Cyan skies. The absolute, simple, unvarnished TRUTH!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Rich, Mar 14, 2011.

  1. Rich

    Rich Guest

    It is due to overexposure. The sensors shift their output. You can
    f--- up ANY blue sky shot by doing that. The trick is to control the
    exposure of the sky while avoiding darkening down the landscape too
    much. In some instances (close proximity to the sun in the sky) it is
    impossible. Before, a Cokin graduated filter was a good way of doing
    this, but even specialized filters have fallen out of favour since
    software took their places. Looks like the only way this will be
    fixed is when HDR becomes a normal, in-camera process and looks
    realistic, which will be a long time coming.
     
    Rich, Mar 14, 2011
    #1
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  2. Rich

    Peter N Guest

    On Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:17:55 -0700 (PDT), Rich <>
    wrote:
    > It is due to overexposure. The sensors shift their output. You can
    > f--- up ANY blue sky shot by doing that. The trick is to control

    the
    > exposure of the sky while avoiding darkening down the landscape too
    > much. In some instances (close proximity to the sun in the sky) it

    is
    > impossible. Before, a Cokin graduated filter was a good way of

    doing
    > this, but even specialized filters have fallen out of favour since
    > software took their places. Looks like the only way this will be
    > fixed is when HDR becomes a normal, in-camera process and looks
    > realistic, which will be a long time coming.


    And exactly what is preventing you from using a Cokin filter, or HDR?
    Not that anybody expects a rational answer.

    --
    from my Droid
     
    Peter N, Mar 16, 2011
    #2
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  3. Rich

    Rich Guest

    Re: Cyan skies. The absolute, simple, unvarnished TRUTH!

    On Mar 15, 8:34 pm, Peter N <> wrote:
    > On Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:17:55 -0700 (PDT), Rich <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > It is due to overexposure.  The sensors shift their output.  You can
    > > f--- up ANY blue sky shot by doing that.   The trick is to control

    > the
    > > exposure of the sky while avoiding darkening down the landscape too
    > > much.  In some instances (close proximity to the sun in the sky) it

    > is
    > > impossible.  Before, a Cokin graduated filter was a good way of

    > doing
    > > this, but even specialized filters have fallen out of favour since
    > > software took their places.  Looks like the only way this will be
    > > fixed is when HDR becomes a normal, in-camera process and looks
    > > realistic, which will be a long time coming.

    >
    > And exactly what is preventing you from using a Cokin filter, or HDR?
    > Not that anybody expects a rational answer.


    Nothing, but I still have to LOOK at images posted by others with the
    cyan sky disease.
     
    Rich, Mar 16, 2011
    #3
  4. Rich

    Rich Guest

    Re: Cyan skies. The absolute, simple, unvarnished TRUTH!

    On Mar 15, 10:30 pm, Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com>
    wrote:
    > On 2011-03-15 17:34:58 -0700, Peter N <> said:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:17:55 -0700 (PDT), Rich <> wrote:
    > >> It is due to overexposure.  The sensors shift their output.  You can
    > >> f--- up ANY blue sky shot by doing that.   The trick is to control

    > > the
    > >> exposure of the sky while avoiding darkening down the landscape too
    > >> much.  In some instances (close proximity to the sun in the sky) it

    > > is
    > >> impossible.  Before, a Cokin graduated filter was a good way of

    > > doing
    > >> this, but even specialized filters have fallen out of favour since
    > >> software took their places.  Looks like the only way this will be
    > >> fixed is when HDR becomes a normal, in-camera process and looks
    > >> realistic, which will be a long time coming.

    >
    > > And exactly what is preventing you from using a Cokin filter, or HDR?
    > > Not that anybody expects a rational answer.

    >
    > OK! Let's try these, ND Grad, CP, or HDR?
    > <http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/DNC_7858E1w2.jpg>
    > <http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/DNC_7868E1w2.jpg>
    >
    > BTW; this was this morning down on the coast, off Hwy 1, near Cambria.
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    >
    > Savageduck


    They look fine, no cyan issues at all.
     
    Rich, Mar 16, 2011
    #4
  5. On 3/16/2011 3:12 AM, Eric Stevens wrote:

    >> OK! Let's try these, ND Grad, CP, or HDR?
    >> < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/DNC_7858E1w2.jpg>
    >> < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/DNC_7868E1w2.jpg>
    >>
    >> BTW; this was this morning down on the coast, off Hwy 1, near Cambria.

    >
    > The second one is oversaturated according to my screen.
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Eric Stevens


    Not oversaturated ... just the level adjusted to keep the white foam
    well in range, with "highlight/shadow" not applied in Photoshop.

