D70 White Balance Problem and (partial) Solution.......

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by mert, Oct 3, 2004.

  1. mert

    mert Guest

    Having recently bought my D70, I experienced a bit of buyer's remorse,
    having found the camera's rendering of skin tones was frequently
    spoiled by a blue color cast. I did quite a bit of online research on
    this problem, and found an old-fashioned (partial) solution to this
    white-balance problem: the Skylight 1A filter.

    This filter not only serves as a full-time protector for the camera's
    front glass, but also goes a long way toward cancelling the blue tint
    which shows up in so many of the D70's white balance results.

    I found the Skylight filter especially helpful with shots using the
    built-in speedlight; left to it's own devices, the speedlight lends an
    ugly blue-purple cast to skin tones.

    Without the Skylight filter, I was finding I had no latitiude
    available to me in the white-balance fine-tuning adjustments
    in-camera; in order to achieve realistic-looking skin tones. I had to
    dial the wb all the way to -3, no matter what the camera's wb logic
    would choose for the shots in question. The camera's custom hue
    adustment also needed to be boosted by one red value, from 0 to +3, at
    least, in order to cancel the blue color cast.

    With the Skylight filter, however, I find lattitude is restored, in
    that I can leave the wb fine-tuning and custom hue adjustment set at
    0, and have good skin tones, even with the speedlight.

    Hope this post helps others!

    Mert
    mert, Oct 3, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. mert

    Don F Guest

    "mert" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Having recently bought my D70, I experienced a bit of buyer's remorse,
    > having found the camera's rendering of skin tones was frequently
    > spoiled by a blue color cast. I did quite a bit of online research on
    > this problem, and found an old-fashioned (partial) solution to this
    > white-balance problem: the Skylight 1A filter.
    >
    > This filter not only serves as a full-time protector for the camera's
    > front glass, but also goes a long way toward cancelling the blue tint
    > which shows up in so many of the D70's white balance results.
    >
    > I found the Skylight filter especially helpful with shots using the
    > built-in speedlight; left to it's own devices, the speedlight lends an
    > ugly blue-purple cast to skin tones.
    >
    > Without the Skylight filter, I was finding I had no latitiude
    > available to me in the white-balance fine-tuning adjustments
    > in-camera; in order to achieve realistic-looking skin tones. I had to
    > dial the wb all the way to -3, no matter what the camera's wb logic
    > would choose for the shots in question. The camera's custom hue
    > adustment also needed to be boosted by one red value, from 0 to +3, at
    > least, in order to cancel the blue color cast.
    >
    > With the Skylight filter, however, I find lattitude is restored, in
    > that I can leave the wb fine-tuning and custom hue adjustment set at
    > 0, and have good skin tones, even with the speedlight.
    >
    > Hope this post helps others!
    >
    > Mert

    ---------------
    A simpler solution which works for me is to set WB A(uto),(-)2. This
    setting has solved the blue cast problem for just about all of my shots.
    Don F
    Don F, Oct 3, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On 3 Oct 2004 10:36:50 -0700, (mert) wrote:


    A lot easier is to shoot in RAW and set the WB to what you want in
    post...

    I'd say 9/10 shots have the correct WB to begin with.


    "I'm the luckiest man in the world. I have a cigarette
    lighter and a wife...and they both work!"
    Cadillac_Jones, Oct 3, 2004
    #3
  4. mert

    Jim Guest

    "mert" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Having recently bought my D70, I experienced a bit of buyer's remorse,
    > having found the camera's rendering of skin tones was frequently
    > spoiled by a blue color cast. I did quite a bit of online research on
    > this problem, and found an old-fashioned (partial) solution to this
    > white-balance problem: the Skylight 1A filter.

