D70 detects vertical shots. How?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ken Tough, Oct 6, 2004.

  1. Ken Tough

    Ken Tough Guest

    Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]

    --
    Ken Tough
     
    Ken Tough, Oct 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. Ken Tough

    chidalgo Guest

    Ken Tough escribio:

    > Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    > display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    > if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]


    Usually is some kind of switch with a drop of mercury (liquid metal)
    inside, so when you rotate the camera, the switch knows in which
    position the camera is :)


    --
    chidalgo
     
    chidalgo, Oct 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. Ken Tough

    Mark M Guest

    "Ken Tough" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    > display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    > if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]


    Then...heaven forbid...you might have to rotate the shot after the fact like
    we've been doing for years.
     
    Mark M, Oct 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Ken Tough

    Ken Tough Guest

    Mark M <> wrote:

    >"Ken Tough" <> wrote


    >> Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    >> display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    >> if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]


    >Then...heaven forbid...you might have to rotate the shot after the fact like
    >we've been doing for years.


    Sorry, I neglected to put the smiley. I can just imagine that
    it would be annoying if it was random when shooting down from a
    tripod to flat material on a table. The other annoying thing is that
    when rotated, the image has to be reduced in size because of the
    aspect ratio of the display. Can it be switched off as an option?

    --
    Ken Tough
     
    Ken Tough, Oct 7, 2004
    #4
  5. Ken Tough <> wrote:

    >Mark M <> wrote:
    >
    >>"Ken Tough" <> wrote

    >
    >>> Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    >>> display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    >>> if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]

    >
    >>Then...heaven forbid...you might have to rotate the shot after the fact like
    >>we've been doing for years.

    >
    >Sorry, I neglected to put the smiley. I can just imagine that
    >it would be annoying if it was random when shooting down from a
    >tripod to flat material on a table. The other annoying thing is that
    >when rotated, the image has to be reduced in size because of the
    >aspect ratio of the display. Can it be switched off as an option?


    Yes you can switch the rotation of the display off for playback. The
    image will still be rotated when you transfer it to the pc (unless it
    has been turned off on the pc). The detection can also be switch off.
    But then of couse the picture cannot be rotated automatically.

    Peter
     
    Peter Rongsted, Oct 7, 2004
    #5
  6. Ken Tough <> writes:

    > Mark M <> wrote:
    >
    > >"Ken Tough" <> wrote

    >
    > >> Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    > >> display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    > >> if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]

    >
    > >Then...heaven forbid...you might have to rotate the shot after the fact like
    > >we've been doing for years.

    >
    > Sorry, I neglected to put the smiley. I can just imagine that
    > it would be annoying if it was random when shooting down from a
    > tripod to flat material on a table. The other annoying thing is that
    > when rotated, the image has to be reduced in size because of the
    > aspect ratio of the display. Can it be switched off as an option?


    I believe all of the cameras that note the orientation in the EXIF have an
    option to turn off the rotation of the display in the LCD.

    --
    Michael Meissner
    email:
    http://www.the-meissners.org
     
    Michael Meissner, Oct 7, 2004
    #6
  7. Ken Tough

    Colin D Guest

    Ken Tough wrote:
    >
    > Mark M <> wrote:
    >
    > >"Ken Tough" <> wrote

    >
    > >> Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    > >> display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    > >> if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]

    >
    > >Then...heaven forbid...you might have to rotate the shot after the fact like
    > >we've been doing for years.

    >
    > Sorry, I neglected to put the smiley. I can just imagine that
    > it would be annoying if it was random when shooting down from a
    > tripod to flat material on a table. The other annoying thing is that
    > when rotated, the image has to be reduced in size because of the
    > aspect ratio of the display. Can it be switched off as an option?
    >
    > --
    > Ken Tough


    I watched a photog with a D70 on a tripod shooting a portrait shot of a
    child recently. He had the auto-rotate turned on, and the camera LCD
    dutifully showed the image rotated sideways, so he was screwing his head
    sideways to look at the image. I asked him why he didn't turn
    auto-rotate off, and he claimed that the camera couldn't do that. Not
    knowing much about D70s I didn't argue, I just said that I could do that
    with my 300D, and left it at that. Personally, I think it's a pretty
    useless gimmick anyway, and it's only there to avoid rotating the camera
    when playing back shots with the camera in hand. And since it reduces
    the size of the image to fit the long dimension across the LCD, it's
    harder to evaluate the shot. Mine is off, and it will stay off.

    Colin.
     
