>
    >>>>I noticed on the box a 'best installed by' date with a limited warranty
    >>>>that was only good for 6 months after that date. This isn't real
    >>>>prominent but if you look for it, it's there.
    >>>>
    >>>>I also noticed several old cartridges still on the rack in the store.
    >>>>(In particular, there were about 30 HP 45 cartridges on the rack. 25 of
    >>>>them were dated July 2004. Others were dated as far back as November
    >>>>2003.) The 'expired' cartridges I had were purchased shortly after I
    >>>>bought the Officejet-about a year ago. Who knows how long they'd been in
    >>>>the store? I suspect that I got old stock. (A couple of the cartridges
    >>>>it's very likely-I got them on closeout when the local K-mart shut down.
    >>>>I knew at the time that they were hauling stuff out of the far corners
    >>>>of their warehouse, but never dreamed that the cartridges had an
    >>>>expiration date.)
    >>>>
    >>>>When I installed the cartridges I took a good look at them & noticed a
    >>>>date stamped on the cartridge itself. I no longer remember the exact
    >>>>date (and I'm not at my printer so I can't look) but it was sometime in
    >>>>2006 or 2007. Well over a year from the 'best installed by' date. So it
    >>>>appears that HP gives ample time to use up a cartridge-if it's new when
    >>>>you install it. My problem, I suspect (still no answer from HP) is that
    >>>>I got old stock & then left it on my shelf for over a year. The
    >>>>cartridges that didn't work had dates stamped on them in 2003 & early
    >>>
    >>>2004.
    >>>
    >>>You should have been able to use them. Did you call HP? I see vendors
    >>>selling expired cartridges, guaranteeing they will work. Apparently, the
    >>>date is burned into the cartridge when it is installed, regardless of

    >
    > the
    >
    >>>date???
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>Sent an email to HP, no reply yet (except the auto-reply "we've received
    >>your message, we care about you-chump")
    >>
    >>Coincidences are always possible, but the circumstances provide prima
    >>facie proof that the dates (either manufacturing or expiration-just two
    >>ends of the same range) are in the cartridge before it's installed.
    >>
    >>Evidence: Two different HP printers using 2 different series of
    >>cartridges. Both exhibited problems with unused cartridges that were
    >>date stamped prior to the installation date. Both worked fine with new
    >>cartridges that were date stamped in the future.
    >>
    >>I'll admit that my conclusions would be firmer if I had more samples (if
    >>I remember my statistics class the minimum sample universe from which
    >>you can draw statistically significant conclusions is something like 30)
    >>but I'm not inclined to spend my money trying to prove this. If HP
    >>denies what I see for myself then I'll just go elsewhere. Bye-bye, HP.

    >
    >
    > I don't blame you for that one bit. Apparently this expiration scheme is
    > targeted at business class printers but it's up to individual consumers to
    > decide whether they support such practices. I certainly wouldn't purchase a
    > HP product after hearing about this fiasco. Making someone go to the extreme
    > of setting back a bios clock in order to use their printer with a perfectly
    > fine, albeit "expired" cartridge to avoid the purchase of a new, overpriced
    > cartridge is the height of hubris.
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Just ran across this article
    http://www.alotofthings.com/inkjetinformation/TheNewInkJetMarketplace.htm
    Although the cartridges mentioned aren't the same as I have the article
    does state definitely that some HP (and Lexmark) cartridges have the
    expiration dates burned in at time of manufacture, not installation.

    Still no reply from HP.
    Calvin Crumrine, Jul 30, 2004
    #9
  10. > Just ran across this article
    >

    http://www.alotofthings.com/inkjetinformation/TheNewInkJetMarketplace.htm
    > some HP (and Lexmark) cartridges have the expiration dates burned in
    > at the time of manufacture, not the time of installation.


