D70s Shooting Indoor w/o flash

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Dave White, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. Dave White

    Dave White Guest

    I am the proud new owner of a Nikon D70s camera. It came with the kit
    Nikkor 18-70mm zoom. I also purchased the Nikkor 70-300mm f4-f5.6 G lens
    from Ritz Camera.

    I am most interested in shooting pictues at my sons hockey games. I have
    tried in sports mode with marginal results.

    Does anyone have experience shooting inside a hockey rink? Fast action &
    long zoom?

    Maybe my needs are greater than my equipment capabilities.

    Being new, I was hoping someone might give me some pointers. Shutter,
    aperature, ISO, etc.

    I don't know where to start.

    Thanks.
     
    Dave White, Nov 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. "Dave White" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >I am the proud new owner of a Nikon D70s camera. It came with the kit
    >Nikkor 18-70mm zoom. I also purchased the Nikkor 70-300mm f4-f5.6 G lens
    >from Ritz Camera.
    >
    > I am most interested in shooting pictues at my sons hockey games. I have
    > tried in sports mode with marginal results.
    >
    > Does anyone have experience shooting inside a hockey rink? Fast action &
    > long zoom?
    >
    > Maybe my needs are greater than my equipment capabilities.
    >
    > Being new, I was hoping someone might give me some pointers. Shutter,
    > aperature, ISO, etc.
    >
    > I don't know where to start.


    Shooting moving objects indoors at 100mm+ must be one of the most
    challenging types of shooting which generally needs fast glass! Anything
    slower than f2.8 will likely be hit or miss, most likely the latter so be
    prepared to empty your wallet!

    Cheers Adrian www.boliston.co.uk
     
    Adrian Boliston, Nov 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. "Dave White" <> wrote:
    >
    > I don't know where to start.


    Get close to the rink. Use the 70-300 at 70mm. ISO 1600, camera mode =
    aperture priority, aperture = f/4.0.

    If the images are too blurry, use manual mode, ISO 1600, aperture = f/4.0,
    and various shutter speeds starting with 1/125. The faster the shutter
    speed, the darker the image. You can brighten up the images in a photo
    editor, but that will make the noise worse.

    Nikon makes a great 50/1.8 lens which isn't all that expensive, and a
    somewhat pricey, but also great, 85/1.8. Those will get you a faster shutter
    speed and/or less noise in the images at the cost of not being able to zoom.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Nov 11, 2006
    #3
  4. Dave White

    bmoag Guest

    Realize that the Sports Illustrated type pictures you probably have in mind
    are made under conditions to which you likely do not have access. Also
    massive numbers of images are combed through to find the keepers. That
    particular mindset is key.
    If the arena is reasonably bright and you are able to use a monopod or
    support the camera some other way then f4 at the highest ISO you can
    tolerate, in terms of image noise, will probably work out. F5.6 at the long
    end of the zoom may not if the arena lighting is marginal. You may want to
    investigate getting a used Nikon 80-200 f2.8, which is a fairly massive
    piece of glass and will give you an insight into what professional sports
    photographers carry (much bigger and heavier).
    I recommend you take test images at varying high ISOs to get a feel for what
    noise looks like and what is acceptable to you under those lighting
    conditions. If the light is a bit dim the D70 can get very noisy at ISO 800
    and above, but to some degree that can be modified in software.
    Shoot raw if you want the best results under those circumstances. That means
    you have to learn to process raw images if you want to get the best results.
    If you can move around the rink identify the places where you would want to
    shoot from.
    A key skill in getting action pictures is anticipating the moment and being
    in the right place at the right time. Set the camera for continuous firing,
    get a fast compact flash card, and fire away just before you think the thing
    will happen you want to capture. You will have to get a lot of not so good
    shots to get the keepers. Fortunately with digital this does not involve the
    expense of wasted film.
     
    bmoag, Nov 11, 2006
    #4
  5. Dave White

    Skip Guest

    Now that I got my rant out of the way by expressing it to my wife, rather
    than you, I'll give a piece of advice. Go back to Ritz, and buy a book on
    basic photography. Asking for advice on the internet is fine, but a hard
    copy book gives you the ability to reference back on a constant basis. And
    it can come along with you, so you can look things up as you come to them.
    Another piece of advice; get the heck out of the dummy modes and use what
    Canon calls "Creative Mode." Use aperture priority, set your aperture at
    its widest, and hope that there's enough light for the shutter speed the
    camera chooses. Your lens is rather slow, especially at the long end. I
    wouldn't attempt it with less than an f2.8 lens, which is exponentially more
    expensive than the one you have.

    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    www.pbase.com/skipm
     
    Skip, Nov 11, 2006
    #5
  6. Dave White

    Skip Guest

    Skip, Nov 11, 2006
    #6
  7. On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 08:07:28 -0800, in rec.photo.digital "Skip"
    <> wrote:

    >Now that I got my rant out of the way by expressing it to my wife, rather
    >than you, I'll give a piece of advice. Go back to Ritz, and buy a book on
    >basic photography. Asking for advice on the internet is fine, but a hard
    >copy book gives you the ability to reference back on a constant basis. And
    >it can come along with you, so you can look things up as you come to them.
    >Another piece of advice; get the heck out of the dummy modes and use what
    >Canon calls "Creative Mode." Use aperture priority, set your aperture at
    >its widest, and hope that there's enough light for the shutter speed the
    >camera chooses. Your lens is rather slow, especially at the long end. I
    >wouldn't attempt it with less than an f2.8 lens, which is exponentially more
    >expensive than the one you have.