    Colin D, Oct 7, 2004
    #7
  8. Ken Tough

    Mark M Guest

    "Colin D" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ken Tough wrote:
    > >
    > > Mark M <> wrote:
    > >
    > > >"Ken Tough" <> wrote

    > >
    > > >> Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    > > >> display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    > > >> if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]

    > >
    > > >Then...heaven forbid...you might have to rotate the shot after the fact

    like
    > > >we've been doing for years.

    > >
    > > Sorry, I neglected to put the smiley. I can just imagine that
    > > it would be annoying if it was random when shooting down from a
    > > tripod to flat material on a table. The other annoying thing is that
    > > when rotated, the image has to be reduced in size because of the
    > > aspect ratio of the display. Can it be switched off as an option?
    > >
    > > --
    > > Ken Tough

    >
    > I watched a photog with a D70 on a tripod shooting a portrait shot of a
    > child recently. He had the auto-rotate turned on, and the camera LCD
    > dutifully showed the image rotated sideways, so he was screwing his head
    > sideways to look at the image. I asked him why he didn't turn
    > auto-rotate off, and he claimed that the camera couldn't do that. Not
    > knowing much about D70s I didn't argue, I just said that I could do that
    > with my 300D, and left it at that. Personally, I think it's a pretty
    > useless gimmick anyway, and it's only there to avoid rotating the camera
    > when playing back shots with the camera in hand. And since it reduces
    > the size of the image to fit the long dimension across the LCD, it's
    > harder to evaluate the shot. Mine is off, and it will stay off.


    For those who play their shots back on a television directly from the
    camera, this feature comes in very handy. Otherwise...it's a waste of
    screen space on the camera...
     
    Mark M, Oct 8, 2004
    #8
  9. Ken Tough

    SBC News Guest

    You can turn auto rotate off. Its stupid anyway. Just rotate it on your
    computer if you held the camera on its side.

    "Colin D" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ken Tough wrote:
    >>
    >> Mark M <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >"Ken Tough" <> wrote

    >>
    >> >> Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    >> >> display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    >> >> if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]

    >>
    >> >Then...heaven forbid...you might have to rotate the shot after the fact
    >> >like
    >> >we've been doing for years.

    >>
    >> Sorry, I neglected to put the smiley. I can just imagine that
    >> it would be annoying if it was random when shooting down from a
    >> tripod to flat material on a table. The other annoying thing is that
    >> when rotated, the image has to be reduced in size because of the
    >> aspect ratio of the display. Can it be switched off as an option?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ken Tough

    >
    > I watched a photog with a D70 on a tripod shooting a portrait shot of a
    > child recently. He had the auto-rotate turned on, and the camera LCD
    > dutifully showed the image rotated sideways, so he was screwing his head
    > sideways to look at the image. I asked him why he didn't turn
    > auto-rotate off, and he claimed that the camera couldn't do that. Not
    > knowing much about D70s I didn't argue, I just said that I could do that
    > with my 300D, and left it at that. Personally, I think it's a pretty
    > useless gimmick anyway, and it's only there to avoid rotating the camera
    > when playing back shots with the camera in hand. And since it reduces
    > the size of the image to fit the long dimension across the LCD, it's
    > harder to evaluate the shot. Mine is off, and it will stay off.
    >
    > Colin.
     
    SBC News, Oct 8, 2004
    #9
  10. "SBC News" <> writes:

    > You can turn auto rotate off. Its stupid anyway. Just rotate it on your
    > computer if you held the camera on its side.


    I find with my particular workflow, it is much faster if I have the pictures
    marked in the EXIF field for their rotation, so my download software can
    automatically rotate the pictures (and reset the EXIF field). One of my wished
    for features in my next camera is to have the camera do that automatically
    (right now, I do it as part of the review stage while the card is still in the
    camera).

    --
    Michael Meissner
    email:
    http://www.the-meissners.org
     
    Michael Meissner, Oct 8, 2004
    #10
  11. Ken Tough

    Skip M Guest

    "Michael Meissner" <> wrote in message
    news:-meissners.org...
    > "SBC News" <> writes:
    >
    >> You can turn auto rotate off. Its stupid anyway. Just rotate it on your
    >> computer if you held the camera on its side.

    >
    > I find with my particular workflow, it is much faster if I have the
    > pictures
    > marked in the EXIF field for their rotation, so my download software can
    > automatically rotate the pictures (and reset the EXIF field). One of my
    > wished
    > for features in my next camera is to have the camera do that automatically
    > (right now, I do it as part of the review stage while the card is still in
    > the
    > camera).
    >
    > --
    > Michael Meissner
    > email:
    > http://www.the-meissners.org


    Unlike the other guys in this subthread, I like the autorotate, just for
    that reason. It's on with my 20D, it was a small source of irritation with
    my D30 that I had to go through and rotate the images one by one. Since I
    shoot mostly portrait oriented images, that could be time consuming. When I
    shot film, the contact sheets were pretty uniform, all the verticals lined
    up neatly, with only the rare horizontal disturbing the sheet's wa...