    I think there might be two dates 'burned' into the HP 14 c5010a ink
    cartridges.
    1. FINAL EXPIRATION DATE (dies 4.5 years from date of manufacture)
    2. IN-SERVICE DATE (dies 2.5 years from date of initial installation)
    The "actual" HP14 ink cartrdige expiry date is the first of these two!

    I think the 4.5 year expiry date is burned in at manufacture time;
    I think the 30-month expiry date is burned in when you install it.

    I don't think HP burns in a serial number;
    I think it burns the actual date!

    Witness these facts:
    Today, Christmas Eve, my color cartridge said it was out of ink.
    When I put a second cartridge in, it said the SAME THING even though
    the cartridge was full of OEM ink (it was only used ONCE on the day I
    bought it). Same with a third OEM full HP 14 color ink cartridge.

    I infer that the 30-months contiguous service is burned into the smart
    chip at the time of install.

    Interesting, since all three cartridges were put in service on the same
    day in the same machine, and all three are saying "out of ink" even
    though only one can possibly be out of ink, I suspect the date burned
    into each cartridge is the SAME DATE (and not some unique serial
    number).

    That is, I'm surmising, the HP D145 printer is seeing the second and
    third ink cartridges EXACTLY the same as the first (it appears). If I
    had only put them in service on a DIFFERENT DATE, then perhaps it would
    recognize the second and third cartridges as different.

    In summary, I think the HP D145 printer is assuming the three ink
    cartridges are one and the same because all the HP ojd145 "sees" is
    the same date burned into the smart chip on all three (which were put
    in initial service in the same machine on that same date months ago).
    Does this make any sense?
    Orak Listalavostok, Dec 25, 2004
    #10
  11. Calvin Crumrine

    HF Guest

    Not really !!!
    "Orak Listalavostok" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > Just ran across this article
    > >

    > http://www.alotofthings.com/inkjetinformation/TheNewInkJetMarketplace.htm
    > > some HP (and Lexmark) cartridges have the expiration dates burned in
    > > at the time of manufacture, not the time of installation.

    >
    > I think there might be two dates 'burned' into the HP 14 c5010a ink
    > cartridges.
    > 1. FINAL EXPIRATION DATE (dies 4.5 years from date of manufacture)
    > 2. IN-SERVICE DATE (dies 2.5 years from date of initial installation)
    > The "actual" HP14 ink cartrdige expiry date is the first of these two!
    >
    > I think the 4.5 year expiry date is burned in at manufacture time;
    > I think the 30-month expiry date is burned in when you install it.
    >
    > I don't think HP burns in a serial number;
    > I think it burns the actual date!
    >
    > Witness these facts:
    > Today, Christmas Eve, my color cartridge said it was out of ink.
    > When I put a second cartridge in, it said the SAME THING even though
    > the cartridge was full of OEM ink (it was only used ONCE on the day I
    > bought it). Same with a third OEM full HP 14 color ink cartridge.
    >
    > I infer that the 30-months contiguous service is burned into the smart
    > chip at the time of install.
    >
    > Interesting, since all three cartridges were put in service on the same
    > day in the same machine, and all three are saying "out of ink" even
    > though only one can possibly be out of ink, I suspect the date burned
    > into each cartridge is the SAME DATE (and not some unique serial
    > number).
    >
    > That is, I'm surmising, the HP D145 printer is seeing the second and
    > third ink cartridges EXACTLY the same as the first (it appears). If I
    > had only put them in service on a DIFFERENT DATE, then perhaps it would
    > recognize the second and third cartridges as different.
    >
    > In summary, I think the HP D145 printer is assuming the three ink
    > cartridges are one and the same because all the HP ojd145 "sees" is
    > the same date burned into the smart chip on all three (which were put
    > in initial service in the same machine on that same date months ago).
    > Does this make any sense?
    >
    HF, Dec 25, 2004
    #11
  12. Before you burst a blood vessel (which might solve the problem of the
    magenta ink ;-)) I think HP may have a policy of replacing outdated
    full or nearly full cartridges.

