d70 spot

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by james, Jun 16, 2006.

  1. james

    james Guest

    I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove them
    with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air into
    the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle, and can
    then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in exactly
    the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it would
    be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and anyway,
    it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this just a
    highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I use).
    james, Jun 16, 2006
    #1
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  2. james

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    james wrote:
    > I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove them
    > with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air into
    > the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle, and can
    > then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in exactly
    > the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it would
    > be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and anyway,
    > it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this just a
    > highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    > camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I use).
    >
    >


    Sounds like it is on the imager; it can happen when you change
    lenses. There are some good ways to clean them. Look up Visible
    Dust with Google. I use their brushes on my EOS 20D.

    Phil
    Phil Wheeler, Jun 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. james

    k-man Guest

    Assuming that when you say that you're blowing air into the front of
    the camera you mean that you're blowing air into the front with the
    lens off, I'd say that you're just blowing on the mirror and that the
    sensor's dirty. Someone mentioned using the VisibleDust products.
    They're good but I would recommend using a traditional blower first.
    It sounds like you might already have one (assuming that you're using a
    blower and not your mouth). But I myself like the Giottos Rocket Air
    Blower ($10 from B&H for the medium version). I have a D70s and found
    a spot on my sensor (yesterday, in fact). One puff from that puppy and
    the spot is gone. I can't remember if the D70 has it; but the D70s has
    a mirror lock-up function (actually, the D70 probably has it after the
    firmware upgrade that brings it up to date with the D70s). Activate
    the mirror lock-up and the mirror moves out of the way, revealing the
    sensor. Don't touch the sensor and don't squeeze the hell out of the
    blower (and don't use canned air on it). Just puff a little air onto
    it. Hopefully, the debris will simply float away. If not, then you
    might try a tad more air pressure or you then might want to consider
    one of the VisibleDust products.

    Kevin



    james wrote:
    > I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove them
    > with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air into
    > the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle, and can
    > then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in exactly
    > the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it would
    > be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and anyway,
    > it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this just a
    > highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    > camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I use).
    k-man, Jun 17, 2006
    #3
  4. james

    k-man Guest

    Before someone yells at me... Yes, VisibleDust has a traditional type
    blower as well, similar to the Giottos Rocket Air Blower I mentioned.
    I was initially referrring to VisibleDust's brushes. I would use a
    blower first before using a brush.

    Thanks.
    Kevin


    k-man wrote:
    > Assuming that when you say that you're blowing air into the front of
    > the camera you mean that you're blowing air into the front with the
    > lens off, I'd say that you're just blowing on the mirror and that the
    > sensor's dirty. Someone mentioned using the VisibleDust products.
    > They're good but I would recommend using a traditional blower first.
    > It sounds like you might already have one (assuming that you're using a
    > blower and not your mouth). But I myself like the Giottos Rocket Air
    > Blower ($10 from B&H for the medium version). I have a D70s and found
    > a spot on my sensor (yesterday, in fact). One puff from that puppy and
    > the spot is gone. I can't remember if the D70 has it; but the D70s has
    > a mirror lock-up function (actually, the D70 probably has it after the
    > firmware upgrade that brings it up to date with the D70s). Activate
    > the mirror lock-up and the mirror moves out of the way, revealing the
    > sensor. Don't touch the sensor and don't squeeze the hell out of the
    > blower (and don't use canned air on it). Just puff a little air onto
    > it. Hopefully, the debris will simply float away. If not, then you
    > might try a tad more air pressure or you then might want to consider
    > one of the VisibleDust products.
    >
    > Kevin
    >
    >
    >
    > james wrote:
    > > I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove them
    > > with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air into
    > > the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle, and can
    > > then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in exactly
    > > the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it would
    > > be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and anyway,
    > > it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this just a
    > > highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    > > camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I use).
    k-man, Jun 17, 2006
    #4
  5. james

    Guest

    Thus spake james () unto the assembled multitudes:
    > I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove them
    > with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air into
    > the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle, and can
    > then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in exactly
    > the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it would
    > be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and anyway,
    > it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this just a
    > highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    > camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I use).


    All the respondants so far seem to think it's dirt, but James has said the
    spot re-appears in the same place after cleaning, and - crucially - after a
    dozen or so shots. The symptoms suggest that it's a noise problem -
    possibly a thermal issue - with the CCD or electronics.


    --

    Andy Clews
    University of Sussex
    Remove DENTURES if replying by email
    , Jun 17, 2006
    #5
  6. On Fri, 16 Jun 2006 18:55:09 +0100, in rec.photo.digital "james"
    <> wrote:

    >I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove them
    >with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air into
    >the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle, and can
    >then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in exactly
    >the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it would
    >be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and anyway,
    >it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this just a
    >highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    >camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I use).