    I haven't seen any blue cast.. But, of course, I always use a skylight
    filter. If using it reduces a blue cast, the cast must be very light indeed
    because the 1A filter only eliminates a very small portion of the visible
    light. It does wipe out nearly all of the ultra-violet, but I thought that
    only film responded to those frequencies.
    Jim
    Jim, Oct 4, 2004
    #4
  5. mert

    adm Guest

    "Don F" <> wrote in message
    news:heY7d.289260$4o.95410@fed1read01...
    > >
    > > With the Skylight filter, however, I find lattitude is restored, in
    > > that I can leave the wb fine-tuning and custom hue adjustment set at
    > > 0, and have good skin tones, even with the speedlight.
    > >
    > > Hope this post helps others!
    > >
    > > Mert

    > ---------------
    > A simpler solution which works for me is to set WB A(uto),(-)2. This
    > setting has solved the blue cast problem for just about all of my shots.
    > Don F


    Agreed - this is exactly how I have mine set.

    The Nikon default WB seems slightly "cold" to me, and this warms it up
    nicely
    adm, Oct 4, 2004
    #5
  6. mert

    Mick Brown Guest

    I was about to add that I dont get the cast either, then I thought I'd
    better have a look at the "UV" filters the shop through in for me and look
    at that, they gave me skylights instead, might have to test it without the
    filters now.

    Mick Brown
    www.photo.net/photos/mlbrown


    "Jim" <> wrote in message
    news:CK%7d.2137$q%...
    >
    > "mert" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Having recently bought my D70, I experienced a bit of buyer's remorse,
    > > having found the camera's rendering of skin tones was frequently
    > > spoiled by a blue color cast. I did quite a bit of online research on
    > > this problem, and found an old-fashioned (partial) solution to this
    > > white-balance problem: the Skylight 1A filter.

    > I haven't seen any blue cast.. But, of course, I always use a skylight
    > filter. If using it reduces a blue cast, the cast must be very light

    indeed
    > because the 1A filter only eliminates a very small portion of the visible
    > light. It does wipe out nearly all of the ultra-violet, but I thought

    that
    > only film responded to those frequencies.
    > Jim
    >
    >
    Mick Brown, Oct 4, 2004
    #6
  7. mert

    Jim Guest

    "Mick Brown" <> wrote in message
    news:vwa8d.13959$...
    > I was about to add that I dont get the cast either, then I thought I'd
    > better have a look at the "UV" filters the shop through in for me and look
    > at that, they gave me skylights instead, might have to test it without the
    > filters now.
    >

    Skylight filters are UV filters.
    Here is a description of the 1A filter from the Kodak Photographic Filters
    Handbook, page 95:

    "1A Pale Pink. Absorbs ultraviolet radiation. Reduces excess bluishness of
    outdoor scenes photographed in open shade under a clear blue sky."

    The excessive bluishness is caused by the film being sensitive to
    ultraviolet light.

    The chart and table on that page shows that the cutoff wavelength of the 1A
    filter is about 405 nm.

    On page 143 of that handbook, you will see the CIE diagram which shows that
    the longest wavelength that the eye can see is 400 nm.

    Evidently, the sensor in the D70 is sensitive to ultraviolet light (as is
    all film ever made). So, it would be a good idea to use a skylight filter
    at all times.
    Jim
    Jim, Oct 4, 2004
    #7
  8. mert

    Fred B. Guest

    I have seen posts now where people say either new film has no UV sensitivity
    or AWB on D70 takes care of this.

    I am with Jim, film and digital cameras ARE sensitive to UV! That is my
    experience.

    I use skylight on my film cameras and UV filter on my digital cameras. I do
    have some skylights on some of my D70 lenses.