    I know someone here will have your answer, if you are patient. I would
    not remove the battery, especially f it is precarious, until at least
    hearing from someone who knows HP's policy.

    Art



    Orak Listalavostok wrote:

    >>Just ran across this article
    >>

    >
    > http://www.alotofthings.com/inkjetinformation/TheNewInkJetMarketplace.htm
    >
    >>some HP (and Lexmark) cartridges have the expiration dates burned in
    >>at the time of manufacture, not the time of installation.

    >
    >
    > I think there might be two dates 'burned' into the HP 14 c5010a ink
    > cartridges.
    > 1. FINAL EXPIRATION DATE (dies 4.5 years from date of manufacture)
    > 2. IN-SERVICE DATE (dies 2.5 years from date of initial installation)
    > The "actual" HP14 ink cartrdige expiry date is the first of these two!
    >
    > I think the 4.5 year expiry date is burned in at manufacture time;
    > I think the 30-month expiry date is burned in when you install it.
    >
    > I don't think HP burns in a serial number;
    > I think it burns the actual date!
    >
    > Witness these facts:
    > Today, Christmas Eve, my color cartridge said it was out of ink.
    > When I put a second cartridge in, it said the SAME THING even though
    > the cartridge was full of OEM ink (it was only used ONCE on the day I
    > bought it). Same with a third OEM full HP 14 color ink cartridge.
    >
    > I infer that the 30-months contiguous service is burned into the smart
    > chip at the time of install.
    >
    > Interesting, since all three cartridges were put in service on the same
    > day in the same machine, and all three are saying "out of ink" even
    > though only one can possibly be out of ink, I suspect the date burned
    > into each cartridge is the SAME DATE (and not some unique serial
    > number).
    >
    > That is, I'm surmising, the HP D145 printer is seeing the second and
    > third ink cartridges EXACTLY the same as the first (it appears). If I
    > had only put them in service on a DIFFERENT DATE, then perhaps it would
    > recognize the second and third cartridges as different.
    >
    > In summary, I think the HP D145 printer is assuming the three ink
    > cartridges are one and the same because all the HP ojd145 "sees" is
    > the same date burned into the smart chip on all three (which were put
    > in initial service in the same machine on that same date months ago).
    > Does this make any sense?
    >
    Arthur Entlich, Dec 25, 2004
    #12
  13. I should make it clear I did NOT say the "darn HP" header.
    I was merely responding to a header I found in GOOGLE groups
    (i.e., nntp on the web). The response looks like it came from me
    because the original dozen or more prior activity for some reason
    doesn't show up.

    So, I'm not bursting a blood vessel although I agree it might
    re-fill my magenta tanks (it's cold, so maybe the cyan too) :)

    I'm a scientist so I would really love to figure out WHY this
    happened.

    Wierdly, after replacing the battery last night (Christmas eve),
    nothing changed; but this morning I received an unexpected
    Christmas gift from HP. One of the three cartridges now works!

    I immediately refilled it (so as to not damage the separate
    print heads). Here is all I know.

    - 12 hours ago, all three cartridges failed to print.
    - I removed the battery & finished wrapping the kid's presents
    - More than an hour later, I put the battery back.
    - Nothing seemed to have changed; it still would not print.
    - However, accidentally, I had forgotten to test the ORIGINAL ink
    - Today, at 7am the kids awoke to hand-written laels
    - Later, I tried printing (LCD now-dated JAN 00 00 00:00a)
    - The completely full HP 14 C1050a ink said "Color Ink Out"
    - However ... a strange thing happened next ...
    - I found the original HP14 tri-color accidentally set aside
    - It printed!
    - Huh? Surprised, I immediatly took it out of service
    - As it was indeed low on cyan ink
    - I flipped the cartridge upside down & refilled all three
    - I added 1 ml or so (assuming 15 drops per milliliter) slowly
    - This originally "Color Ink Out" cartridge now prints better than
    before!
    - I guess it's the high quality ink that replaces the HP OEM ink
    - Either way, I am desperately trying to figure out WHY this happens?