    --
    Skip Middleton
    http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
     
    Skip M, Oct 8, 2004
    #11
  12. Ken Tough

    {STP} Guest

    In article <-meissners.org>,
    Michael Meissner <> wrote:

    > "SBC News" <> writes:
    >
    > > You can turn auto rotate off. Its stupid anyway. Just rotate it
    > > on your computer if you held the camera on its side.

    >
    > I find with my particular workflow, it is much faster if I have the
    > pictures marked in the EXIF field for their rotation, so my download
    > software can automatically rotate the pictures (and reset the EXIF
    > field).


    I agree with this 100%.

    {STP}
     
    {STP}, Oct 8, 2004
    #12
  13. Ken Tough

    Rudi Cheow Guest

    >
    > Personally, I think it's a pretty
    > useless gimmick anyway...
    >


    I think it's by no means "useless" - in fact for me and shooting I do,
    it's invaluable.

    I almost always shoot handheld, so the tripod-head-skewing-syndrome is
    not an issue for me, and a large proportion (about 40%-50%) of my
    shots are portrait orientated. This means that when I view the preview
    on screen (which I don't do much anyway - I carry an Archos AV400 with
    me as storage and for viewing pictures), it is orientated correctly.
    Yes, the actual preview size is smaller because it takes up less space
    on screen, but as I said, I don't use this much anyway (and where's
    the harm in zooming?).

    But the most useful thing about the feature for me is the fact that I
    don't have to rotate the vertical ones once they're on my PC - when
    you go away on a trip and take thousands of shots, the last thing you
    want to do is go through them and rotate the ones that you shot
    vertically, especially when there's loads of them.

    So I for one completely welcome this feature - and by no means would I
    say it's useless or is a gimmick.

    And heck, if folks don't like it, they can turn it off! :)

    Rudi
     
    Rudi Cheow, Oct 8, 2004
    #13
  14. Ken Tough

    Ken Tough Guest

    Peter Rongsted <> wrote:

    >Yes you can switch the rotation of the display off for playback. The
    >image will still be rotated when you transfer it to the pc (unless it
    >has been turned off on the pc). The detection can also be switch off.
    >But then of couse the picture cannot be rotated automatically.


    Now that sounds ideal. I hope the Nikon View software does that,
    rotating the image when downloaded even if the cam doesn't
    display it rotated.


    --
    Ken Tough
     
    Ken Tough, Oct 8, 2004
    #14
  15. Ken Tough

    Mark M Guest

    "Rudi Cheow" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >
    > > Personally, I think it's a pretty
    > > useless gimmick anyway...
    > >

    >
    > I think it's by no means "useless" - in fact for me and shooting I do,
    > it's invaluable.
    >
    > I almost always shoot handheld, so the tripod-head-skewing-syndrome is
    > not an issue for me, and a large proportion (about 40%-50%) of my
    > shots are portrait orientated. This means that when I view the preview
    > on screen (which I don't do much anyway - I carry an Archos AV400 with
    > me as storage and for viewing pictures), it is orientated correctly.
    > Yes, the actual preview size is smaller because it takes up less space
    > on screen, but as I said, I don't use this much anyway (and where's
    > the harm in zooming?).
    >
    > But the most useful thing about the feature for me is the fact that I
    > don't have to rotate the vertical ones once they're on my PC - when
    > you go away on a trip and take thousands of shots, the last thing you
    > want to do is go through them and rotate the ones that you shot
    > vertically, especially when there's loads of them.
    >
    > So I for one completely welcome this feature - and by no means would I
    > say it's useless or is a gimmick.
    >
    > And heck, if folks don't like it, they can turn it off! :)


    What I wish is that it would rotate automatically when transferred, but that
    it would NOT rotate on the camera screen. The rotation on the camera screen
    means that I end up reviewing a tiny version of the image instead of the
    full size review of the landscape shots...
     
    Mark M, Oct 8, 2004
    #15
  16. "Mark M" <> writes:

    > What I wish is that it would rotate automatically when transferred, but that
    > it would NOT rotate on the camera screen. The rotation on the camera screen
    > means that I end up reviewing a tiny version of the image instead of the
    > full size review of the landscape shots...


