CSI system: Monochrome printing. Info requested. TIA

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by John, Sep 17, 2010.

  1. John

    John Guest

    I do nearly all of my work in monochrome with very little in colour.
    However, I would like to use a printer devoted to B&W. Using a
    CSI system seems to be the most economical and a printer using only
    monochrome inks seems to be about the only way of avoiding colour
    casts.

    Advice from those who have used such a system would be
    much appreciated.

    I have specified neither printer make nor model because I am still
    undecided on those matters. A great deal depends on the characteristics
    of the CSI system I intend to use.

    Thanks in advance.

    John
     
    John, Sep 17, 2010
    #1
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  2. John

    Bruce Guest

    John <> wrote:

    >I do nearly all of my work in monochrome with very little in colour.
    >However, I would like to use a printer devoted to B&W. Using a
    >CSI system seems to be the most economical and a printer using only
    >monochrome inks seems to be about the only way of avoiding colour
    >casts.
    >
    >Advice from those who have used such a system would be
    >much appreciated.
    >
    >I have specified neither printer make nor model because I am still
    >undecided on those matters. A great deal depends on the characteristics
    >of the CSI system I intend to use.



    You will get a wide range of views depending where you post your
    question. Alas, the time when you could expect a good selection of
    worthwhile answers from Usenet photo newsgroups passed several years
    back. To get a comprehensive range of views, you will need to find
    other online (but non-Usenet) forums with a higher proportion of
    serious photographers than here. However, here is my view:

    Lyson have a good name and their systems for producing B&W prints
    using Epson colour printers are very good indeed.

    When I upgraded from an Epson 2400 to an Epson 2880 I intended to
    convert the 2400 to B&W with a Lyson system. However, my experience
    with the Epson 2880 using Epson inks has shown that I have absolutely
    no need of a dedicated B&W printer. The 2880 does it all.

    Others will have differing opinions. ;-)
     
    Bruce, Sep 17, 2010
    #2
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  3. John

    eatmorepies Guest

    "John" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I do nearly all of my work in monochrome with very little in colour.
    > However, I would like to use a printer devoted to B&W. Using a
    > CSI system seems to be the most economical and a printer using only
    > monochrome inks seems to be about the only way of avoiding colour
    > casts.
    >


    I use two printers for monochrome.

    A 1290s set to black ink only and print at 2880 dpi with paper setting on
    Epson premium glossy.

    For more subtle greys I use a 3880 with Epson ink. It cost a lot to start
    with but you get a great deal of ink when you buy the printer and both mono
    and colour prints are very very good.

    Two friends of mine have CIS systems - both have had problems with
    banding - possibly leakage into the system. The bottom line is that the two
    CIS systems I have experience of have poor reliablilty.

    If you've spent a lot of money on bodies/lenses then don't spoil the ship by
    using poor printing methods.

    John
     
    eatmorepies, Sep 17, 2010
    #3
  4. John

    MC Guest

    John wrote:

    > I do nearly all of my work in monochrome with very little in colour.
    > However, I would like to use a printer devoted to B&W. Using a
    > CSI system seems to be the most economical and a printer using only
    > monochrome inks seems to be about the only way of avoiding colour
    > casts.
    >
    > Advice from those who have used such a system would be
    > much appreciated.
    >
    > I have specified neither printer make nor model because I am still
    > undecided on those matters. A great deal depends on the
    > characteristics of the CSI system I intend to use.
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    > John


    As other replies have suggested, Epson seems to be the way to go. The
    Epson printers mentioned by the other posters (R2400, R2880 etc...) use
    three blacks, Black, Light Black and Light Light Black, on top of C, M,
    Y, LM, LC. These three inks are more than ample for getting cast free
    B&W prints. Of all the printers I have used, I find the Epsons are far
    superior in the B&W printing stakes.

    MC
     
    MC, Sep 18, 2010
    #4
  5. John

    Me Guest

    On 18/09/2010 9:00 p.m., Andrew Haley wrote:
    > John<> wrote:
    >> I do nearly all of my work in monochrome with very little in colour.
    >> However, I would like to use a printer devoted to B&W. Using a
    >> CSI system seems to be the most economical and a printer using only
    >> monochrome inks seems to be about the only way of avoiding colour
    >> casts.

    >
    > That's not quite true. Quad Tone RIP does it by adding tiny amounts
    > of light cyan and light magenta to the black and light black inks.
    > This doesn't require any ink changes, and produces perfectly neutral
    > and toneable monochrome prints. It also achieves tremendous density
    > and shadow detail.
    >
    > http://www.quadtonerip.com/html/QTRoverview.html
    >

    Even the Canon/HP/Epson pigment ink printers using 3 or more shades of
    "neutral" black also use some colour ink for monochrome printing.
    AFAIK (I used to be an ink chemist) there were some problems getting
    neutral black water-based ink stable, as the carbon black pigment has
    brown under-tones, and the blue/violet pigments used to offset this
    cause instability of the pigment suspension. Earlier (Epson 2200
    vintage) inksets use only carbon black, but later models have more
    neutral black, as ways were found to stabilise the ink with two pigments.
    But while nearly neutral, there's going to be a difference between mass
    tone and under-tone of the two pigments, so probably not perfectly
    neutral at all densities, hence the use of some cyan/magenta.
    The monochrome output of Epson 2400 (and later/larger) printers for
    monochrome can be stunning. Good ICC profiles seem to be essential -
    the Epson profiles used with Epson paper are good, as are Ilford, and
    probably others, but unless able to make your own custom profiles, using
    off-brand papers might cause some problems.
     
    Me, Sep 19, 2010
    #5
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