    USE some sort of filter!
    Fred B., Oct 5, 2004
    #8
  9. mert

    Scott Chapin Guest

    "Fred B." <> wrote in message
    news:pDl8d.28470$...
    > I have seen posts now where people say either new film has no UV

    sensitivity
    > or AWB on D70 takes care of this.
    >
    > I am with Jim, film and digital cameras ARE sensitive to UV! That is my
    > experience.
    >
    > I use skylight on my film cameras and UV filter on my digital cameras. I

    do
    > have some skylights on some of my D70 lenses.
    >
    > USE some sort of filter!
    >
    >

    I wonder if this is the same with the D100. All my lenses have Haze filters
    from their film days. My experience is that these gave the best skin tones,
    at least with Fuji film...IMHO. They seem to work wonderfully on my D100.

    Scott Chapin
    Scott Chapin, Oct 5, 2004
    #9
  10. mert

    Don F Guest

    "Jim" <> wrote in message
    news:1Tf8d.1132$...
    >
    > "Mick Brown" <> wrote in message
    > news:vwa8d.13959$...

    <snip>
    > Evidently, the sensor in the D70 is sensitive to ultraviolet light (as is
    > all film ever made). So, it would be a good idea to use a skylight filter
    > at all times.
    > Jim
    >

    --------------
    I prefer the UV filter to the Skylight filter on my D70.
    I have read (review sources) that Nikon's D70 auto white balance does a
    good job when compared with other cameras and for a majority of shots the WB
    is acceptable or well within tweaking boundaries in post processing.
    I can see no reason to add a color balance offset (however subtle) with a
    skylight filter *before* the camera's internal white balance adjustment
    where user preferences can be selected.
    Maybe someone has a different take on this.
    Don F
    Don F, Oct 5, 2004
    #10
  11. mert

    Gadgets Guest

    > Evidently, the sensor in the D70 is sensitive to ultraviolet light (as is
    > all film ever made). So, it would be a good idea to use a skylight filter
    > at all times.


    Technically not an issue, as most all lenses will absorb low UV anyway. For
    medical imaging where they want to use the UV sensitivity to record sharper
    surface details possible with the shorter wavelengths, Fluorite glass lenses
    are used which transmit more UV (down to ~340nm I think) ... Anything else
    though will block most of anything under 370-400nm.

    Two weeks back my 1A saved my lens from two rocks donated by a rally car...
    so yes, they are great things!

    Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com
    Gadgets, Oct 19, 2004
    #11
  12. mert

    Jer Guest

    Gadgets wrote:

    >>Evidently, the sensor in the D70 is sensitive to ultraviolet light (as is
    >>all film ever made). So, it would be a good idea to use a skylight filter
    >>at all times.

    >
    >
    > Technically not an issue, as most all lenses will absorb low UV anyway. For
    > medical imaging where they want to use the UV sensitivity to record sharper
    > surface details possible with the shorter wavelengths, Fluorite glass lenses
    > are used which transmit more UV (down to ~340nm I think) ... Anything else
    > though will block most of anything under 370-400nm.
    >
    > Two weeks back my 1A saved my lens from two rocks donated by a rally car...
    > so yes, they are great things!
    >
    > Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    > Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com



    Jason, I don't think you're supposed to stand in front of the hay bales.


    --
    jer email reply - I am not a 'ten'
    Jer, Oct 19, 2004
    #12
  13. "Gadgets" <info@gadgetaus...com> wrote in message
    news:...
    >> Evidently, the sensor in the D70 is sensitive to ultraviolet light (as is
    >> all film ever made). So, it would be a good idea to use a skylight
    >> filter
    >> at all times.

    >
    > Technically not an issue, as most all lenses will absorb low UV anyway.
    > For
    > medical imaging where they want to use the UV sensitivity to record
    > sharper
    > surface details possible with the shorter wavelengths, Fluorite glass
    > lenses
    > are used which transmit more UV (down to ~340nm I think) ... Anything
    > else
    > though will block most of anything under 370-400nm.


    I like to use a 1B filter (Nikon L1BC) on every lens, not only for
    protection, but also because most long lenses have some chromatic aberration
    at the deep violet end of the spectrum, which, in my application
    (astrophotography), shows up as blue haloes around stars. Also, I've found
    that a 1B filter can make a long lens sharper by cutting wavelengths that it
    does not focus well.