    Furthermore, if you're holding the camera in the position you took the
    photo in, and the image is rotated on the screen -- it's wrong for how
    you're viewing it!
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Oct 8, 2004
    #16
  17. Ken Tough

    sid derra Guest

    "{STP}" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <-meissners.org>,
    > Michael Meissner <> wrote:
    >
    > > "SBC News" <> writes:
    > >
    > > > You can turn auto rotate off. Its stupid anyway. Just rotate it
    > > > on your computer if you held the camera on its side.

    > >
    > > I find with my particular workflow, it is much faster if I have the
    > > pictures marked in the EXIF field for their rotation, so my download
    > > software can automatically rotate the pictures (and reset the EXIF
    > > field).

    >
    > I agree with this 100%.


    same here...
     
    sid derra, Oct 8, 2004
    #17
  18. David Dyer-Bennet <> writes:

    > "Mark M" <> writes:
    >
    > > What I wish is that it would rotate automatically when transferred, but
    > > that it would NOT rotate on the camera screen. The rotation on the camera
    > > screen means that I end up reviewing a tiny version of the image instead of
    > > the full size review of the landscape shots...

    >
    > Furthermore, if you're holding the camera in the position you took the photo
    > in, and the image is rotated on the screen -- it's wrong for how you're
    > viewing it!


    One of the features that Minolta quotes for the new D7D is that their rotation
    sensor will sense this and rotate the image so if you are holding the camera
    side ways it will still have the picture oriented correctly. Hopefully it also
    means that the rotation sensor will set the EXIF field.

    --
    Michael Meissner
    email:
    http://www.the-meissners.org
     
    Michael Meissner, Oct 9, 2004
    #18
  19. Colin D <> wrote:

    >Ken Tough wrote:
    >>
    >> Mark M <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >"Ken Tough" <> wrote

    >>
    >> >> Stupid question, but how does it know when to rotate the shot for
    >> >> display on the back LCD? Gravity? Clever image processing? What
    >> >> if you shoot straight down? [or skydiving?]

    >>
    >> >Then...heaven forbid...you might have to rotate the shot after the fact like
    >> >we've been doing for years.

    >>
    >> Sorry, I neglected to put the smiley. I can just imagine that
    >> it would be annoying if it was random when shooting down from a
    >> tripod to flat material on a table. The other annoying thing is that
    >> when rotated, the image has to be reduced in size because of the
    >> aspect ratio of the display. Can it be switched off as an option?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ken Tough

    >
    >I watched a photog with a D70 on a tripod shooting a portrait shot of a
    >child recently. He had the auto-rotate turned on, and the camera LCD
    >dutifully showed the image rotated sideways, so he was screwing his head
    >sideways to look at the image. I asked him why he didn't turn
    >auto-rotate off, and he claimed that the camera couldn't do that. Not
    >knowing much about D70s I didn't argue, I just said that I could do that
    >with my 300D, and left it at that. Personally, I think it's a pretty
    >useless gimmick anyway, and it's only there to avoid rotating the camera
    >when playing back shots with the camera in hand. And since it reduces
    >the size of the image to fit the long dimension across the LCD, it's
    >harder to evaluate the shot. Mine is off, and it will stay off.


    He is just an idiot. On the D70 go into the playback menu and set
    'Rotate Tall' to OFF. You can also go down to the setup menu and set
    'Image rotation' to OFF, but then the camera will not record the format
    of the shot.

    Peter

    Peter
     
    Peter Rongsted, Oct 9, 2004
    #19
  20. (Rudi Cheow) wrote:

    >>
    >> Personally, I think it's a pretty
    >> useless gimmick anyway...
    >>

    >
    >I think it's by no means "useless" - in fact for me and shooting I do,
    >it's invaluable.
    >
    >I almost always shoot handheld, so the tripod-head-skewing-syndrome is
    >not an issue for me, and a large proportion (about 40%-50%) of my
    >shots are portrait orientated. This means that when I view the preview
    >on screen (which I don't do much anyway - I carry an Archos AV400 with
    >me as storage and for viewing pictures), it is orientated correctly.
    >Yes, the actual preview size is smaller because it takes up less space
    >on screen, but as I said, I don't use this much anyway (and where's
    >the harm in zooming?).
    >
    >But the most useful thing about the feature for me is the fact that I
    >don't have to rotate the vertical ones once they're on my PC - when
    >you go away on a trip and take thousands of shots, the last thing you
    >want to do is go through them and rotate the ones that you shot
    >vertically, especially when there's loads of them.


    Or you could just read the manuall. And set the camera up to record the
    format and have i rotated when transfered to the pc, but turn the
    'Rotate tall' off in the play menu. Then you would get the best of both
    worlds.

    Peter
     
    Peter Rongsted, Oct 9, 2004
    #20
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