    Can you post an example somewhere?

    --
    Ed Ruf ()
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Jun 17, 2006
    #6
  7. james

    k-man Guest

    I don't understand how you could come to that conclusion based only on
    what James posted. He said that he tried shooting air into the front
    of the camera. If he's not using mirror lock-up then there's a strong
    chance that he's hitting the mirror only and not the sensor. Thus, if
    there's dirt on the sensor, it will remain on the sensor and show up
    shot after shot.

    Kevin


    wrote:
    > Thus spake james () unto the assembled multitudes:
    > > I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove them
    > > with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air into
    > > the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle, and can
    > > then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in exactly
    > > the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it would
    > > be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and anyway,
    > > it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this just a
    > > highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    > > camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I use).

    >
    > All the respondants so far seem to think it's dirt, but James has said the
    > spot re-appears in the same place after cleaning, and - crucially - after a
    > dozen or so shots. The symptoms suggest that it's a noise problem -
    > possibly a thermal issue - with the CCD or electronics.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Andy Clews
    > University of Sussex
    > Remove DENTURES if replying by email
    k-man, Jun 17, 2006
    #7
  8. james

    james Guest

    I am using mirror lock up. I know its not recommended but I use compressed
    air from a can to blow dirt out. The spot on a 6 by 4 print is about 2mm
    in diameter and only shows up on a blue sky. It definitely reappears in the
    same place after about a dozen shots. I'm not technically minded but it
    seems rather improbable?


    "k-man" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I don't understand how you could come to that conclusion based only on
    > what James posted. He said that he tried shooting air into the front
    > of the camera. If he's not using mirror lock-up then there's a strong
    > chance that he's hitting the mirror only and not the sensor. Thus, if
    > there's dirt on the sensor, it will remain on the sensor and show up
    > shot after shot.
    >
    > Kevin
    >
    >
    > wrote:
    >> Thus spake james () unto the assembled multitudes:
    >> > I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove
    >> > them
    >> > with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air
    >> > into
    >> > the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle,
    >> > and can
    >> > then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in
    >> > exactly
    >> > the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it
    >> > would
    >> > be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and
    >> > anyway,
    >> > it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this
    >> > just a
    >> > highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    >> > camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I
    >> > use).

    >>
    >> All the respondants so far seem to think it's dirt, but James has said
    >> the
    >> spot re-appears in the same place after cleaning, and - crucially - after
    >> a
    >> dozen or so shots. The symptoms suggest that it's a noise problem -
    >> possibly a thermal issue - with the CCD or electronics.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Andy Clews
    >> University of Sussex
    >> Remove DENTURES if replying by email

    >
    james, Jun 17, 2006
    #8
  9. james

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    james wrote:
    > I am using mirror lock up. I know its not recommended but I use compressed
    > air from a can to blow dirt out. The spot on a 6 by 4 print is about 2mm
    > in diameter and only shows up on a blue sky. It definitely reappears in the
    > same place after about a dozen shots. I'm not technically minded but it
    > seems rather improbable?
    >


    You need to clean the sensor. Blowing air in there is not a good
    idea .. and apparently not solving the problem. Again, look at
    Visible Dust; works well with my 20D (which has a specific
    Cleaning mode in the menu).

    Phil
    Phil Wheeler, Jun 17, 2006
    #9
  10. james

    ASAAR Guest

    On Sat, 17 Jun 2006 18:03:55 +0100, james wrote:

    > I am using mirror lock up. I know its not recommended but I use
    > compressed air from a can to blow dirt out. The spot on a 6 by 4 print
    > is about 2mm in diameter and only shows up on a blue sky. It definitely
    > reappears in the same place after about a dozen shots. I'm not technically
    > minded but it seems rather improbable?


    Perhaps a cluster of the sensor's elements are flaky and stop
    functioning properly when the sensor heats up? Compressed air would
    cool the sensor. If you stop using the camera when the spot
    appears, such as by turning it off for an hour, when you resume
    shooting does the spot reappear immediately, or only after another
    dozen shots are taken?
    ASAAR, Jun 17, 2006
    #10
  11. "james" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am using mirror lock up. I know its not recommended but I use
    >compressed air from a can to blow dirt out. The spot on a 6 by 4
    >print is about 2mm in diameter and only shows up on a blue sky. It
    >definitely reappears in the same place after about a dozen shots. I'm
    >not technically minded but it seems rather improbable?


    Spots due to dust or pollen on the sensor's cover-glass or the
    AA-filter in front of the sensor will be more visible at small
    apertures (larger f/ number). Maybe the re-appearance is due to
    smaller f/ number being used.

