daisy-chain routers?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Shawn, Feb 13, 2004.

  1. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    Is it possible to plug a router's uplink into the port of another
    router? I wish to use a wireless router and a wired router at the same
    time. Thanks.

    Shawn
     
    Shawn, Feb 13, 2004
    #1
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  2. Shawn

    DeMoN LaG Guest

    Shawn <> wrote in news::

    > Is it possible to plug a router's uplink into the port of another
    > router? I wish to use a wireless router and a wired router at the same
    > time. Thanks.


    Yes, plug uplink to regular port. Disable things like DHCP on all but one
    of the routers, or else you could get conflicts.

    --
    AIM: FrznFoodClerk
    email: de_on-lag@co_cast.net (_ = m)
    website: under construction
    Need a technician in the south Jersey area?
    email/IM for rates/services
     
    DeMoN LaG, Feb 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. Shawn

    Sean V. Guest

    Yes, it's possible. Just set the gateway of the second router to the IP
    address of the first router. Everything else should be set up as DHCP, so
    everything else should work automatically.

    Sean

    "Shawn" <> wrote in message news:...
    > Is it possible to plug a router's uplink into the port of another
    > router? I wish to use a wireless router and a wired router at the same
    > time. Thanks.
    >
    > Shawn
    >
     
    Sean V., Feb 13, 2004
    #3
  4. Shawn

    Sean V. Guest

    I second this suggestion. I forgot to mention that in my own reply.

    Sean

    "DeMoN LaG" <n@a> wrote in message
    news:Xns948DE729056C9Wobbly@216.168.3.30...
    > Shawn <> wrote in news::
    >
    > > Is it possible to plug a router's uplink into the port of another
    > > router? I wish to use a wireless router and a wired router at the same
    > > time. Thanks.

    >
    > Yes, plug uplink to regular port. Disable things like DHCP on all but one
    > of the routers, or else you could get conflicts.
    >
    > --
    > AIM: FrznFoodClerk
    > email: de_on-lag@co_cast.net (_ = m)
    > website: under construction
    > Need a technician in the south Jersey area?
    > email/IM for rates/services
     
    Sean V., Feb 13, 2004
    #4
  5. Shawn

    Steve Guest

    "Shawn" <> wrote in message news:...
    > Is it possible to plug a router's uplink into the port of another
    > router? I wish to use a wireless router and a wired router at the same
    > time. Thanks.
    >
    > Shawn
    >


    You can have 2 routers but you will have to decide which one you want to be
    your DHCP server, disable DHCP on the other routerand change the IP address
    so that is on the same network (e.g..192.168.1.x) I reccomend assinging it
    an address that is outside the range of the starting address of the DHCP
    server.

    If you already have a hard wired router then just get a wireless access
    point and make it easy on yourself or just sell the hard wired router to a
    friend that needs/wants one and just get the wireless one since you can
    connect wired and wireless computers on it.


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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    Steve, Feb 13, 2004
    #5
  6. Shawn

    Trent© Guest

    On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 04:02:45 GMT, "Steve" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Shawn" <> wrote in message news:...
    >> Is it possible to plug a router's uplink into the port of another
    >> router? I wish to use a wireless router and a wired router at the same
    >> time. Thanks.
    >>
    >> Shawn
    >>

    >
    >You can have 2 routers but you will have to decide which one you want to be
    >your DHCP server,


    Aren't they BOTH servers? One accesses the ISP...and the other
    accesses the other router.

    >disable DHCP on the other routerand change the IP address
    >so that is on the same network (e.g..192.168.1.x) I reccomend assinging it
    >an address that is outside the range of the starting address of the DHCP
    >server.


    I've never had to do this. Just hook them up...and they work fine.


    Have a nice week...

    Trent

    Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
     
    Trent©, Feb 14, 2004
    #6
  7. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    "Trent©" wrote:

    > I've never had to do this. Just hook them up...and they work fine.


    That's nice to know. Thanks to Trent and everyone else for the response.

