D70 Vs D100

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Tom, Jun 7, 2004.

  1. Tom

    Tom Guest

    Which one you buy if in the market for a camera of this type. I going for
    the D100 until the D70 came out.

    Thanks,

    Tom D.
     
    Tom, Jun 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. Tom

    Douglas Guest

    I own 2 D70s.Both times I considered the D100,but the D70 is a better
    camera.The only thing I miss is the vert.grip option.The D70 has better
    metering,lighter and ready to shoot when I am! I also own a Canon D10,but
    like shooting with my D70s more!The D70 does require more user input than
    the Canon Digital Rebel.I for one went with the DSLR to have this
    ability.The Rebel is more like a point-and-shoot camera.
    "Tom" <> wrote in message
    news:O0Pwc.14059$...
    > Which one you buy if in the market for a camera of this type. I going

    for
    > the D100 until the D70 came out.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Tom D.
    >
    >
     
    Douglas, Jun 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. According to what I've read the D70 has much better write times for RAW
    files than the D100 does; that's the main advantage.

    Everything I've read at various review sites etc all say that the D70 is
    better than the D100, though the D100 is in fact a fabolous camera
    nonetheless. Must be--the price of the D100 has dropped very little since
    the D70 came out even though the D70 is totally better.

    LRH


    "Douglas" <.> wrote in message news:...
    > I own 2 D70s.Both times I considered the D100,but the D70 is a better
    > camera.The only thing I miss is the vert.grip option.The D70 has better
    > metering,lighter and ready to shoot when I am! I also own a Canon D10,but
    > like shooting with my D70s more!The D70 does require more user input than
    > the Canon Digital Rebel.I for one went with the DSLR to have this
    > ability.The Rebel is more like a point-and-shoot camera.
    > "Tom" <> wrote in message
    > news:O0Pwc.14059$...
    > > Which one you buy if in the market for a camera of this type. I going

    > for
    > > the D100 until the D70 came out.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Tom D.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Larry R Harrison Jr, Jun 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Tom

    Bob Flint Guest

    On Sun, 6 Jun 2004 21:01:26 -0400, "Tom" <> wrote:

    >Which one you buy if in the market for a camera of this type. I going for
    >the D100 until the D70 came out.
    >
    >Thanks,
    >
    >Tom D.
    >


    get the D70
     
    Bob Flint, Jun 7, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <O0Pwc.14059$>, Tom
    <> wrote:

    > Which one you buy if in the market for a camera of this type. I going for
    > the D100 until the D70 came out.


    I'm kind of torn myself. I don't own either yet; but I DO have many
    years experience with Nikon film SLR's. I was 100% convinced I wanted
    the D70 'til I looked through the finder.

    While the D70 is superior in almost every way electronically
    (technology moves fast) the compromises in the viewfinder show. It has
    a "pentamirror" (an open arrangement of mirrors instead of a solid
    glass prism) This is cheaper and lighter, but cuts brightness
    considerably, and induces diffraction effects. To partially compensate,
    Nikon, reduced magnification and coverage, and used a more transparent
    focusing screen. The screen makes it much more difficult to focus
    visually; in fact I wonder why they even bothered with a depth of field
    preview button.

    By sheer conincidence, the Nikon rep was there while I was in my local
    camera shop; I pointed out these issues, and half jokingly asked if I
    should wait for a "D80". He sheepishly admitted to the finder issues;
    and said "it probably won't be called a D80, and won't be out THIS
    summer..."
     
    Scott Schuckert, Jun 7, 2004
    #5
  6. Tom

    JRS Guest

    For those of us debating the D70 versus EOS 10D decision - could you please
    comment on how the two compare, since you own both?

    I am particularly interested in the usability of the Nikon D70's ISO 800
    images compard to the Canon.