    --
    Clear skies,

    Michael A. Covington
    Author, Astrophotography for the Amateur
    www.covingtoninnovations.com/astromenu.html
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 19, 2004
    #13
  14. mert

    Roger Guest

    On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 08:07:12 -0500, Jer <> wrote:

    >Gadgets wrote:
    >
    >>>Evidently, the sensor in the D70 is sensitive to ultraviolet light (as is
    >>>all film ever made). So, it would be a good idea to use a skylight filter
    >>>at all times.

    >>
    >>
    >> Technically not an issue, as most all lenses will absorb low UV anyway. For
    >> medical imaging where they want to use the UV sensitivity to record sharper
    >> surface details possible with the shorter wavelengths, Fluorite glass lenses
    >> are used which transmit more UV (down to ~340nm I think) ... Anything else
    >> though will block most of anything under 370-400nm.
    >>
    >> Two weeks back my 1A saved my lens from two rocks donated by a rally car...
    >> so yes, they are great things!
    >>
    >> Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    >> Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com

    >
    >
    >Jason, I don't think you're supposed to stand in front of the hay bales.


    I did the Michigan Professional Road Rally two years in a row and
    never saw a hay bale except in a farmers field.

    I sat between two trees on the inside of a tight turn. I had two guys
    about the size of a line backer stand by my shoulders. The idea was
    for them to throw me back should a car head for the trees. It
    worked... twice. They took me literally as I must have skidded 10 feed
    each time. <:)) Both times the cars hit the trees where I'd been
    sitting.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    Roger, Oct 19, 2004
    #14
  15. mert

    Roger Guest

    On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 12:54:43 GMT, "Gadgets" <info@gadgetaus...com>
    wrote:

    >> Evidently, the sensor in the D70 is sensitive to ultraviolet light (as is
    >> all film ever made). So, it would be a good idea to use a skylight filter
    >> at all times.

    >
    >Technically not an issue, as most all lenses will absorb low UV anyway. For


    If you shoot from the air, or high up in the mountains, or very long
    shots with lots of sky they make a substantial difference.
    Particularly from airplanes. At least they have with my shooting so
    far.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com

    >medical imaging where they want to use the UV sensitivity to record sharper
    >surface details possible with the shorter wavelengths, Fluorite glass lenses
    >are used which transmit more UV (down to ~340nm I think) ... Anything else
    >though will block most of anything under 370-400nm.
    >
    >Two weeks back my 1A saved my lens from two rocks donated by a rally car...
    >so yes, they are great things!
    >
    >Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    >Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com
    Roger, Oct 19, 2004
    #15
  16. mert

    Tony Guest

    A better solution - if there is indeed a problem would probably be a UV
    filter as it will not add any pink to the mix.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

    "Jer" <> wrote in message
    news:cl33gt$...
    > Gadgets wrote:
    >
    > >>Evidently, the sensor in the D70 is sensitive to ultraviolet light (as

    is
    > >>all film ever made). So, it would be a good idea to use a skylight

    filter
    > >>at all times.

    > >
    > >
    > > Technically not an issue, as most all lenses will absorb low UV anyway.

    For
    > > medical imaging where they want to use the UV sensitivity to record

    sharper
    > > surface details possible with the shorter wavelengths, Fluorite glass

    lenses
    > > are used which transmit more UV (down to ~340nm I think) ... Anything

    else
    > > though will block most of anything under 370-400nm.
    > >
    > > Two weeks back my 1A saved my lens from two rocks donated by a rally

    car...
    > > so yes, they are great things!
    > >
    > > Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    > > Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com

    >
    >
    > Jason, I don't think you're supposed to stand in front of the hay bales.
    >
    >
    > --
    > jer email reply - I am not a 'ten'
    Tony, Oct 19, 2004
    #16
  17. mert

    Roger Guest

    On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 16:59:21 GMT, Roger
    <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 12:54:43 GMT, "Gadgets" <info@gadgetaus...com>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>> Evidently, the sensor in the D70 is sensitive to ultraviolet light (as is
    >>> all film ever made). So, it would be a good idea to use a skylight filter
    >>> at all times.