    Shawn
     
    Shawn, Feb 14, 2004
    #7
  8. Shawn

    Steve Guest

    "Trent©" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 04:02:45 GMT, "Steve" <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Shawn" <> wrote in message news:...
    > >> Is it possible to plug a router's uplink into the port of another
    > >> router? I wish to use a wireless router and a wired router at the same
    > >> time. Thanks.
    > >>
    > >> Shawn
    > >>

    > >
    > >You can have 2 routers but you will have to decide which one you want to

    be
    > >your DHCP server,

    >
    > Aren't they BOTH servers? One accesses the ISP...and the other
    > accesses the other router.
    >
    > >disable DHCP on the other routerand change the IP address
    > >so that is on the same network (e.g..192.168.1.x) I reccomend assinging

    it
    > >an address that is outside the range of the starting address of the DHCP
    > >server.

    >
    > I've never had to do this. Just hook them up...and they work fine.
    >
    >



    You never had to do this.... hmmmm


    Well I have this exact setup and this is what I had to do.. what brands are
    yo working with?





    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.588 / Virus Database: 372 - Release Date: 2/13/2004
     
    Steve, Feb 14, 2004
    #8
  9. Shawn

    Steve Guest

    "Shawn" <> wrote in message news:...
    > "Trent©" wrote:
    >
    > > I've never had to do this. Just hook them up...and they work fine.

    >
    > That's nice to know. Thanks to Trent and everyone else for the response.
    >
    > Shawn
    >


    Shawn,

    I really would not follow that advice. Both routers will conflict with each
    other.


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.588 / Virus Database: 372 - Release Date: 2/13/2004
     
    Steve, Feb 14, 2004
    #9
  10. Shawn

    Trent© Guest

    On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 06:16:33 GMT, "Steve" <> wrote:


    >> >You can have 2 routers but you will have to decide which one you want to

    >be
    >> >your DHCP server,

    >>
    >> Aren't they BOTH servers? One accesses the ISP...and the other
    >> accesses the other router.
    >>
    >> >disable DHCP on the other routerand change the IP address
    >> >so that is on the same network (e.g..192.168.1.x) I reccomend assinging

    >it
    >> >an address that is outside the range of the starting address of the DHCP
    >> >server.

    >>
    >> I've never had to do this. Just hook them up...and they work fine.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >You never had to do this.... hmmmm
    >
    >
    >Well I have this exact setup and this is what I had to do.. what brands are
    >yo working with?


    Mostly D-link, Linksys and Siemens.

    Don't get me wrong...I'm by no means a networking expert. But, for my
    workbench machines, all I do is connect a router to my main router in
    another part of the building. All it really does is act as a hub,
    AFAIK...since its not configured to connect to my ISP.

    YMMV...and it sounds like it does.


    Have a nice week...

    Trent

    Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
     
    Trent©, Feb 14, 2004
    #10
  11. Shawn

    DeMoN LaG Guest

    Trent© <> wrote in
    news::

    > Don't get me wrong...I'm by no means a networking expert. But, for my
    > workbench machines, all I do is connect a router to my main router in
    > another part of the building. All it really does is act as a hub,
    > AFAIK...since its not configured to connect to my ISP.
    >
    > YMMV...and it sounds like it does.
    >


    If both routers have a built in DHCP server, and they are both serving IPs
    in the same range, you have a chance of two machines on your network
    getting, for example, 192.168.1.100.

    --
    AIM: FrznFoodClerk
    email: de_on-lag@co_cast.net (_ = m)
    website: under construction
    Need a technician in the south Jersey area?
    email/IM for rates/services
     
    DeMoN LaG, Feb 14, 2004
    #11
  12. Shawn

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Shawn <> wrote in news::

    > Is it possible to plug a router's uplink into the port of another
    > router? I wish to use a wireless router and a wired router at the same
    > time. Thanks.
    >
    > Shawn
    >
    >



    It's Netgear but is a good example. You should also think about using the
    VPN protocols between the two and secure the wired and wireless secgments,
    since you have that oppertunity.

    http://kbserver.netgear.com/kb_web_files/N101236.asp

    http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,5171179~root=security,1~mode=flat

    You should think abount making the wired router the Internet (WAN) facing
    device and not port forward any ports to the safe zone router.