    Thanks,

    Jose
    "Douglas" <.> wrote in message news:...
    > I own 2 D70s.Both times I considered the D100,but the D70 is a better
    > camera.The only thing I miss is the vert.grip option.The D70 has better
    > metering,lighter and ready to shoot when I am! I also own a Canon D10,but
    > like shooting with my D70s more!The D70 does require more user input than
    > the Canon Digital Rebel.I for one went with the DSLR to have this
    > ability.The Rebel is more like a point-and-shoot camera.
    > "Tom" <> wrote in message
    > news:O0Pwc.14059$...
    > > Which one you buy if in the market for a camera of this type. I going

    > for
    > > the D100 until the D70 came out.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Tom D.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    JRS, Jun 7, 2004
    #6
  7. Scott Schuckert <> wrote in message news:<070620040830401846%>...

    > While the D70 is superior in almost every way electronically
    > (technology moves fast) the compromises in the viewfinder show.


    No freaking kidding. While I've lusted after this camera much, you
    reminded me.

    That is, I was in Ritz (yeah, Ritz) checking it out. It was a LOVELY
    camera, loved its quick responsiveness--and all the review sites have
    raved about it. That said, I looked through the viewfinder and was
    definitely disappointed. I have the Nikon N80 film camera--a fine 35mm
    camera indeed--and compared to that the D70 sure looked inferior.
    Better than a digicam's peephole, yeah, but still not up the N80.

    I own the Coolpix 5700--just got it not quite 3 weeks ago--and have
    been getting used to it. I can sure see why it's considered a
    higher-grade camera. Still sometimes I wish I had the D100 or D70
    instead; I miss the quick responsiveness of my N80 when using the
    5700. Flash compensation, single or continuous AF are in the menus
    rather than dedicated buttons like the N80 or D100-70. Speaking of AF,
    low-light AF is a BITCH with the 5700--not just at full-zoom either. I
    sometimes wish I had gotten the Sony DSC-F717 instead because of this,
    but the 5700 has more manual options and RAW mode plus others have
    said there are work-arounds for the low-light AF issues.

    So, I think in my case I'll stick with the 5700 for awhile and maybe
    the next version of the D70 (whatever it will be called) will improve
    upon that. Still, the D70 is extremely responsive and makes it
    tempting to have it rather than the 5700.
     
    Larry R Harrison Jr, Jun 7, 2004
    #7
  8. Tom

    SteveJ Guest

    I agree as I have looked at the D70 and compared it to my 5700. Finally I
    gave my 5700 a chance and for the money I am still pleased with it greatly,
    the 5700 still gives better pictures than the new 8700 at ISO 400. Hard to
    beat.


    "Larry R Harrison Jr" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Scott Schuckert <> wrote in message

    news:<070620040830401846%>...
    >
    > > While the D70 is superior in almost every way electronically
    > > (technology moves fast) the compromises in the viewfinder show.

    >
    > No freaking kidding. While I've lusted after this camera much, you
    > reminded me.
    >
    > That is, I was in Ritz (yeah, Ritz) checking it out. It was a LOVELY
    > camera, loved its quick responsiveness--and all the review sites have
    > raved about it. That said, I looked through the viewfinder and was
    > definitely disappointed. I have the Nikon N80 film camera--a fine 35mm
    > camera indeed--and compared to that the D70 sure looked inferior.
    > Better than a digicam's peephole, yeah, but still not up the N80.
    >
    > I own the Coolpix 5700--just got it not quite 3 weeks ago--and have
    > been getting used to it. I can sure see why it's considered a
    > higher-grade camera. Still sometimes I wish I had the D100 or D70
    > instead; I miss the quick responsiveness of my N80 when using the
    > 5700. Flash compensation, single or continuous AF are in the menus
    > rather than dedicated buttons like the N80 or D100-70. Speaking of AF,
    > low-light AF is a BITCH with the 5700--not just at full-zoom either. I
    > sometimes wish I had gotten the Sony DSC-F717 instead because of this,
    > but the 5700 has more manual options and RAW mode plus others have
    > said there are work-arounds for the low-light AF issues.
    >
    > So, I think in my case I'll stick with the 5700 for awhile and maybe
    > the next version of the D70 (whatever it will be called) will improve
    > upon that. Still, the D70 is extremely responsive and makes it
    > tempting to have it rather than the 5700.
     