    Doug McDonald
     
    Doug McDonald, Mar 16, 2011
    #5
  6. Rich

    Peter N Guest

    On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 21:12:42 +1300, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 19:30:11 -0700, Savageduck
    > <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:



    > >On 2011-03-15 17:34:58 -0700, Peter N <> said:
    > >
    > >> On Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:17:55 -0700 (PDT), Rich

    <> wrote:
    > >>> It is due to overexposure. The sensors shift their output.

    You can
    > >>> f--- up ANY blue sky shot by doing that. The trick is to

    control
    > >> the
    > >>> exposure of the sky while avoiding darkening down the landscape

    too
    > >>> much. In some instances (close proximity to the sun in the

    sky) it
    > >> is
    > >>> impossible. Before, a Cokin graduated filter was a good way of
    > >> doing
    > >>> this, but even specialized filters have fallen out of favour

    since
    > >>> software took their places. Looks like the only way this will

    be
    > >>> fixed is when HDR becomes a normal, in-camera process and looks
    > >>> realistic, which will be a long time coming.
    > >>
    > >> And exactly what is preventing you from using a Cokin filter, or

    HDR?
    > >> Not that anybody expects a rational answer.

    > >
    > >OK! Let's try these, ND Grad, CP, or HDR?
    > >< http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/DNC_7858E1w2.jpg >
    > >< http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/DNC_7868E1w2.jpg >
    > >
    > >BTW; this was this morning down on the coast, off Hwy 1, near

    Cambria.


    > The second one is oversaturated according to my screen.



    > Regards,



    > Eric Stevens


    Only a matter of taste. The image only needs to satisfy the maker.

    --
    from my Droid
     
    Peter N, Mar 16, 2011
    #6
  7. Rich

    Peter N Guest

    Re: Cyan skies. The absolute, simple, unvarnished TRUTH!

    On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 05:27:32 -0700 (PDT), Rich <>
    wrote:
    > On Mar 15, 8:34pm, Peter N <> wrote:
    > > On Mon, 14 Mar 2011 14:17:55 -0700 (PDT), Rich

    <>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > > It is due to overexposure. The sensors shift their output.

    You ca=
    > n
    > > > f--- up ANY blue sky shot by doing that.  The trick is to

    control
    > > the
    > > > exposure of the sky while avoiding darkening down the landscape

    too
    > > > much. In some instances (close proximity to the sun in the

    sky) it
    > > is
    > > > impossible. Before, a Cokin graduated filter was a good way of

    > > doing
    > > > this, but even specialized filters have fallen out of favour

    since
    > > > software took their places. Looks like the only way this will

    be
    > > > fixed is when HDR becomes a normal, in-camera process and looks
    > > > realistic, which will be a long time coming.

    > >
    > > And exactly what is preventing you from using a Cokin filter, or

    HDR?
    > > Not that anybody expects a rational answer.



    > Nothing, but I still have to LOOK at images posted by others with

    the
    > cyan sky disease.


    Is anyone forcing you

    --
    from my Droid
     
    Peter N, Mar 16, 2011
    #7
  8. Rich

    John Turco Guest

    Rich wrote:
    >
    > It is due to overexposure. The sensors shift their output. You can
    > f--- up ANY blue sky shot by doing that. The trick is to control the
    > exposure of the sky while avoiding darkening down the landscape too
    > much. In some instances (close proximity to the sun in the sky) it is
    > impossible. Before, a Cokin graduated filter was a good way of doing
    > this, but even specialized filters have fallen out of favour since
    > software took their places. Looks like the only way this will be
    > fixed is when HDR becomes a normal, in-camera process and looks
    > realistic, which will be a long time coming.



    Kodak's upcoming "EasyShare Max Z990" (12 megapixels, 30x optical
    zoom) will have a built-in HDR mode.

    --
    Cordially,
    John Turco <>

    Marie's Musings <http://fairiesandtails.blogspot.com>
     
    John Turco, Mar 31, 2011
    #8
  9. John Turco <> wrote:
    > Rich wrote:


    >> It is due to overexposure. The sensors shift their output. You can
    >> f--- up ANY blue sky shot by doing that. The trick is to control the
    >> exposure of the sky while avoiding darkening down the landscape too
    >> much. In some instances (close proximity to the sun in the sky) it is
    >> impossible. Before, a Cokin graduated filter was a good way of doing
    >> this, but even specialized filters have fallen out of favour since
    >> software took their places. Looks like the only way this will be
    >> fixed is when HDR becomes a normal, in-camera process and looks
    >> realistic, which will be a long time coming.


    > Kodak's upcoming "EasyShare Max Z990" (12 megapixels, 30x optical
    > zoom) will have a built-in HDR mode.


    Some Sony DSLRs have had HDR for at least a year.

    --
    Chris Malcolm
     
    Chris Malcolm, Apr 1, 2011
    #9
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