    Um calm down Skip. The OP has a NIKON, not a Canon. The general advise to
    get out of the dummy modes is universal. However using "Creative Mode" is
    darned impossible.
    --
    Ed Ruf ()
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Nov 11, 2006
    #7
  8. Dave White

    Dave White Guest

    Thanks for the input.

    I will get a book on basic photography and I will experiment with settings.
    I plan to take many pictures at various settings and then review them. I
    understand that it will be a learning process. Fortunately, with digital I
    can take as many pictures as I want, and the price is the same :)

    I am overall very pleased with the camera.

    I am not looking for someone to solve my problems. I am simply looking for
    a couple tips to start my learning.

    Thank you to everyone who has taken the time to post a response.

    Dave White
    Sterling Heights, Michigan
     
    Dave White, Nov 11, 2006
    #8
  9. Dave White

    Mike Fields Guest

    "Dave White" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Thanks for the input.
    >
    > I will get a book on basic photography and I will experiment with
    > settings. I plan to take many pictures at various settings and then
    > review them. I understand that it will be a learning process.
    > Fortunately, with digital I can take as many pictures as I want, and
    > the price is the same :)
    >
    > I am overall very pleased with the camera.
    >
    > I am not looking for someone to solve my problems. I am simply
    > looking for a couple tips to start my learning.
    >
    > Thank you to everyone who has taken the time to post a response.
    >
    > Dave White
    > Sterling Heights, Michigan


    OK, couple of things (I also have the D70s that I use for my
    kids soccer games - dark and cloudy = yuk). The first
    problem I found with "sports mode" is it sets the camera to
    the "closest object" using the 5 focus zones - it ALWAYS
    picked a different subject from me :). You have two
    options - switch to either shutter or aperture priority and
    set it to continuous focus, center focus or if you want to
    use the sports mode, switch to the sports mode, then go
    into the menu and set it to single zone and select the
    center zone - that way YOU are responsible for what it
    focuses on (I hate being helped). Go for the high ISO
    I work on the theory I would rather have pictures with
    some noise than everything blurry from motion.

    Check out Ken Rockwell's site - he has some additional
    information on the D70 and D70s and how to set it
    up.
    http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d70/d70-settings.htm
    (lots of other good stuff there too).

    Also check out Thom Hogan's e-book on the D70 - it
    is around 600 pages of real good information.
    http://www.bythom.com/d70guide.htm

    Plan on shooting LOTS to get some keepers - the
    darker it is, the lower the percentage of keepers.
    Such is life -- look at the bright side (ha ha) - far
    cheaper than shooting that many pix in film !!!

    mikey
     
    Mike Fields, Nov 11, 2006
    #9
  10. Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!) wrote:

    > Um calm down Skip. The OP has a NIKON, not a Canon. The general
    > advise to get out of the dummy modes is universal. However using
    > "Creative Mode" is darned impossible.


    LOL! Do they make an ON/OFF switch for that?






    Rita
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Nov 12, 2006
    #10
  11. Dave White wrote:

    > Thanks for the input.
    >
    > I will get a book on basic photography and I will experiment with
    > settings. I plan to take many pictures at various settings and then
    > review them. I understand that it will be a learning process.
    > Fortunately, with digital I can take as many pictures as I want, and
    > the price is the same :)
    >
    > I am overall very pleased with the camera.
    >
    > I am not looking for someone to solve my problems. I am simply
    > looking for a couple tips to start my learning.


    Dave, good glass and technique are the key. Temporarily pack the zoom away
    and master the 50mm and everything else will come easy. If you are on a
    tight budget you might want to pick up a used 50mm f/1.8D for about $50.
    The f.1.4 is a bit better in build quality and speed, but is slightly more
    expensive. Build good handholding skills and practice with this lens and
    you will truly love low-light photography. There's nothing more satisfying
    than the mood you can convey with natural lighting. The D70(s) is a decent
    camera and will respond well and give phenomenal images when used properly.






    Rita
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Nov 12, 2006
    #11
  12. Dave White

    Skip Guest

    "Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 08:07:28 -0800, in rec.photo.digital "Skip"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Now that I got my rant out of the way by expressing it to my wife, rather
    >>than you, I'll give a piece of advice. Go back to Ritz, and buy a book
    >>on
    >>basic photography. Asking for advice on the internet is fine, but a hard
    >>copy book gives you the ability to reference back on a constant basis.
    >>And
    >>it can come along with you, so you can look things up as you come to them.
    >>Another piece of advice; get the heck out of the dummy modes and use what
    >>Canon calls "Creative Mode." Use aperture priority, set your aperture at
    >>its widest, and hope that there's enough light for the shutter speed the
    >>camera chooses. Your lens is rather slow, especially at the long end. I
    >>wouldn't attempt it with less than an f2.8 lens, which is exponentially
    >>more
    >>expensive than the one you have.

    >
    > Um calm down Skip. The OP has a NIKON, not a Canon. The general advise to
    > get out of the dummy modes is universal. However using "Creative Mode" is
    > darned impossible.
    > --
    > Ed Ruf ()


    That's why I said, "what Canon calls 'Creative Mode.'" I don't know what
    Nikon calls it, but it's the best I could do. ;-)

    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    www.pbase.com/skipm
     
    Skip, Nov 12, 2006
    #12
  13. Dave White

    Skip Guest

    "Rita Ä Berkowitz" <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!) wrote:
    >
    >> Um calm down Skip. The OP has a NIKON, not a Canon. The general
    >> advise to get out of the dummy modes is universal. However using
    >> "Creative Mode" is darned impossible.

    >
    > LOL! Do they make an ON/OFF switch for that?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Rita


    Sometimes, I think my switch is broken... ;-)

    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    www.pbase.com/skipm
     
    Skip, Nov 12, 2006
    #13
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