    SteveJ, Jun 8, 2004
    #8
  9. Tom

    Scott Evans Guest

    Scott Schuckert <> wrote in message news:<070620040830401846%>...

    > While the D70 is superior in almost every way electronically
    > (technology moves fast) the compromises in the viewfinder show. It has
    > a "pentamirror" (an open arrangement of mirrors instead of a solid
    > glass prism) This is cheaper and lighter, but cuts brightness
    > considerably, and induces diffraction effects. To partially compensate,
    > Nikon, reduced magnification and coverage, and used a more transparent
    > focusing screen. The screen makes it much more difficult to focus
    > visually; in fact I wonder why they even bothered with a depth of field
    > preview button.


    So I'm not losing my mind. I've had my D70 for about 2 months and overall
    I love it *except* that I have a hell of a time taking in-focus photos --
    a problem that I never had on my N70 or Nikon F (or Yashicamat or ... you
    name it). But until reading your explanation I never knew why; I didn't
    do a lot of investigation into the D70 before buying.

    The camera takes great photos but this focus issue is really disappointing.
    It's actually difficult to tell if something is in focus! Objects seem to
    have blurry "halos" around them.


    --
    scott evans :: www.antisleep.com
     
    Scott Evans, Jun 15, 2004
    #9
  10. Scott Evans wrote:

    > Scott Schuckert <> wrote in message news:<070620040830401846%>...
    >
    >
    >>While the D70 is superior in almost every way electronically
    >>(technology moves fast) the compromises in the viewfinder show. It has
    >>a "pentamirror" (an open arrangement of mirrors instead of a solid
    >>glass prism) This is cheaper and lighter, but cuts brightness
    >>considerably, and induces diffraction effects. To partially compensate,
    >>Nikon, reduced magnification and coverage, and used a more transparent
    >>focusing screen. The screen makes it much more difficult to focus
    >>visually; in fact I wonder why they even bothered with a depth of field
    >>preview button.

    >
    >
    > So I'm not losing my mind. I've had my D70 for about 2 months and overall
    > I love it *except* that I have a hell of a time taking in-focus photos --
    > a problem that I never had on my N70 or Nikon F (or Yashicamat or ... you
    > name it). But until reading your explanation I never knew why; I didn't
    > do a lot of investigation into the D70 before buying.
    >
    > The camera takes great photos but this focus issue is really disappointing.
    > It's actually difficult to tell if something is in focus! Objects seem to
    > have blurry "halos" around them.


    Canon's EOS 300D also uses a mirror prism. They do no have 'diffraction'
    effects - that's one thing mirrors don't do - but they are inaccurate
    compared to glass pentaprisms and simply don't create as sharp or bright
    a finder image.

    DK
     
    David Kilpatrick, Jun 15, 2004
    #10
  11. In article <canjic$hfm$>, David Kilpatrick
    <> wrote:

    > Canon's EOS 300D also uses a mirror prism. They do no have 'diffraction'
    > effects - that's one thing mirrors don't do - but they are inaccurate
    > compared to glass pentaprisms and simply don't create as sharp or bright
    > a finder image.


    Perhaps I used the wrong term? I was referring to the scattering effect
    which occurs at each air/glass interface - of which we have fewer in a
    pantaprism as opposed to a pentamirror.

    Whatever it's called, it's a "bad thing", and not just a loss of
    brightness. I can SEE the fringing...
     
    Scott Schuckert, Jun 16, 2004
    #11
  12. Tom

    Fil Ament Guest

    In article <160620041021550165%>,
    Scott Schuckert <> wrote:

    > Whatever it's called, it's a "bad thing", and not just a loss of
    > brightness. I can SEE the fringing...


    Then there is something wrong with your camera.
    --
    The joy of a forever Unknown Artist is the mystery and potential
    of a Blank canvas.

    This is a provision for the mind's eye.
     
    Fil Ament, Jun 16, 2004
    #12
  13. In article <>, Fil Ament
    <> wrote:

    > Then there is something wrong with your camera.


    Rather, must be my eyes. It affects all the samples of the D70 I've
    seen, and not the D100's.
     
    Scott Schuckert, Jun 17, 2004
    #13
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