    My hypothesis (stated to see if it stands the test of scrutiny):
    - The 4.5 year expiry date is burned into the HP14 at time of
    manufacture
    - The 30-month service date is burned into the HP14 at time of 1st
    service
    - The low-ink condition is saved (somehow) in the printer computer
    - Note this is not the Windows computer but the OJ d145 computer
    - Somehow, I needed to change TWO variables (I am guessing)
    - The first variable was removing the CMOS battery
    - Somehow, the second variable was chaning the date by 12 hours
    - This last part doesn't make sense so I ask HP printing experts:

    QUESTION:
    When the "color ink out" message appears, where is that data stored?"
    Orak Listalavostok, Dec 25, 2004
    #13
  14. Calvin Crumrine

    behappy Guest

    I also heard there is a device that can reset the smartchip cartridge. This
    can probably be found through the ink cartridge refilling kit vendors.

    "Arthur Entlich" <> wrote in message
    news:Sefzd.21302$KO5.5822@clgrps13...
    > Before you burst a blood vessel (which might solve the problem of the
    > magenta ink ;-)) I think HP may have a policy of replacing outdated full
    > or nearly full cartridges.
    >
    > I know someone here will have your answer, if you are patient. I would
    > not remove the battery, especially f it is precarious, until at least
    > hearing from someone who knows HP's policy.
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    >
    > Orak Listalavostok wrote:
    >
    >>>Just ran across this article
    >>>

    >>
    >> http://www.alotofthings.com/inkjetinformation/TheNewInkJetMarketplace.htm
    >>
    >>>some HP (and Lexmark) cartridges have the expiration dates burned in
    >>>at the time of manufacture, not the time of installation.

    >>
    >>
    >> I think there might be two dates 'burned' into the HP 14 c5010a ink
    >> cartridges.
    >> 1. FINAL EXPIRATION DATE (dies 4.5 years from date of manufacture)
    >> 2. IN-SERVICE DATE (dies 2.5 years from date of initial installation)
    >> The "actual" HP14 ink cartrdige expiry date is the first of these two!
    >>
    >> I think the 4.5 year expiry date is burned in at manufacture time;
    >> I think the 30-month expiry date is burned in when you install it.
    >>
    >> I don't think HP burns in a serial number;
    >> I think it burns the actual date!
    >>
    >> Witness these facts:
    >> Today, Christmas Eve, my color cartridge said it was out of ink.
    >> When I put a second cartridge in, it said the SAME THING even though
    >> the cartridge was full of OEM ink (it was only used ONCE on the day I
    >> bought it). Same with a third OEM full HP 14 color ink cartridge.
    >>
    >> I infer that the 30-months contiguous service is burned into the smart
    >> chip at the time of install.
    >>
    >> Interesting, since all three cartridges were put in service on the same
    >> day in the same machine, and all three are saying "out of ink" even
    >> though only one can possibly be out of ink, I suspect the date burned
    >> into each cartridge is the SAME DATE (and not some unique serial
    >> number).
    >>
    >> That is, I'm surmising, the HP D145 printer is seeing the second and
    >> third ink cartridges EXACTLY the same as the first (it appears). If I
    >> had only put them in service on a DIFFERENT DATE, then perhaps it would
    >> recognize the second and third cartridges as different.
    >>
    >> In summary, I think the HP D145 printer is assuming the three ink
    >> cartridges are one and the same because all the HP ojd145 "sees" is
    >> the same date burned into the smart chip on all three (which were put
    >> in initial service in the same machine on that same date months ago).
    >> Does this make any sense?
    >>

    >
    behappy, Dec 26, 2004
    #14
  15. Orak Listalavostok wrote:
    > The unexplained HP engineering is why did three HP14 c5010a ink
    > tanks (all of which were placed in service on the same date with
    > all but one of which were immediately removed from service) report
    > "COLOR INK OUT" (even when 2 of the 3 were full of HP OEM ink!)?