    Duane :)
     
    Duane Arnold, Feb 14, 2004
    #12
  13. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    Steve wrote:

    > I really would not follow that advice. Both routers will conflict with each
    > other.


    All right... I'll look for the DHCP setting when I get the wireless router,
    thanks.

    Shawn
     
    Shawn, Feb 16, 2004
    #13
  14. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    Duane Arnold wrote:

    > It's Netgear but is a good example. You should also think about using the
    > VPN protocols between the two and secure the wired and wireless secgments,
    > since you have that oppertunity.
    >
    > http://kbserver.netgear.com/kb_web_files/N101236.asp
    >
    > http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,5171179~root=security,1~mode=flat
    >
    > You should think abount making the wired router the Internet (WAN) facing
    > device and not port forward any ports to the safe zone router.


    OK I just got a new wireless router and I'm trying to do this. I'd appreciate
    some further clarifications from you guys:

    1) When my old wired router acts as the only DHCP server, it means wireless
    devices are assigned their IP from that wired router instead of the new
    wireless one, which simply acts as an access point to the wired router, is
    this right?

    2) "WAN" setting for the new wireless router: should I use "Dynamic IP
    address", as opposed to "static IP address"?

    3) "LAN IP" setting for the new wireless router: should I enter an IP that's
    in the range offered by the DHCP server?

    Thanks.
    Shawn
     
    Shawn, Feb 25, 2004
    #14
  15. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    I just realized from this diagram
    http://kbserver.netgear.com/kb_web_files/N101236.asp
    that I'm not supposed to use the uplink/WAN port when I use the second router as
    an access point. So I just connected one of the ports to the first router.

    But now I can't access the wireless browser's setup page in the browser, the IP
    address I assigned seems to be gone. I can however access the wired router's
    setup.
     
    Shawn, Feb 25, 2004
    #15
  16. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    Never mind, a hard reset was what I needed...
     
    Shawn, Feb 25, 2004
    #16
  17. Shawn

    DeMoN LaG Guest

    Shawn <> wrote in news::

    > 1) When my old wired router acts as the only DHCP server, it means
    > wireless devices are assigned their IP from that wired router instead
    > of the new wireless one, which simply acts as an access point to the
    > wired router, is this right?


    Right.

    > 2) "WAN" setting for the new wireless router: should I use "Dynamic IP
    > address", as opposed to "static IP address"?


    It shouldn't matter, as you should not have anything plugged into the
    second router's WAN port.

    > 3) "LAN IP" setting for the new wireless router: should I enter an IP
    > that's in the range offered by the DHCP server?


    No, that could cause an IP conflict with another machine should it be
    assigned the same address.

    If, for example, your server is handing out 192.168.1.100-192.168.1.150,
    and the first router is 192.168.1.1, make the new router 192.168.1.2.

    --
    AIM: FrznFoodClerk
    email: de_on-lag@co_cast.net (_ = m)
    website: under construction
    Need a technician in the south Jersey area?
    email/IM for rates/services
     
    DeMoN LaG, Feb 25, 2004
    #17
  18. Shawn

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Shawn <> wrote in news::

    > I just realized from this diagram
    > http://kbserver.netgear.com/kb_web_files/N101236.asp
    > that I'm not supposed to use the uplink/WAN port when I use the second
    > router as an access point. So I just connected one of the ports to the
    > first router.
    >
    > But now I can't access the wireless browser's setup page in the
    > browser, the IP address I assigned seems to be gone. I can however
    > access the wired router's setup.
    >
    >


    I think you're going to have to plug a machine directly into the wireless
    router to configure it.

    Duane :)
     
    Duane Arnold, Feb 25, 2004
    #18
  19. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    DeMoN LaG wrote:

    > > 3) "LAN IP" setting for the new wireless router: should I enter an IP
    > > that's in the range offered by the DHCP server?

    >
    > No, that could cause an IP conflict with another machine should it be
    > assigned the same address.


    ok, I'll try that later, thanks for the reply.
     
    Shawn, Feb 26, 2004
    #19
  20. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    Duane Arnold wrote:

    > I think you're going to have to plug a machine directly into the wireless
    > router to configure it.


    Thanks for the advice.
     
    Shawn, Feb 26, 2004
    #20
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