    Bart
    Bart van der Wolf, Jun 18, 2006
    #11
  12. james

    Bill Hilton Guest

    >james wrote:
    > The spot on a 6 by 4 print is about 2mm
    > in diameter and only shows up on a blue sky. It definitely reappears in the
    > same place after about a dozen shots. I'm not technically minded but it
    > seems rather improbable?


    Can you check the exif data ona couple of those files and see if you
    are changing the aperture? At f/22 for example you might see the spot
    while at f/4 you won't see it ... just another variable to check but
    this would explain why it comes and goes from the same area.

    Bill
    Bill Hilton, Jun 18, 2006
    #12
  13. james

    k-man Guest

    James:

    When you say that the spot reappears after about a dozen shots, are you
    saying that once you turn on the camera and start taking pics that the
    spot doesn't show up until after you've taken about 12 shots? Or, are
    you saying that if you turn on the camera and take 12 shots the spot
    shows up in all pics, 1 through 12? Are you keeping the aperture and
    lens focal length constant during these tests?

    If the spot's always showing up, then it seems the dirt's a little
    sticky (not coming off via a blower). Go for something like Visible
    Dust's Sensor Brush. It's a little expensive; but it's very good. You
    could edit out the spot with a photo editor. But doing that will get
    old fast. :)

    Kevin


    james wrote:
    > I am using mirror lock up. I know its not recommended but I use compressed
    > air from a can to blow dirt out. The spot on a 6 by 4 print is about 2mm
    > in diameter and only shows up on a blue sky. It definitely reappears in the
    > same place after about a dozen shots. I'm not technically minded but it
    > seems rather improbable?
    >
    >
    > "k-man" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I don't understand how you could come to that conclusion based only on
    > > what James posted. He said that he tried shooting air into the front
    > > of the camera. If he's not using mirror lock-up then there's a strong
    > > chance that he's hitting the mirror only and not the sensor. Thus, if
    > > there's dirt on the sensor, it will remain on the sensor and show up
    > > shot after shot.
    > >
    > > Kevin
    > >
    > >
    > > wrote:
    > >> Thus spake james () unto the assembled multitudes:
    > >> > I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove
    > >> > them
    > >> > with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air
    > >> > into
    > >> > the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle,
    > >> > and can
    > >> > then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in
    > >> > exactly
    > >> > the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it
    > >> > would
    > >> > be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and
    > >> > anyway,
    > >> > it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this
    > >> > just a
    > >> > highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    > >> > camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I
    > >> > use).
    > >>
    > >> All the respondants so far seem to think it's dirt, but James has said
    > >> the
    > >> spot re-appears in the same place after cleaning, and - crucially - after
    > >> a
    > >> dozen or so shots. The symptoms suggest that it's a noise problem -
    > >> possibly a thermal issue - with the CCD or electronics.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >>
    > >> Andy Clews
    > >> University of Sussex
    > >> Remove DENTURES if replying by email

    > >
    k-man, Jun 18, 2006
    #13
  14. james <> wrote:
    > I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove them
    > with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air into
    > the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle, and can
    > then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in exactly
    > the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it would
    > be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and anyway,
    > it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this just a
    > highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    > camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I use).
    >


    You need to lockup the mirror before blowing the air into the camera,
    otherwise the mirror blocks access to the sensor. Careful, air coming out of
    a can is cold and causes condensation of moist air nearby, potentially cooling
    the sensor to form precipitation on its surface or blowing moist air onto the
    sensor with similar results.

    Try buying a sensor cleaning kit online or bring your camera into a *real*
    camera shop to get the sensor cleaned (it is actually the anti-aliasing filter
    that is dirty).

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Jun 19, 2006
    #14
  15. wrote:
    > Thus spake james () unto the assembled multitudes:
    >> I have a spot that keeps appearing on my images. I have to remove them
    >> with my image editing software. The problem is that I blow some air into
    >> the front of the camera, presumably blowing away the dust particle, and can
    >> then take about a dozen shots after which the spot appears again, in exactly
    >> the same place. It's not a speck of dust getting blown around as it would
    >> be improbable for it to settle down in the same place each time, and anyway,
    >> it takes about a dozen shots before it reappears at all. Is this just a
    >> highly improbable action by a speck of dust or something to do with the
    >> camera that is more complicated? (It does not matter which lens I use).

    >
    > All the respondants so far seem to think it's dirt, but James has said the
    > spot re-appears in the same place after cleaning, and - crucially - after a
    > dozen or so shots. The symptoms suggest that it's a noise problem -
    > possibly a thermal issue - with the CCD or electronics.
    >


    James did not indicate he put up the mirror before blowing air ... so he
    likely didn't even clean the sensor.

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Jun 19, 2006
    #15
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