    .... twas the night before Christmas ... my HP ink level sank ...
    .... not a printer was printing ... nary one of 3 tanks ...

    The good news:
    - We're back printing beautifully (better than before) scores of prints
    - Using (strangely) the original HP14 c5010a tri-color cartridge
    - Which previously exhibited the correct "COLOR INK OUT" message!

    The bad news:
    - I have no idea what particular event "cleared" the HP "memory"

    The lessons learned:
    - Switching the three cartridges Dec 24 had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
    - Filling the one empty cartridge also had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
    - Removing the CR2032 3V CMOS battery had no immediate efect ...

    The day after:
    - Yet, about 12 hours later (on Christmas day)
    - The completely full cartridge was removed ...
    - And then replaced with the original empty cartridge ...

    And it printed without error!
    After subsequent refilling ... the original PRINTER INK OUT HP14
    tri-color ink cartridge is printing beautifully vibrant photos even
    after scores of sheets of paper (and multiple refills).

    I guess it's the first Christmas present from HP to all of us.
    I can't explain it; if you can - please do!

    Orak Listalavostok
    Orak Listalavostok, Dec 26, 2004
    #15
  16. Without "being there", I am going to suggest there was a dirty contact
    somewhere, that once the system read a low ink level, the other
    cartridges did not register to remedy because that contact was not
    getting new data from the new cartridges.

    I suspect the contact got renewed once enough cartridges were run by it
    during the testing process, and then they began to work. Possibly, the
    other two might also work now.

    However, although I don't know enough about HP printers, they might have
    a problem similar to that which can crop up on Epsons with the Inteledge
    chip. Occasionally, the printer will shut down waiting a replacement
    cartridge due to an empty tank... with many Epson they use separate ink
    tanks for each color. A person would replace the necessary color, but
    due to a mess up in process, the printer would not acknowledge the new
    cartridge (likely due to a dirty contact, or other similar problem).
    When this happens with the Epson, if you then shut the printer down, it
    will write the level of the last known cartridge to the chip on the new
    one, and therefore deeming the new cartridge as "empty" also. This
    cartridge is then read as empty unless the chip is reset with an
    external or software resetting device, which many people do not own.

    I am unsure if HP printers can create the same scenario or not.


    Art

    Orak Listalavostok wrote:

    > Orak Listalavostok wrote:
    >
    >>The unexplained HP engineering is why did three HP14 c5010a ink
    >>tanks (all of which were placed in service on the same date with
    >>all but one of which were immediately removed from service) report
    >>"COLOR INK OUT" (even when 2 of the 3 were full of HP OEM ink!)?

    >
    >
    > ... twas the night before Christmas ... my HP ink level sank ...
    > ... not a printer was printing ... nary one of 3 tanks ...
    >
    > The good news:
    > - We're back printing beautifully (better than before) scores of prints
    > - Using (strangely) the original HP14 c5010a tri-color cartridge
    > - Which previously exhibited the correct "COLOR INK OUT" message!
    >
    > The bad news:
    > - I have no idea what particular event "cleared" the HP "memory"
    >
    > The lessons learned:
    > - Switching the three cartridges Dec 24 had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
    > - Filling the one empty cartridge also had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
    > - Removing the CR2032 3V CMOS battery had no immediate efect ...
    >
    > The day after:
    > - Yet, about 12 hours later (on Christmas day)
    > - The completely full cartridge was removed ...
    > - And then replaced with the original empty cartridge ...
    >
    > And it printed without error!
    > After subsequent refilling ... the original PRINTER INK OUT HP14
    > tri-color ink cartridge is printing beautifully vibrant photos even
    > after scores of sheets of paper (and multiple refills).
    >
    > I guess it's the first Christmas present from HP to all of us.
    > I can't explain it; if you can - please do!
    >
    > Orak Listalavostok
    >
    Arthur Entlich, Dec 26, 2004
    #16
  17. Calvin Crumrine