    >>
    >>Technically not an issue, as most all lenses will absorb low UV anyway. For

    >
    >If you shoot from the air, or high up in the mountains, or very long
    >shots with lots of sky they make a substantial difference.
    >Particularly from airplanes. At least they have with my shooting so
    >far.


    I should have said, "UV filters make a substantial difference". I
    don't use skylight filters.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    >
    >Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    >(N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    >www.rogerhalstead.com
    >
    >>medical imaging where they want to use the UV sensitivity to record sharper
    >>surface details possible with the shorter wavelengths, Fluorite glass lenses
    >>are used which transmit more UV (down to ~340nm I think) ... Anything else
    >>though will block most of anything under 370-400nm.
    >>
    >>Two weeks back my 1A saved my lens from two rocks donated by a rally car...
    >>so yes, they are great things!
    >>
    >>Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    >>Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com
    Roger, Oct 20, 2004
    #17
  18. mert

    Gadgets Guest

    Behind the bales is for wimps!

    .... or those that wanted to get this shot: (car, bale and spoiler bit in
    flight!)
    http://jaswebpics.com/RallyOfMelb/images/_DSC1099.jpg

    This is the inconsiderate driver who broke my filter shortly after this
    shot:
    http://jaswebpics.com/RallyOfMelb/images/_DSC1459.jpg
    Luckily his name is on the side, so I can send him the bill!!!

    Rally lesson 1: don't pan with the action when you're on the 'rock and dust'
    side! This was shot 2 of 3 - I should have turned my back then... all fun -
    the other photogs got a good laugh at me getting covered in dirt :)

    Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com
    Gadgets, Oct 20, 2004
    #18
  19. mert

    Jer Guest

    Gadgets wrote:
    > Behind the bales is for wimps!
    >
    > ... or those that wanted to get this shot: (car, bale and spoiler bit in
    > flight!)
    > http://jaswebpics.com/RallyOfMelb/images/_DSC1099.jpg
    >
    > This is the inconsiderate driver who broke my filter shortly after this
    > shot:
    > http://jaswebpics.com/RallyOfMelb/images/_DSC1459.jpg
    > Luckily his name is on the side, so I can send him the bill!!!


    His name is Subaru?


    >
    > Rally lesson 1: don't pan with the action when you're on the 'rock and dust'
    > side! This was shot 2 of 3 - I should have turned my back then... all fun -
    > the other photogs got a good laugh at me getting covered in dirt :)
    >
    > Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    > Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com



    --
    jer email reply - I am not a 'ten'
    Jer, Oct 20, 2004
    #19
  20. mert

    Gadgets Guest

    Rear left window... Driver: Herridge (Dean), CoDriver: Macneall.
    (small pic sorry)

    Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com
    Gadgets, Oct 20, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Frogiswrong

    Re: Nikon D100 white balance problem

    Frogiswrong, Aug 31, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    452
    W6DKN
    Aug 31, 2003
  2. jeff liss
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    487
    Andrew
    Sep 5, 2003
  3. BUNTOVNIK

    Problem with canon 10D manual white balance

    BUNTOVNIK, Oct 19, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    1,035
    Michael Quack
    Nov 2, 2003
  4. Steve Cutchen

    Custom White Balance: Gray Card or White Card?

    Steve Cutchen, Oct 21, 2005, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    31
    Views:
    1,591
  5. 88059355

    Life Balance Coaching: Balance Work And Life Like A Pro

    88059355, Jan 6, 2008, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    615
Loading...

Share This Page