    Robert Baer Guest

    Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >
    > Without "being there", I am going to suggest there was a dirty contact
    > somewhere, that once the system read a low ink level, the other
    > cartridges did not register to remedy because that contact was not
    > getting new data from the new cartridges.
    >
    > I suspect the contact got renewed once enough cartridges were run by it
    > during the testing process, and then they began to work. Possibly, the
    > other two might also work now.
    >
    > However, although I don't know enough about HP printers, they might have
    > a problem similar to that which can crop up on Epsons with the Inteledge
    > chip. Occasionally, the printer will shut down waiting a replacement
    > cartridge due to an empty tank... with many Epson they use separate ink
    > tanks for each color. A person would replace the necessary color, but
    > due to a mess up in process, the printer would not acknowledge the new
    > cartridge (likely due to a dirty contact, or other similar problem).
    > When this happens with the Epson, if you then shut the printer down, it
    > will write the level of the last known cartridge to the chip on the new
    > one, and therefore deeming the new cartridge as "empty" also. This
    > cartridge is then read as empty unless the chip is reset with an
    > external or software resetting device, which many people do not own.
    >
    > I am unsure if HP printers can create the same scenario or not.
    >
    > Art
    >
    > Orak Listalavostok wrote:
    >
    > > Orak Listalavostok wrote:
    > >
    > >>The unexplained HP engineering is why did three HP14 c5010a ink
    > >>tanks (all of which were placed in service on the same date with
    > >>all but one of which were immediately removed from service) report
    > >>"COLOR INK OUT" (even when 2 of the 3 were full of HP OEM ink!)?

    > >
    > >
    > > ... twas the night before Christmas ... my HP ink level sank ...
    > > ... not a printer was printing ... nary one of 3 tanks ...
    > >
    > > The good news:
    > > - We're back printing beautifully (better than before) scores of prints
    > > - Using (strangely) the original HP14 c5010a tri-color cartridge
    > > - Which previously exhibited the correct "COLOR INK OUT" message!
    > >
    > > The bad news:
    > > - I have no idea what particular event "cleared" the HP "memory"
    > >
    > > The lessons learned:
    > > - Switching the three cartridges Dec 24 had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
    > > - Filling the one empty cartridge also had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
    > > - Removing the CR2032 3V CMOS battery had no immediate efect ...
    > >
    > > The day after:
    > > - Yet, about 12 hours later (on Christmas day)
    > > - The completely full cartridge was removed ...
    > > - And then replaced with the original empty cartridge ...
    > >
    > > And it printed without error!
    > > After subsequent refilling ... the original PRINTER INK OUT HP14
    > > tri-color ink cartridge is printing beautifully vibrant photos even
    > > after scores of sheets of paper (and multiple refills).
    > >
    > > I guess it's the first Christmas present from HP to all of us.
    > > I can't explain it; if you can - please do!
    > >
    > > Orak Listalavostok
    > >


    It is not easy to mess up a *gold* contact...
    Robert Baer, Dec 27, 2004
    #17
  18. Calvin Crumrine

    Sharon Smith Guest

    "Arthur Entlich" <> wrote in message
    news:IUxzd.28542$dv1.27080@edtnps89...
    > I suspect the contact got renewed once enough cartridges were run by it
    > during the testing process, and then they began to work. Possibly, the
    > other two might also work now.
    >
    > Occasionally, the printer will shut down waiting a replacement cartridge
    > due to an empty tank... with many Epson they use separate ink tanks for
    > each color. A person would replace the necessary color, but due to a mess
    > up in process, the printer would not acknowledge the new cartridge (likely
    > due to a dirty contact, or other similar problem). When this happens with
    > the Epson, if you then shut the printer down, it will write the level of
    > the last known cartridge to the chip on the new one, and therefore deeming
    > the new cartridge as "empty" also. This cartridge is then read as empty
    > unless the chip is reset with an external or software resetting device,
    > which many people do not own.


    This sounds like what happened to his HP office jet.
    I'm guessing the HP printer's COPPER (not gold!) contacts are dirty.

    Best to get some sandpaper of a decent grit, say 300 grit, and scrape
    down the contacts in both the printer and on the cartridge until they lose
    their copper color and turn a metalic gray color.

    This is what is recommended on the HP site anyway.
    Sharon Smith, Dec 28, 2004
    #18
  19. Calvin Crumrine

    Robert Baer Guest

    Sharon Smith wrote:
    >
    > "Arthur Entlich" <> wrote in message
    > news:IUxzd.28542$dv1.27080@edtnps89...
    > > I suspect the contact got renewed once enough cartridges were run by it
    > > during the testing process, and then they began to work. Possibly, the
    > > other two might also work now.
    > >
    > > Occasionally, the printer will shut down waiting a replacement cartridge
    > > due to an empty tank... with many Epson they use separate ink tanks for
    > > each color. A person would replace the necessary color, but due to a mess
    > > up in process, the printer would not acknowledge the new cartridge (likely
    > > due to a dirty contact, or other similar problem). When this happens with
    > > the Epson, if you then shut the printer down, it will write the level of
    > > the last known cartridge to the chip on the new one, and therefore deeming
    > > the new cartridge as "empty" also. This cartridge is then read as empty
    > > unless the chip is reset with an external or software resetting device,
    > > which many people do not own.

    >
    > This sounds like what happened to his HP office jet.
    > I'm guessing the HP printer's COPPER (not gold!) contacts are dirty.
    >
    > Best to get some sandpaper of a decent grit, say 300 grit, and scrape
    > down the contacts in both the printer and on the cartridge until they lose
    > their copper color and turn a metalic gray color.
    >
    > This is what is recommended on the HP site anyway.


    All of the HP, Lexmart, Cannon and Epson inkjet cartridges that i have
    had gold contacts.
    Copper can get a rather non-conductive oxide and/or sulfide film
    rather fast in some areas.
    If you can easily sandpaper off that color, it ain't copper; no
    manufacturer would plate a thin film of copper onto any other metal -
    but they would plate a thin film of gold.
    Copper has a "reddish" color (look at a new uncirculated penny for
    reference), and gold has a "yellowish" color (look at a 24 carat gold
    coin, like a standing liberty or a maple leaf for reference).

    I would suggest that you do some research.
    Robert Baer, Dec 28, 2004
    #19
  20. Let's just say it is LESS easy. Epson uses gold plated contacts for
    their cartridge contacts as well, and they still occasionally have problems.

    As I stated, I wasn't there, so I'm guessing. I'm assuming the incident
    was accurately reported, and I can't think of a good reason for a
    cartridge with a head built in would have a expiration date that would
    shut down the printer.

    It's always possible there was another malfunction of some sort. Not
    every incident can be explained logically in lock-step.

    Art


    Robert Baer wrote:
    >
    > It is not easy to mess up a *gold* contact...
    Arthur Entlich, Dec 28, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Jukka Hellen

    Why is my Mozilla so damn slow?

    Jukka Hellen, Nov 26, 2003, in forum: Firefox
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,258
    dantu
    Nov 27, 2003
  2. John Smith

    damn loop

    John Smith, Mar 14, 2005, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    3,155
  3. Kendal Emery

    Damn Virus People

    Kendal Emery, Sep 19, 2003, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    572
    Gary - US
    Sep 22, 2003
  4. mtotten

    Damn Class Action Laws Suits Anyway!!!

    mtotten, Jan 26, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    545
    Harrison
    Jan 26, 2004
  5. David Dean

    Dead... the damn thing's dead...

    David Dean, Jan 28, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    562
Loading...

Share This Page